My Nursing License Is At Risk - Or Is It? - page 6

by TheCommuter 38,383 Views | 68 Comments Senior Moderator

I often listen as certain coworkers, usually the nurses with zero to two years of experience, chime about the dangers to their hard-earned nursing licenses. 的知 putting my license on the line by dealing with that difficult... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    Only 158 dollars per year?

    You'd have to be a foolish or in a terrible financial constraints to NOT have malpractice insurance at that rate!
    I've always been against it as a waste of money...until I switched jobs. Mine cost something like $120 a year. It also covers bills if I am assaulted at work or while commuting to or from work, it covers up to 25K in HIPAA fines, legal defense against disciplinary actions, and some other things you wouldn't think a malpractice policy would cover.
  2. 0
    Quote from merlee
    ...
    What I really resent is when a management type threatens a nurse by saying they will report her to the BON for some minor screw-up on the floor.
    Question: Can one report management for unsafe patient ratios, the stress that brings on the nurses that they cannot take a break, and still get docked for it?
  3. 0
    Quote from Mulan
    10 Ways to Lose Your Nursing License - Nursing Link

    "9. Patient Abuse and Neglect

    Sadly, this is quite obvious and, even worse, happens more often than we壇 like to admit. Patient neglect and abuse can happen because a nurse is intentionally causing pain and/or suffering, or because of a simple mistake because a nurse is over-worked or has too many patients. One of the most serious offenses, patient neglect and abuses affects more than just the nurse, and even more than just the patient. The patient痴 friends and family must also suffer alongside him/her, making this grave offense even worse.
    Unfortunately, this happens all too often. Many times, a nurse doesn稚 neglect a patient on purpose, but her forgetfulness can cause more damage than imagined and result in the loss of her license."

    This reminds me of a very importan email I got from ANA...I am pasting it along here, because we all need to get involved to make our conditions better. Granted, I am a new graduate with not job, but this change is imperative for us...It is easy, just fill your name and it automatically goes to your senator and representative. This bill will help us with patient ratios....something baddly needed to lessen these errors.

    https://secure3.convio.net/ana/site/...rAction&id=403
  4. 0
    Quote from FLmed
    Thank you for sharing this. :-)
    Wow, I clicked on the very first one and there were 7 charges against this person....WOW.
  5. 0
    If one has obtained their lvn or rn why would they choose to work at a nursing home. Seems so depressing. Just askin'
    '
  6. 1
    Quote from suzimarie
    If one has obtained their lvn or rn why would they choose to work at a nursing home. Seems so depressing. Just askin'
    '
    Some of us do not enjoy the fast pace or the high-pressure environment of the acute care hospital setting; therefore, we purposely choose to work in nursing homes.
    annlewis likes this.
  7. 2
    Quote from suzimarie
    If one has obtained their lvn or rn why would they choose to work at a nursing home. Seems so depressing. Just askin''
    I love the nursing home and hated the hospital. Yesterday, to honor the veterans they had someone come sing old timer songs. I watched patients that never engage with the staff dance, and thought that was awesome ( dementia patients). It may be sad sometimes, but for some of them we are all they have.
    annlewis and tryingtohaveitall like this.
  8. 0
    I think these nurse's that are worried about losing their licenses are just misguided. They are probably taught in school that they may be in danger of losing their license for these trivial things. They should be taught to cover their backsides and document well because unfortunately there are so many people out their ready to sue the first person they can find and make an easy buck.
  9. 1
    Here is my 2 year old nursing take on all of this.
    1) read the BON reports on disciplinary action, very educational
    2) don't do what these nurses did
    3) be honest with your self, stay within your scope of practice
    4) document all and any patient interactions, interventions, outcomes
    5) The most important one (to me) do the best you can, if you do this the odds are you will not lose your liscense. Don't take shortcuts, give it your best, we're only human, not perfect, but if you strive to be you will do the best you can


    Quote from TheCommuter
    I often listen as certain coworkers, usually the nurses with zero to two years of experience, chime about the dangers to their hard-earned nursing licenses. “I’m putting my license on the line by dealing with that difficult patient!” “I forgot to give a vitamin B12 shot yesterday, so is my license at risk?” “The staffing at this facility is so bad that I think I’m going to lose my license if I continue working here!”

    Personally, four of my former coworkers have had their nursing licensure revoked in recent years. To give newer nurses an idea of the various offenses that frequently lead to revocation of one’s nursing license, I will share the stories of these four nurses.

    NOTE: Some readers might be concerned about privacy issues. To respect the privacy of these four individuals, I used pseudonyms to obscure their real names and will be purposely vague about the details that lead to action being taken against their licenses.

    However, keep in mind that their real names, license numbers, last known addresses, last known workplaces, educational backgrounds, and exact circumstances that lead to loss of licensure all appear on the board of nursing’s (BON) website of the state where I reside since all of this is public information.

    Story Number One – Samantha

    Samantha, a registered nurse in her mid-thirties, had approximately three years of experience as an ER nurse at a popular acute care hospital when she accepted a job at the local nursing home where I was working at the time. Her employment with the hospital had been terminated because she had been caught stealing hydrocodone, tramadol, and other medications from the Pyxis. In addition, her urine tested positive for these drugs.

    The unit manager at the hospital referred her license number to the state BON, and after an investigation was completed, Samantha was placed on a peer assistance program for impaired nurses. Other local hospitals did not want to deal with the restrictions surrounding her peer assistance order, so she took a job at the nursing home where she was not allowed to handle controlled substances or hold the key to the narcotic box. Her license was revoked one year later after she repeatedly tested positive for hydrocodone and failed to satisfactorily complete the peer assistance program.

    Story Number Two – Leanne

    Leanne, a registered nurse, was the director of nursing (DON) at a nursing home where I once worked. After an extremely dismal state survey that resulted in multiple immediate jeopardy citations, she was escorted out of the facility by federal surveyors. Her license number was referred to the state board of nursing for falsifying documents, fabricating information, and failing to care plan serious issues. Her license was revoked by default because she failed to appear to the BON hearing where the formal charges filed against her would have been discussed if she had been present.

    Story Number Three – Melissa

    Melissa, a licensed vocational nurse in her late twenties, tested positive for prescription narcotics. She was employed on the busy rehab unit of a local nursing home, and management noticed that her behavior became increasingly bizarre over her three years of working there. Soon after the assistant director of nursing referred Melissa’s license number to the BON, she ended up at a local psychiatric hospital after having attempted suicide. Her license was revoked by default because she failed to appear to the BON hearing where her case would have been discussed if she had been present.

    Story Number Four – Betsy

    Betsy, a licensed vocational nurse in her late twenties, was caught diverting massive amounts of hydrocodone and alprazolam (Xanax) from the nursing home where she worked. The pharmacy calculated that she diverted almost $10,000 worth of prescription drugs over a 12-month period. Her license number was referred to the state BON for diversion and defrauding the facility and patients of the cost of the medications. Her license was revoked by default because she failed to appear to the BON hearing where her case was to be discussed if she had shown up.
    Last edit by TheCommuter on Nov 15, '12 : Reason: [/QUOTE] tags
    annlewis likes this.
  10. 0
    A friend of mine says the ANA does not really follow thru on helping nurses, she says the organization not focused on nurse issues, regardless of the petition


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