Medical Marijuana for RN's - page 3

Is it ok for a registered nurse to use medical marijuana (with a prescription) outside of work of course?... Read More

  1. 8
    A dear friend of mine who died from AIDS swore up one side and down the other that his Marinol did not come anywhere close a joint for him in terms of appetite, pain relief, nor nausea. Far be it for me to tell a terminally ill man he can't smoke his weed.

    As long as it remains illegal, it has no draw for me as a nurse.

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  2. 7
    Quote from Elvish
    A dear friend of mine who died from AIDS swore up one side and down the other that his Marinol did not come anywhere close a joint for him in terms of appetite, pain relief, nor nausea. Far be it for me to tell a terminally ill man he can't smoke his weed.

    As long as it remains illegal, it has no draw for me as a nurse.
    oh my gosh, this is so true, elvish.
    i have had many, MANY hospice pts who complain that marinol did nothing to relieve their symptoms.
    and smoking a bone certainly wasn't for the high, since they were all heavily dosed on narcs.
    sometimes you just gotta do what you gotta do.
    certainly not for me to judge.
    and more important, their comfort (esp at eol) is paramount to attaining peace.

    leslie
    FMF Corpsman, oklahomagal, Jessy_RN, and 4 others like this.
  3. 0
    Marijuana has negative effects on memory, so I think it can endanger patients because people who smoke pot are forgetful. I mean, if a nurse partakes, she will become more spaced out generally, which will impact her ability to give safe care.
  4. 4
    Quote from earle58
    oh my gosh, this is so true, elvish.
    i have had many, MANY hospice pts who complain that marinol did nothing to relieve their symptoms.
    and smoking a bone certainly wasn't for the high, since they were all heavily dosed on narcs.
    sometimes you just gotta do what you gotta do.
    certainly not for me to judge.
    and more important, their comfort (esp at eol) is paramount to attaining peace.

    leslie
    Word, leslie. My dad works in an inpt hospice in CA that allows residents to smoke marijuana. He finds it hilarious that part of his job is occasionally rolling and lighting joints for people.

    In terms of using it as an RN, I wouldn't. As has been said, I worked too damn hard for this. I'll even leave parties where it's being smoked, even though everyone says secondhand smoke isn't enough to make you throw a positive test. It's not worth it to me. And I really, really don't think the CA BON would give a fig if you had a prescription. Whether that's right or not is a separate issue.
    VivaLasViejas, Spidey's mom, Elvish, and 1 other like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from elizabells
    Word, leslie. My dad works in an inpt hospice in CA that allows residents to smoke marijuana. He finds it hilarious that part of his job is occasionally rolling and lighting joints for people.
    honest, it has worked magically for many of my pts.
    thank God, i work with an unconventional and compassionate group of people.

    leslie
  6. 10
    Quote from jlsRN
    Marijuana has negative effects on memory, so I think it can endanger patients because people who smoke pot are forgetful. I mean, if a nurse partakes, she will become more spaced out generally, which will impact her ability to give safe care.
    Nurses who use marijuana are not going to partake then come to work no more than a nurse would drink alcohol and come to work. What a nurse does in her off time, whether she drinks a glass of wine or smokes a joint. is not the hospitals business. Smoking pot on Sunday will not affect her job on Monday.
  7. 0
    Quote from awsmom8
    Nurses who use marijuana are not going to partake then come to work no more than a nurse would drink alcohol and come to work. What a nurse does in her off time, whether she drinks a glass of wine or smokes a joint. is not the hospitals business. Smoking pot on Sunday will not affect her job on Monday.
    From my personal experience smoking marijuana during my teenage years, it definately stays in you system. I was a space cadet when I wasn't 'high'. I really think marijuana affects short term memory.
  8. 0
    here are some links that provide the scientific research on marijuana and memory...

    [color=#ff4400]http://www.livescience.com/health/060313_pot_brain.html

    http://www.livescience.com/health/06...ot_memory.html

    "we found that the longer people used marijuana, the more deterioration they had in these cognitive abilities, especially in the ability to learn and remember new information," said study author lambros messinis, phd, of the department of neurology of the university hospital of patras in patras, greece. "in several areas, their abilities were significant enough to be considered impaired, with more impairment in the longer-term users than the shorter-term users."
  9. 0
    I personally think it should be legalized as well, even if only for medical purposes. I haven't smoked since I was a kid (and have no plans on it, unless it is legal, then maybe), but I don't think it is very dangerous. If legalized, the government could regulate it, make sure it is pure (too many dealers will toss something else in there). I have seen more problems from people drinking to excess. And cigarettes harm the body more than a joint would. Never heard of someone getting lung cancer or COPD, like my mother, from smoking marijuana.
  10. 0
    http://alcoholism.about.com/od/pot/a/blaan060315.htm

    Cognitive Abilities Slowed

    The researchers made the following observations:
    • Compared to non-smokers, marijuana users performed worse in recall, recognition and executive functions of the brain.
    • In make decisions, long-term users showed a 70 percent impaired performance, compared to 55 percent for short-term users and eight percent for non-users.
    • In a test to remember a list of words that was read to them earlier, non-users remembered 12 of the 15 words, short-term users remember and average of nine words, and long-term users remembered an average of seven.
    • Frequent smokers performed worse on tests of cognitive abilities, including divided attention (ability to pay attention to more than one stimulus at a time) and verbal fluency (number of words generated within a time limit).


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