What do you think about nurses and PA's being called "Doctor"? - page 5

I am wondering what everyone thinks about Physician Assistants and Nurses with Doctorate degrees being called "Doctor"? I ask because there have been several times in the last few years that I... Read More

  1. Visit  CrunchRN profile page
    1
    It is important though OP. People are justifiably proud of their educational achievements, however, patients need to know if they are talking to an MD or a mid-level provider.

    I think it is wrong in the health care provider arena when you are providing care to address yourself as "doctor" without explaining your role completely. Because to 99% of patients that word means a physician.

    Ok, I am now going to run like _____ for the hills!
    esperanzita likes this.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  SC_RNDude profile page
    0
    Quote from realmaninuniform
    Devil, please do not take this the wrong way, BUT you just said "I earned my title, I have my independent autonomous practice, and I'll fight for both. Why won't you?"

    Last time I checked, NP's must be at the very least, in collaboration with an MD or DO. That kind of detracts from the whole independent, autonomous claim... I don't doubt that you've earned your title,(strange though, we don't refer to CNP's and FNP's who possess the same credentials as you, as doctor) but to say you are completely independent and autonomous is a flat out lie.
    You should be sure you know what your are talking about before calling someone a liar.
  4. Visit  realmaninuniform profile page
    0
    "You should be sure you know what your are talking about before calling someone a liar."

    From the AAFP - "Current Academy policy on NPPs stipulates that these providers should always function under the "direction and responsible supervision" of a practicing, licensed physician though in many states nurse practitioners have independent practice authority." In my state there is no such thing as standalone NP's who are "completely independent and autonomous". While it may be different in your state, I am fairly sure one must at least be in collaboration with a physician, even if it is by something as simple as email.
  5. Visit  myelin profile page
    4
    Quote from realmaninuniform
    "You should be sure you know what your are talking about before calling someone a liar."

    From the AAFP - "Current Academy policy on NPPs stipulates that these providers should always function under the "direction and responsible supervision" of a practicing, licensed physician though in many states nurse practitioners have independent practice authority." In my state there is no such thing as standalone NP's who are "completely independent and autonomous". While it may be different in your state, I am fairly sure one must at least be in collaboration with a physician, even if it is by something as simple as email.
    LOL. What you posted is a press release. You really need to learn more about the NP career. NPs currently have independent (complete autonomous, independent practice and prescribing, NO collaboration necessary) in about ~14 states and are making gains. I believe Devil lives in one of those 14 states, so the statement that Devil is a completely independent provider would actually be very true.

    For your education: Nurse Practitioner Scope of Practice Law Guide | Barton Associates
    Last edit by myelin on Oct 30, '12
    Altra, elkpark, SC_RNDude, and 1 other like this.
  6. Visit  SC_RNDude profile page
    1
    Quote from realmaninuniform
    "You should be sure you know what your are talking about before calling someone a liar."

    From the AAFP - "Current Academy policy on NPPs stipulates that these providers should always function under the "direction and responsible supervision" of a practicing, licensed physician though in many states nurse practitioners have independent practice authority." In my state there is no such thing as standalone NP's who are "completely independent and autonomous". While it may be different in your state, I am fairly sure one must at least be in collaboration with a physician, even if it is by something as simple as email.
    LOL...you've managed to dig your hole deeper.

    The AAFP is no authority on the manner. This is no more then a guideline, or more accurately, a recommendation to their members who happen to employ a NP.
    psu_213 likes this.
  7. Visit  psu_213 profile page
    4
    Quote from myelin
    LOL. What you posted is a press release. You really need to learn more about the NP career. NPs currently have independent (complete autonomous, independent practice, NO collaboration necessary) in about ~14 states and are making gains. I believe Devil lives in one of those 14 states, so the statement that Devil is a completely independent provider would actually be very true.
    And the devil lies in the details

    (sorry)
    BrnEyedGirl, Altra, myelin, and 1 other like this.
  8. Visit  BlueDevil,DNP profile page
    3
    Quote from realmaninuniform
    Devil, please do not take this the wrong way, BUT you just said "I earned my title, I have my independent autonomous practice, and I'll fight for both. Why won't you?"

    Last time I checked, NP's must be at the very least, in collaboration with an MD or DO. That kind of detracts from the whole independent, autonomous claim... I don't doubt that you've earned your title,(strange though, we don't refer to CNP's and FNP's who possess the same credentials as you, as doctor) but to say you are completely independent and autonomous is a flat out lie.
    Ahem, check again, and check every state practice act. You do not know of what you speak and you owe me an apology. Next time, before you attempt to assail my good name and call me a liar, perhaps you ought to have your facts. I work in an independent practice state my good sir. I am in fact, by law, a completely independent provider in every aspect. There is nothing an MD/DO primary care provider can do that I cannot in this state, and need neither oversight or "collaboration," thank you.

    Be very careful about boldly proclaiming to be so sure about that which you are so very clearly misinformed. It will surely create many awkward situations for you.
    Sanuk, psu_213, and myelin like this.
  9. Visit  NRSKarenRN profile page
    1
    As of 2010, 37 states require some form of collaboration, supervision or delegation from a physician for an NP to practice; other 13 states have true independent practice

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation pdf:
    Nurse Practitioner-Physician Collaboration Requirements by State
    esperanzita likes this.
  10. Visit  BlueDevil,DNP profile page
    3
    Quote from CrunchRN
    It is important though OP. People are justifiably proud of their educational achievements, however, patients need to know if they are talking to an MD or a mid-level provider.

    I think it is wrong in the health care provider arena when you are providing care to address yourself as "doctor" without explaining your role completely. Because to 99% of patients that word means a physician.

    Ok, I am now going to run like _____ for the hills!
    I do not disagree with you. I think it should go without saying that every provider should explain to the patient who they are at every encounter until the relationship is clearly established. No one is advocating that patients be misled. However, times change and people are capable of learning. Good grief, I have septuagenarians making e-appointments on smart phones theses days! Explanations can be provided and eventually the public will come to understand. The fact that it will take some education, time and reinforcement is not reason enough to prevent DNPs from using the title they earned, if they choose.
    Altra, psu_213, and NRSKarenRN like this.
  11. Visit  CrunchRN profile page
    0
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    I do not disagree with you. I think it should go without saying that every provider should explain to the patient who they are at every encounter until the relationship is clearly established. No one is advocating that patients be misled. However, times change and people are capable of learning. Good grief, I have septuagenarians making e-appointments on smart phones theses days! Explanations can be provided and eventually the public will come to understand. The fact that it will take some education, time and reinforcement is not reason enough to prevent DNPs from using the title they earned, if they choose.
    I agree with that actually. However, not all are as careful about explaining as needed. Hopefully most will be.
  12. Visit  myelin profile page
    3
    Why is the onus entirely on nurses to be clear about their training and level of education? I see docs introduce medical students as "doctor" to patients in the hospital all the time. How deceptive. Plus, I never see doctors explaining the difference between intern, resident, attending, etc. to the patient. It's not like nurses are these bad people who are coming in and trying to deceive patients. Everyone should be clear about their role and level of education or training. Everyone.
    NRSKarenRN, elkpark, and BlueDevil,DNP like this.
  13. Visit  BlueDevil,DNP profile page
    1
    Agreed.

    I have not personally ever heard a medical student referred to as doctor. That it wholy inappropriate. All of the medical students I have had the opportunity to work with over the years have been gracious and professional, and would never have done that. I have never been around an attending that would have permitted it either. We frequently have medical students in my clinic now too, and without fail, hey are just a pleasure to have around and not one of them would ever deceive a patient in that manner. I think 99% of the medical students and residents out there are bright, inquisitive, humble and eager to fit in and get along in their environments. The other 1% spend their spare time on the internet and make the lot of them look bad.

    That said, my point too, was that every person should explain clearly to the patient who they are and what their role is at every contact, until the relationship is well established.
    Altra likes this.
  14. Visit  realmaninuniform profile page
    1
    Devil, I apologize. Your state is different from mine. From the Ohio Board of Nursing - "In Ohio, the term "advanced practice nurse" refers to someone that is a certified nurse practitioner, certified nurse- midwife, certified registered nurse anesthetist, or a clinical nurse specialist. All advance practice nurses in Ohio must practice under the rules of the Ohio State Board of Nursing.Each individual is required to be certified by a National Certifying Organization approved by the Ohio Board of Nursing and possess a Certificate of Authority (COA) to practice in their field. APN's in Ohio do have prescribing privileges for most drugs, however, certain controlled substances cannot be prescribed without the collaboration of a physician. Every APN must practice under the supervision of a physician in the state. They do not have to be in direct contact with the physician, but they must be able to communicate/consult with him or her at all times either in person, over the phone, via the internet, etc."

    I came across this as I was doing some research of my own into becoming a NP, and it made me think of this post. Hence the month long delay in response.

    To myelin - 14 states? That is your argument? There are 36 others that DO require physician collaboration. I may have been in error in Devil's case, but for the vast majority of the country, it is the law. And if you actually read my post I said "It may be different in your state".

    Also, to Devil, a question - Are you permitted to prescribe any and all controlled substances on your own, or does that require collaboration? I get that certain states allow stand alone NP's, but it seems that they still need physician collaboration to prescribe certain controlled substances in most states. Just curious as to your situation.
    esperanzita likes this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

Top