Facebook while on the clock? - page 6

by maureen924 11,199 Views | 65 Comments

I am in my last semster and will graduate in December. During my clinical rotations, I have noticed many of the nurses, while on the clock, playing on the computer, checking their email and Facebook, booking vacations and such. I... Read More


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    Social networking sites are blocked at work, but I just use my phone. I check e-mails, use social media, text, etc from time to time at work, but it doesn't impede the care I give to my patients.
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    I think it is unprofessional to be on facebook, checking emails, or playing computer games while at work. If you want to check or do those things when your are your break/lunch more power to you. But you should never use the companies computer for your personal use. When at work you should be more worried about your patients than your personal affairs/interests.
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.
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    I'd like to know where, so I can apply there, since they have enough free time to do this!
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    what do you around 3 am when there is nothing left to do, those rare , very very rare night shifts, no one to change , no issues , no completely disoriented pts to wake up ( questionable ethics?) for a bed bath, etc. i read all the pts i have charts from the beginning . if a coworker starts texting instead i do not care. if a visitor walks by and sees i do not care. we are all sitting there doing "nothing" anyway. this is a once in 7 months event where i work , some nights we are so busy that a visitor can stand at the desk for ten minutes and not see anyone.
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    Quote from Esme12
    That is an acceptable use of technology...however....it's the abuse of this technology that is offensive. As a manager.....I have no problem with technology but the texting/Facebooking/Twittering is against policy and grounds for disciplinary action if/when you get caught.
    So you mean to tell me that if you catch someone tweeting or texting on THEIR cell phone you will discipline them??? Ouch... That's harsh... I'm a gadget junky, I couldn't imagine not being able to send out a text when I'm doing absolutely nothing... Now doing that on company equipment yea... I see the problem there... But my own stuff??? Nah... Pushing the evelope...
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    Quote from MatteyIce
    So you mean to tell me that if you catch someone tweeting or texting on THEIR cell phone you will discipline them??? Ouch... That's harsh... I'm a gadget junky, I couldn't imagine not being able to send out a text when I'm doing absolutely nothing... Now doing that on company equipment yea... I see the problem there... But my own stuff??? Nah... Pushing the evelope...
    If the hospital's policy expressly forbids the use of these things during the time they are paying you to work, then that is their right. If you don't like it, you can find a job where their policies match your expectations. I don't think expecting people to follow policy is harsh, and they were informed of policies and agreed to them in order to become an employee.
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.
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    Quote from MatteyIce
    So you mean to tell me that if you catch someone tweeting or texting on THEIR cell phone you will discipline them??? Ouch... That's harsh... I'm a gadget junky, I couldn't imagine not being able to send out a text when I'm doing absolutely nothing... Now doing that on company equipment yea... I see the problem there... But my own stuff??? Nah... Pushing the envelope...
    I couldn't imagine not being able to send out a text when I'm doing absolutely nothing.
    Why.....I started this debate, I am curious as to why? Why can't you wait for your break? What is sooo important that it can't wait til lunch time? What is the urgency? What is this NEED....this addiction to be constantly in touch? I find it exhausting.

    If the policy states no........ then the answer is no. Just like in the "old days" we were not allowed "personal phone calls at work" did we make them....yes, on our breaks.

    I won't slam you the moment I see you, but if you make a habit....and yoiu have been informed, formally and informally, that the behavior needs to be limited/stopped.........then, I have no issue with progressive discipline plans for those who refuse to follow policy.....or.....after numerous warnings if "you" really can't be professional enough to be respectful of me and the policies of the facility "you" (not you but the collective you) can seek a better fit elsewhere.

    It is that simple.
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.
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    That was my point, the computers screens were facing the pt area in an Pediatric Cardiac ICU. The families could see what was going on. I understand everyone needs downtime, don't forget I am a nurse too, however I was giving my family perspective. If the screens were facing the other direction, I would have assumed that the staff was working. It was a difficult intense time in our family to see our baby laying there in bed with tubes. Family perception weighs a lot in their opinion of a family members care. If I sound defensive I don't mean to, I was just trying to give the view from the other side.
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    I've got micromedex and epocrates on my phone, so I could be looking up a drug before giving it and you assume I'm texting of on fb? Not cool. If you have so much free time that you can monitor everyone's internet use, you may want to look at your actions first.
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    Quote from SionainnRN
    I've got micromedex and epocrates on my phone, so I could be looking up a drug before giving it and you assume I'm texting of on fb? Not cool. If you have so much free time that you can monitor everyone's internet use, you may want to look at your actions first.
    When I worked as an extern someone else apparently had the time to monitor me, because I received a report at review time that I was texting at work, when all I used that thing for was med and lab lookups. So yes, they do assume you are texting. And the report remained anonymous to me so that I could not confront the person who reported me or discuss with anyone. For all I know it kept me from being employed on that unit as a nurse come graduation time, since I don't know which unit it was. And the hospital didn't even have a "phone use" policy at that time, so whatever I was doing, I wasn't violating a policy, but got reported anyway. If there's a policy against using a phone, then you need to decide whether your apps are worth it to you. If there's no policy, carry on and people can make their assumptions about the care you give. I'm sure some idiot thinks my Nortel phone that's the size of a modern cordless is my personal cell that I'm answering calls on while I'm in their room, when in reality other staff and patients are calling me.


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