I am watching Michael Moore's "Sicko" for the first time.... I am watching Michael Moore's "Sicko" for the first time.... - pg.20 | allnurses

I am watching Michael Moore's "Sicko" for the first time.... - page 26

And I am just blown away. I am incredulous. I have felt for a while that we should have universal health care here in the US, but I didn't know things were this bad. We really should be ashamed... Read More

  1. Visit  leadesign profile page
    2
    patients that do doctors in other nations.

    ...is now available for a limited time on dvd
    talaxandra and Honnte et Srieux like this.
  2. Visit  Hekate profile page
    2
    Quote from hillarypeace2006
    from my own personal experience with national healthcare in austria, i encountered an ob who i felt was less than competent and it was well known, however, he was never asked to step down from his post of head of the department. instead pts through word of mouth were told to avoid him. my concern especially in the us is that these types will have no problem getting and retaining contracts to provide care, and like with current medicaid programs foreign trained physicians will hold the majority of the contracts while the rest will become "private" providers.

    i think that yes we have to look at tort reform, but responsible tort reform. i don't think it unreasonable for people to expect monetary remedy for actions of gross negligence. on the bright side if the govt serves as the offending party instead of the invidual physician, there would be probably be an overall cost reduction because of over the top medical malpractice.

    my husband, a surgeon is finding that it will be very difficult to practice solely because of malpractice rates alone. this is becoming a harsh reality for people who specialize.
    i think that what you have encountered with this ob head of dept is something we all experience regardless of the health system in place (unfortunately) .
    i have worked with the head of trauma for 2 years and this surgeon was known for making the most horrible mistakes! when patients have asked me if he was good, i tried to make tons of compliments about another surgeon that i knew was good without bashing the head of trauma in the hope to steer patients away from his incompetent hands.
    i often wondered why he was still in place~ not only was he a bad surgeon~ but he also had the worse character and working with him meant being regularly insulted, yelled at, not to mention trying to tie the loose ends after him.
    i was told that the reason he remained in his job was because a) no one else wanted to be the head of trauma (too much trouble, paper work, calls etc) and b) because he was on every possible board (general surgery, trauma, ems, political boards, hospital boards etc..) and therefore was so embedded in the social and professional network that nobody felt safe to point out his short comings. to my knowledge, several law suits were made against him, but again, his position within the political, medical and social network of this community protected and defended him to ever be judged guilty!
    and this is happening in our us sue-happy system.....
    :lol_hitti
    herring_RN and hillarypeace2006 like this.
  3. Visit  talaxandra profile page
    3
    Quote from hillarypeace2006
    My concern especially in the US is that these types will have no problem getting and retaining contracts to provide care, and like with current medicaid programs foreign trained physicians will hold the majority of the contracts While the rest will become "private" providers.
    All the consultants I know who work privately (either medical or surgical) also work within the public health care system. While I'm sure they exist, I'm not aware of many consultants for whom this is not the case.

    While there are certainly cases of unsafe practitioners not being removed early (Jayant Patel being the most notable example), I believe this has much more to do with protective culture than the source of funding.

    I hgree with those of you who've mentioned litigation as a significant contributor to US healthcare cost. I have idemnity insurance ($2M) as part of my union membership, along with free legal advice and representation, but I doubt I'll need the former and anticipate that the only use I'll have for the latter would be employment- rather than litigation-related - in twenty years of clinical practice nobody I know (nursing or medical) has been individually sued. I don't mean taken to court, I mean any kind of overture of legal action. Even the threat "I'll sue!" is rare.

    This doesn't mean, as someone claimed ages ago on this thread, that patients who've been harmed are unable to sue but the cases I've heard of where patients claimed against the hospital as an entity were settled out of court (always legitimate claims, like the patient with diabetic neuropathy who received significant burns from a hot pack placed directly agaisnt her ankle).
    herring_RN, XB9S, and hillarypeace2006 like this.
  4. Visit  hillarypeace2006 profile page
    2
    Quote from talaxandra
    All the consultants I know who work privately (either medical or surgical) also work within the public health care system. While I'm sure they exist, I'm not aware of many consultants for whom this is not the case.

    While there are certainly cases of unsafe practitioners not being removed early (Jayant Patel being the most notable example), I believe this has much more to do with protective culture than the source of funding.

    I hgree with those of you who've mentioned litigation as a significant contributor to US healthcare cost. I have idemnity insurance ($2M) as part of my union membership, along with free legal advice and representation, but I doubt I'll need the former and anticipate that the only use I'll have for the latter would be employment- rather than litigation-related - in twenty years of clinical practice nobody I know (nursing or medical) has been individually sued. I don't mean taken to court, I mean any kind of overture of legal action. Even the threat "I'll sue!" is rare.

    This doesn't mean, as someone claimed ages ago on this thread, that patients who've been harmed are unable to sue but the cases I've heard of where patients claimed against the hospital as an entity were settled out of court (always legitimate claims, like the patient with diabetic neuropathy who received significant burns from a hot pack placed directly agaisnt her ankle).
    Thanks for the information. Americans are quite litigious not so much out of greed but because of the corporate structure of 95% of what we do in our everyday lives. Accountability is a real issue here and that has historically been the best method for taking folks to task.
    talaxandra and lindarn like this.
  5. Visit  StNeotser profile page
    3
    My problem with the US health system is that most of us of working age are contributing the hard earned dollars to health care. However, it's most likely that we will use the most health care dollars within five years of our deaths. So, we are contributing to private industry all our working lives (providing we have no pre-existing conditions - what losers those people are!), then taking from the taxpayer when we are retired. Nice.
    blue note, herring_RN, and lindarn like this.

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