Should human organs be for sale? - page 3

Posted on Sat, Sep. 21, 2002 Miami Herald BY JOHN DORSCHNER jdorschner@herald.com Michael Ritchie, 45, has spent two months ''hooked to a lot of machines'' in a Jackson Memorial Hospital... Read More

  1. by   LasVegasRN
    Originally posted by montroyal
    This quote really bothers me. First, I do not believe in organ procurement. This is how I feel. If someone wants to donate, thats their belief and I respect that. As an ICU nurse, I report to the state organ procurement as required by law, but I never encourage a pt or patients family to donate. If they ask for information, I will arrange for the procurement agency to have someone speak with them. Its then up to them to decide.

    Second, the pro life organizations would love to see a law in which the government has control over a persons body. This is not to say I believe in their views, but I believe no one has the right to dictate what happens to me. End of life decisions are the last thing on a young persons mind. Do you really expect a twenty year old to have thought out if they want to be an organ donor. Retrieving organs is a surgical procedure, and no one has the right to have this forced on them. I feel it is up to the individual. If a person has decided to be an organ donor, then their wishes should be followed. If the person has not made their wishes known, what gives anyone the right to subject a person to a surgical procedure they did not agree to. This even includes family members. Anyone who has thought the options out and wants to be a donor should be the ones who need to write out their intentions. Everone else should be left alone.
    My question to you would be, if you were in a situation where YOU needed an organ, why should you be considered above one who DOES believe in donating organs? Or would you refuse to accept the organ you need based on your beliefs and accept your death?
  2. by   dianthe1013
    My parents used to have a hard time accepting the fact that I am an organ donor. Organ donation - giving and, yes, receiving - was at odds with their religious and personal convictions.

    It was and is not against mine.

    I had to repeatedly discuss this issue with them, to make certain they were aware of my wishes. Finally, I got them to acknowledge that, if the time ever comes, they will support me in death as they did in life.

    Oddly enough, I did this finally by asking whether they would want someone to give this wonderful gift for me or my younger sister. That changed their tune, and made them look at organ donation in a whole new light. To them, it's no longer "a gross thing to think about"; it's saving a life, or maybe even lives.

    And by the way, montroyal -- I made the decision to be an organ donor when I was 19. So yes, younger people DO think about this sort of thing.

    Donna
  3. by   LasVegasRN
    Kudos to you, Donna!!
  4. by   whipping girl in 07
    I recently read an article in Playboy about organ donation, and it said something similar to Renee's post about harvesting organs from people showing signs of life.

    It did not change my mind about organ donation; I'm still a registered organ donor and so is my husband. But it was something to think about. It would not surprise me that overzealous doctors/OPAs might prematurely take organs from a "not-really-sure-if-he's-brain-dead" patient. The article stated that this is more common at transplant centers rather than hospitals who harvest the organs and then send them to the transplant center.

    I know it has brought some peace to family members who have lost a loved one in a senseless accident to be able to save other people's lives. I feel that our neurologists/neurosurgeons seem to err on the side of caution when it comes to calling a patient brain-dead, whether the patient/family wants the organs donated or not.

    The first patient I ever cared for that died, I approached the family about donating his corneas. They were surprised that someone as old as him that had had cancer would be able to donate anything at all. They thought about it and then came back and told me that nothing would have made Daddy happier than to help someone see. I think it helped ease their pain a little knowing that they did something that helped someone else.

    I don't think they should be sold, but maybe some funeral expenses could be offset by organ/tissue donation. Or the estate could get a tax credit?
  5. by   Rustyhammer
    My 15 year old just got her driving permit and when they asked if she wanted to be an organ donor she said "Yes" without hesitation (I was pleased). I agree that all should be donors automatically unless they sign that they do not wish it.
    What type of religion is it that is against the gift of life??
    Perhaps cloning should be persued as a source of organs. (Where is that under chair smiley?)
    I would take a cloned organ? Wouldn't you?
    -Russell
  6. by   Vsummer1
    Originally posted by Rustyhammer
    My 15 year old just got her driving permit and when they asked if she wanted to be an organ donor she said "Yes" without hesitation (I was pleased). I agree that all should be donors automatically unless they sign that they do not wish it.
    What type of religion is it that is against the gift of life??
    Perhaps cloning should be persued as a source of organs. (Where is that under chair smiley?)
    I would take a cloned organ? Wouldn't you?
    -Russell
    They are working on it... doing pretty well I think too. That would be ideal because you wouldn't have to take immunosuppresant drugs for life if you used your own tissue to grow a new heart, liver, kidney etc. I see nothing wrong with the cloning of parts... it is cloning the whole enchilada (or just the brain) that gets a bit weird IMO.
  7. by   semstr
    A dead body is not a person any longer, and a dead body doesn't belong to family. It is not possible to make a will about your dead body belonging to your wife or something.
    And it isn't possible to do with a corpse whatever you want. Nor is it allowed to throw the ashes from a boat of plane or something. The Ashes have to be put away, in an extra part of a cemetry.
    (Looks a bit like a big pottery shop in fact)
    That is the federal law here.
    Of course family decides about the funeral, which cemetry and so on.
    And yes, I know a lot of young people thinking and talking about transplantation. (No only my young students, but others too)
    Renee
  8. by   sjoe
    Renee--that was my question.

    To whom or what does a corpse belong? Now obviously, like Ted Williams, you can decide, while alive, who can be in charge of freezing you; or you can specify a crematorium to burn you up, etc. Some states allow bodies to be buried on a family's private property, etc. If a university to which someone has willed his corpse doesn't own it, then how could it be able to cut it up and dispose of it? And be paid by the students for the privilege of doing so?

    On the other hand, when a corpse is abused (e.g. the ashes disposed of or just stacked in a room somewhere in opposition to the deceased's wishes), it is the family that can initiate a civil lawsuit to collect damages, which implies that the family owns it.

    Maybe all these questions are up to each state to decide, I don't know, but if so, then why couldn't each state decide whether organs could be bought and sold? If one can sell his plasma when alive, why not organs afterwards?

    Perhaps some attorney will read this thread and let us all know.
  9. by   sanakruz
    I think education about the need, awareness about third world horrors and sucess stories is the ticket. In a word -Propaganda! I'm also learning toward implied consent- With some cultural sensitivity in place maybe? Many indigenous north american people find this apalling- shudder at embalming and have real hard times with amputations. I'm going to have to think about this more. Intriguing article,ThanX!
  10. by   sanakruz
    sjoe- I think the scandal of the crematorium abusing corpses led to law suits for breach of contract as the expectation was that your loved one would be laid to rest for eternity and this obvious didnt occur, causing mental anguish-I dont think the issue of owner ship came up- and therein may be the key-except maybe with minors... Hmmm
  11. by   frankie
    Hi everyone - frankie here - My personal opinion is NO WAY; no way should organs be allowed to become a market item. We have enough discrimination in our health care system now - we do not need to add to the problems. Also, as the social strati become ever more further apart, this would accelerate that process. frankie
  12. by   sanakruz
    Konni-Ihope that article you read in playboy was in the FICTION section- cant say i read that periodical much, but have often heatrd others say they read "for the articles"...
  13. by   sanakruz
    Frankie- I agree

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