Do potential employers owe you an explaination? - page 3

by Marshall1

6,518 Views | 52 Comments

Often times on here I've posts on here where a an interview has taken place, maybe even a second one, the person is told "you will hear something soon" but "soon" turns into a week, two weeks..no response. The interviewee may... Read More


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    A local hospital system I have been applying to sends out an email, basically saying, thanks for applying, but you're not being considered for that particular position. This is before an interview has even occurred. Gives me hope for all of the other positions I have applied to and haven't heard back from them yet.

    I think if you go on an interview and they state you will hear back in a few days, they should contact you either way to say you did or didn't get the job. Takes 5 mins, tops, to send out a generic form email, but gives a person weeks to months piece of mind and ability to move on.
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    Nothing is OWED, but common courtesy and professionalism should trigger some type of notification that you did not make the cut.
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    The potential employers that I apply to send out a detailed automated response confirming that they relieve my application, and If I don't get notified, my information is kept on file for future opportunities. If they don't contact me, obviously they went on to someone else. I move on until the next position comes along. If I get a call back after an interview, usually is to say when do I want to start. Most employers do not have the time to contact everyone, and I understand that. On to the next one...
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    Nobody owes you an explanation for why you did not get hired, and it opens them up to potential liability. But they absolutely should send out a generic form letter to unsuccessful candidates to let them know the position has been filled. How much time does it take already? After we've spent time, money and energy on going to the interview, five minutes of courtesy is not too much to ask. I wonder if any of these interviewers have any memory of what it was like to get their first job. If nothing else, I hope my misery of a job search experience makes me more sensitive if I'm ever in the position to be hiring.

    As long as we're on this subject... what is a reasonable number of people to interview for one position? I don't see any reason to interview 10 people for 1 job unless we're talking about a very high level position. I like to know before I go to an interview if I have a 30% chance of getting this job versus a 10% chance.

    Another question -- I had one job interviewer send me a letter telling me that the position has been filled, but then added a handwritten note saying, "Please keep in touch." Should I take them at their word? Should I let them know I've started working at another job?
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    Quote from LadyFree28
    Most employers do not have the time to contact everyone, and I understand that. On to the next one...
    I don't expect a response stating I haven't been selected if all I've done is apply. But if I get interviewed, a standard form email stating that the position has been filled doesn't seem like too much effort for HR. Tons of people apply, but not everyone is interviewed.

    As a new grad I applied for a hospital's big new grad training program. They field hundreds and hundreds of applications and interview about 200 candidates for about 20 positions. I interviewed, didn't get selected, and got a form email advising me of such. With modern technology, that courtesy really shouldn't put the employer out too much and there are employers out there that DO provide that courtesy.
    dream'n and JeanettePNP like this.
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    Quote from hiddencatRN

    I don't expect a response stating I haven't been selected if all I've done is apply. But if I get interviewed, a standard form email stating that the position has been filled doesn't seem like too much effort for HR. Tons of people apply, but not everyone is interviewed.

    As a new grad I applied for a hospital's big new grad training program. They field hundreds and hundreds of applications and interview about 200 candidates for about 20 positions. I interviewed, didn't get selected, and got a form email advising me of such. With modern technology, that courtesy really shouldn't put the employer out too much and there are employers out there that DO provide that courtesy.
    ^And I'm saying I DON'T...especially these days where they have a pick...I have gotten a email after I did not get a job, or if a job has been cancelled, even after interviews...I don't know where you are located. I'm only speak my perspective, and the places that I applied reasonably AND nationally.

    This is not a tea social...they are fitting numbers and bodies at this point in a crummy economic market. I know the reality. They are not treating it as such, and for me, "on to the next one"...may not be a great fit or a place to work overall, or how about this...maybe here is ONE person sifting through hundreds and THOUSANDS of apps??? Unless YOU (applying to a collective YOU) "stand out" and are "impressive", and are from an organization or school that has a stellar reputation, or you rotated in that org and you networked, they don't give you that "courtesy"...sometimes it's like a poster stated..."they're just not that into YOU...."
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    Quote from amoLucia
    Boy, are you asking for a lot! (Note: am being smarty pants here - not intending to insult anyone!)

    In today's work environment where employers are firing employees at-will without reasons it would be awesome if they gave an explanation. But I wouldn't hold my breath.
    ^Agree....they may NOT even have one...they may have forgotten about you...do you REALLY want to know that??? Ask yourself that...
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    Quote from K+MgSO4
    I always contact staff. Our recruiting program prompts me to edit a generic email to those that have been unsuccessful at each point in the process.

    I did not appreciate the phone call from the woman who applied for a clerk job that was M-Thus non negotiable who had stated in her app that she couldn't work those days. She phoned me, had me on speaker to whoever else was in the room with her and berated me. This was her response to my email stating that she was not successful in her application.
    ^That is AWFUL about that candidate...it seems as though there are more people willing to chase down an employer and load their frustrations out, ESPECIALLY when they have been inflexible...that is truly mind-boggling!!!
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    Quote from WeepingAngel
    I tend to agree with you. It's rude to leave someone hanging, but I dislike this entitled notion. Seems professionalism and courtesy have gone out the window, on both sides of the fence, in most places.
    ^THIS...

    The best coping mechanism in this era is to keep pounding the pavement.

    I applied to a job that had been filled. They called to inform me and actually apologize; a thusly the director of HR did. We got the talking, and landed an interview. They do want me for a position in the company, and I do have a choice...my schedule is hectic, and we mutually agreed to make contact next week to arrange a time to train for a per diem position. I also have constant contact with two recruiters...no position yet. Like I said, "on to the next one..." No job offer, no real "obligation" or courtesy for that matter. If there was a job offer, I would be at orientation now!
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    While I agree that we should not get caught up in ruminating over why we were rejected or how we were treated, there still is a woeful lack of courtesy and professionalism among recruiters/HR professionals, and due to the realities of the job market, they feel they can get away with it. I don't think we need to make excuses for them.
    dream'n, monkeybug, Not_A_Hat_Person, and 1 other like this.


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