NURSING...the to die for career...hmm - page 6

by lkulmann 9,678 Views | 93 Comments

Teachers, Police, Firefighters, Military, Government City/State and Nursing. What do they all have in common? Early Retirement Benefits! Whoopsies...all except for nursing. Whatsup with THAT.... Anyone?... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from lkulmann
    Well this is my logic. First, many public first responders and healthcare workers have that early retirement pension. Nursing fits nicely into that category. It doesn't mean you retire at that age, you collect at retirement age. The second reason and more important IMO, is getting the old dead wood management staff out and the senior nurses out after training the new grad nurses. Keeps it moving growing evolving... science changes.There are new grad that need jobs leaving posts everywhere on this site. They can't get hired BC they have no experience...that's laughable. Old staff out new staff in.

    Wow. That isn't the answer I was expecting. I'm not sure what to think. As a 40ish, relatively new nurse, it has been a rare time I have run into "dead-wood" in my nursing career.

    Myabe I can help you "grow and evolve" a bit?

    Where do you think those public employees get their pensions from? You do realize that you and me are paying for it?

    How do you think private employers would provide pensions? They would have to cut wages and other benefits.

    I would rather not provide for someone else's retirement (ie. public employees) and would prefer to keep my wages and benefits and be responsible for my own retirement plan.
  2. 3
    Why have we allowed ourselves to succumb to the "us vs. them" mentality of the political parties?
    All of us lower and middle classers are in the same boat...scrapping for an every shrinking piece of the American dollar
  3. 1
    Quote from lkulmann
    Soon well be coming to work with our own benefits, Obamacare. Why not our own union with pension, early retirement and labor law protection....I'm loving this idea more and more it could definetly work!
    I'm not sure where you got this notion from, but you misunderstand the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Once the act takes effect, you will continue to receive health insurance through your employer. In fact, the act requires that employers with X number of FTEs (I believe the number is 50, in MA the number is 10) provide health insurance to their employees and penalizes those who do not. Your employer won't all of a sudden stop paying into health insurance for its employees and then all of a sudden have extra money to contribute to early retirement benefits. Plus, the PPACA does nothing for any of the other benefits you get through your employer such as dental insurance, paid time off, life insurance, short term and long term disability insurance, healthcare reimbursement accounts, etc. so no, you won't be "coming to work with your own benefits."
    Esme12 likes this.
  4. 0
    Quote from tewdles
    Why have we allowed ourselves to succumb to the "us vs. them" mentality of the political parties?
    All of us lower and middle classers are in the same boat...scrapping for an every shrinking piece of the American dollar
    ^This!!!
  5. 0
    Quote from SC_RNDude

    Wow. That isn't the answer I was expecting. I'm not sure what to think. As a 40ish, relatively new nurse, it has been a rare time I have run into "dead-wood" in my nursing career.

    Myabe I can help you "grow and evolve" a bit?

    Where do you think those public employees get their pensions from? You do realize that you and me are paying for it?

    How do you think private employers would provide pensions? They would have to cut wages and other benefits.

    I would rather not provide for someone else's retirement (ie. public employees) and would prefer to keep my wages and benefits and be responsible for my own retirement plan.


    I plan to "semi retire" in 30 years.

    I don't get the concept of what the OP's ideas either are when there are systems in place that can be improved, and the whole "rotation" of nurses, decreases healthy skill mix...
  6. 0
    As far as 'typical' abuses, there are laws for that. In the past three years, I have been reimbursed from previous employers for not reimbursing for OT, missed lunches, etc. WITHOUT a union. For jobs I had over five years ago. Don't like your working conditions? Call the labor board and make a formal complaint; if they are many who want make a formal complaint, there's strength in numbers.
    Yes, times are changing, HOWEVER, this can be done at a political level. Laws can and always been in place. It is always a CHOICE to have a voice.
    Wouldn't it be nice to NOT have to call the Labor Dept for missed OT, missed lunches and etc...have you EVER actually changed any policies at the political level? Typical abuses should even be able to be used in the same sentence, but there are many. I stand my ground... nurses need to expect and demand better
  7. 0
    Quote from KelRN215

    I'm not sure where you got this notion from, but you misunderstand the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Once the act takes effect, you will continue to receive health insurance through your employer. In fact, the act requires that employers with X number of FTEs (I believe the number is 50, in MA the number is 10) provide health insurance to their employees and penalizes those who do not. Your employer won't all of a sudden stop paying into health insurance for its employees and then all of a sudden have extra money to contribute to early retirement benefits. Plus, the PPACA does nothing for any of the other benefits you get through your employer such as dental insurance, paid time off, life insurance, short term and long term disability insurance, healthcare reimbursement accounts, etc. so no, you won't be "coming to work with your own benefits."
    The ACA is set up differently in different States. In my State you can purchase a plan through the Exchanges that will offer several plans. Actually it looks like there is a nurses union that is growing quickly called the NNU that has: some of the same visions I have. If nurses band together on a National Level we get to demand better care for us AND our patients. There is power in numbers This is exciting!
  8. 0
    Quote from SC_RNDude

    Wow. That isn't the answer I was expecting. I'm not sure what to think. As a 40ish, relatively new nurse, it has been a rare time I have run into "dead-wood" in my nursing career.

    Myabe I can help you "grow and evolve" a bit?

    Where do you think those public employees get their pensions from? You do realize that you and me are paying for it?

    How do you think private employers would provide pensions? They would have to cut wages and other benefits.

    I would rather not provide for someone else's retirement (ie. public employees) and would prefer to keep my wages and benefits and be responsible for my own retirement plan.
    When there are a group of nurses that have a mixture of new nurses and seasoned 20+yr nurses, that is a large diverse pool of nursing skills! Sounds like your still a little green SC and a national union that is OPTIONAL would be ideal for you
  9. 0
    Quote from lkulmann
    Wouldn't it be nice to NOT have to call the Labor Dept for missed OT, missed lunches and etc...have you EVER actually changed any policies at the political level? Typical abuses should even be able to be used in the same sentence, but there are many. I stand my ground... nurses need to expect and demand better
    ^It IS nice not to call the labor board. Again, missed lunches are dependent and relative...Where I work, there is constant staff turnover because of the patients we take care of...it can be emotionally draining, yet, everyone is able to take lunch, even though we are short staffed.

    I am very active in my state, and have worked with those individuals that have proposed improvements in practice. I am aware of the political process. I am also not proposing no skill mix, forcing people to retire, and I COMMAND RESPECT and have done so for the past 10+ years in healthcare, and have enjoyed my profession, and have gotten the respect I am supposed to. Nurses are empowering and never felt like I never had power. That may be the other issue that you may be struggling with, but don't lump others who KNOW the political power that we carry. His about YOU speak to those nursing individuals and join those orgs, instead of questing what I have done?? What have YOU done?

    These 'abuses' are also not solely in nursing as well. Corporate structure is in every profession, and are trying to cut corners. I'm satisfied with the structures in place, such as the labor board-another union creation, which is effective.

    Again, having a voice is a CHOICE, and for the posters who are "enlightening" including myself are empowered enough to KNOW the process, as well as giving you examples in the process.

    Have YOU fully assessed what is in place?

    If you feel as though it is not "good enough," carry on, but for every proposal you have, there is something in place to be used, as well as for you to take it upon yourself to get your breaks, say NO to OT, and be empowered in your profession.

    If you have the attitude that nurses ARE empowering, as I have, given the knowledge and the geographical area I live in as nurse DO the work, and are respected, then a lot of what you propose would be less, rather than more to the profession, ESPECIALLY your proposal to push our "experts" out of the field, since healthcare is a fluid, evolving profession.
  10. 0
    Quote from lkulmann
    The ACA is set up differently in different States. In my State you can purchase a plan through the Exchanges that will offer several plans. Actually it looks like there is a nurses union that is growing quickly called the NNU that has: some of the same visions I have. If nurses band together on a National Level we get to demand better care for us AND our patients. There is power in numbers This is exciting!
    Why would you want to purchase health insurance on your own and pay more for an inferior plan if you have the choice to get better benefits through your employer? And actually, all states are required to have these exchanges but this will not be the way the majority of people obtain health insurance. I am from the state that's healthcare reform law was the basis for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act- the exchange is set up for people who are self-employed or cannot get health insurance through their job. Even the cheapest plans on my state's health connector cost significantly more than the expensive plan I had through my last job and cover way less. I am not even eligible to purchase health insurance through this exchange because I am eligible for benefits through my employer. So your idea that "we'll all be coming to work with our own benefits" is still false. Employers will still be the primary method through which most people obtain health insurance.

    The NNU's vision is not to have individual nurses join and set up their own contracts with their employers.


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