An RN's thoughts on the health care law - page 5

I've been following the debate about the health care law and it seems like most commenters are totally for it or adamantly against it. I've been watching my family, friends, and patients face bad... Read More

  1. Visit  lamazeteacher} profile page
    1
    "That being said, there are fixes needed for our healthcare system. However, there are much better ways of doing it then universal healthcare." end quoteYou have to start somewhere, and a lot of negotiating was done (I want this, so I'll give you that, type of thing) to get the Affordable Healthcare Act passed!It is far more, and very much less than "Universal healthcare"! People who are insured now, through their employers will continue that, as before. Only premiums set by insurance companies will reflect burdensome situations such as childbearing, and at present those premiums are lowest for women in their childbearing years. No higher rates may be charged for individual differences, (such as seniors over 55 years of age, and those who have "pre-existing conditions").Nurses will have enlarged capacities and greater opportunities with the healthcare that includes preventive care. I imagine the writer of the post criticizing and taking great assumptions of herring's viewpoint, hasn't read the Affordable Healthcare Act. I have, and nowhere does it place any additional burden on taxpayers other than the 1% whose obligation of 5% on income over $250,000/ year, will hardly be felt by them. The Republican platform financed by megacorporations (not individuals, but a conglomeration of "good old boys" that includes few women) hardly reflects interests of the majority of voters. It does support the sway of big business, a faction that hates paying any income tax, directs their profit making industries to create jobs away from our country and keeps their funds in non taxable accounts offshore!Liberal and conservative leaning individuals can be seen in both parties. I think the exposure of that, and the way the tax laws have been manipulated by the rich for the rich, is a good thing. Like an infection brewing undetected, it had to be brought to view so that once seen, it can be eradicated. It's not the Affordable Healthcare Act that is the culprit here, it's the tax evading rich who victimize the middle class and the poverty stricken! Very few charities benefit us, who have little time or money to go to Art Galleries and theatrical Broadway stage productions!When someone as rich as a Gates forces their philanthropy to benefit others who have less, that makes news.
    herring_RN likes this.
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  3. Visit  lamazeteacher} profile page
    1
    I tried to edit my comment to make reading it easier, but the system here refused to allow that time consuming effort....
    herring_RN likes this.
  4. Visit  Susie2310} profile page
    1
    I just read an article in Bloomberg (July 24) titled "High Court Ruling to Increase Uninsured: CBO says."
    SC_RNDude likes this.
  5. Visit  SC_RNDude} profile page
    3
    Oh lamazeteacher. So much I could say about your posts. I'll just stick with the most recent.

    "You have to start somewhere, and a lot of negotiating was done (I want this, so I'll give you that, type of thing) to get the Affordable Healthcare Act passed!"

    Yes. there was quite a bit of negotiating. However, little of it had to do with improving healthcare. It was all about getting the best deal they could in exchange for votes.
    Payoffs for states get Harry Reid to 60 votes - Chris Frates - POLITICO.com

    Along those lines, Obama promised several times that debate on healthcare would include doctors, nurses, healthcare administrators, insurance companies, etc. and would be televised. That never happened. PolitiFact | The Obameter: Negotiate health care reform in public sessions televised on C-SPAN

    "I imagine the writer of the post criticizing and taking great assumptions of herring's viewpoint, hasn't read the Affordable Healthcare Act. I have..."

    I wish I had a dollar for everytime I heard a liberal (including the President) imply that since my opinion is different then theirs, I must not understand. And, you have read the law? Seriously? Very impressed. And disturbed at the same time.

    "People who are insured now, through their employers will continue that, as before."

    Only until their employer quits offering insurance. Or, goes out of business.
    Nearly 10% of employers to drop health benefits, survey finds - latimes.com

    "No higher rates may be charged for individual differences, (such as seniors over 55 years of age, and those who have "pre-existing conditions")"

    That's how it is now. And that is actually something that should be changed. Since insurance companies can't charge more, they do everything they can to avoid high-risk customers altogther. If they charged based on risk like all other forms of insurance, and if people had long-term relationships with their insurance company (not tied to their job), premiums would be lower and more people would be covered.

    "I have, and nowhere does it place any additional burden on taxpayers other than the 1% whose obligation of 5% on income over $250,000/ year, will hardly be felt by them."

    So, who is to decide that "it will hardly be felt by them"? And we should make policy by this standard? What happens when the government decides you can do with less then what you have earned, and when they take more you will hardly feel it?

    "The Republican platform financed by megacorporations (not individuals, but a conglomeration of "good old boys" that includes few women) hardly reflects interests of the majority of voters."

    I bet that more people identify with people running businesses then they do with the Hollywood and media people who are financing the President's campaign.

    I could go on about that statement and others you make regarding the rich, the middle-class, etc., but that would be going off topic and taking up more of my time then I care to spend on that.

    Oh, one more thing. The rich are the only ones benefitting from the charities that they contribute to??? Lol! Please name some of those charities. I would love to know more about them.
  6. Visit  SC_RNDude} profile page
    2
    [QUOTE=lamazeteacher;6687317
    Read the law (certainly not as difficult or illegible to non lawyers as some would have you believe, and Republicans' alternate proposal is) and you'll know that, don't just
    adopt the opinion of someone else
    who hasn't read it!.[/QUOTE]

    Would you mind pointing me to the Republicans' alternate proposal? Maybe provide a link. I know of many great ideas floating about, but I wasn't aware there was a formal proposal out, and I can't find it. It really must be something if the current law (over 2300 pages) is not difficult to read, but the Republicans' is!
  7. Visit  herring_RN} profile page
    0
    Before i was old enough for Medicare my employer changed insurance companies. My long time physician was not a preferred provider.
    This had nothing to do with the affordable care act because the act had not yet passed.
  8. Visit  silentRN} profile page
    3
    I really don't see how any of this will be paid for...how do we expect to enroll some what, 30 million Americans on Medicaid, when state by state the healthcare systems are already broke and vanishing. In Az, there are no new enrollments allowed for childless adults into Medicaid, and even if you do have a child, they can only fall under one of the four categories for the adult to receive Medicaid benefits. If we expect that everything will be federalized and are duped into believing that the Federal government will pay for this mess, then think again. We are so broke as a nation that we can't continue to deficit spend to keep these programs afloat and sustain for much longer. As poverty rises in the US year by year, more people become reliant on some form of government benefit. As of this year, there are 100 million Americans that are considered living in the poverty level. When Obama took office, there were 32 million Americans on food stamps, that number has risen to 45 million. I believe as of right now 1 in 4 or 1 in 5 Americans are on Medicaid. Let's be realistic. We all work in the healthcare system, and we all see how bad it really is. Just to pass a bill for the sake of passing a bill isn't a good way to run a nation, especially a nation who is engulfed in debt.

    What is the solution? I'm not sure if there really is a solution anymore. It's like when someone buys a house, and they are so far behind in mortgage payments that they just can't get ahead. They use one credit card to pay off the next, while at the same adding more debt to the credit card. This is the kind of rut that this nation is in, and it wouldn't make sense to take out another loan to make additions to the house would it? At this point, I believe we as a nation have crossed the thin red line and there is no going back from here, until one day it just finally comes down us.
  9. Visit  Susie2310} profile page
    1
    Quote from Susie2310
    I just read an article in Bloomberg (July 24) titled "High Court Ruling to Increase Uninsured: CBO says."
    I hope I am wrong, but I am concerned about the people who will not be able to get Medicaid, and the people who will lose employer sponsored medical care. The costs of individual policies have already gone up horrendously. I am hoping for the best, but I am fearing the worst.
    CountyRat likes this.
  10. Visit  herring_RN} profile page
    0
    We Still Need Medicare For All --
    http://www.thenation.com/blog/168649...d-medicare-all
  11. Visit  SC_RNDude} profile page
    0
    Quote from herring_RN
    As it is now, about a third of those who are eligible are not enrolled. With the AHA, more will be eligible, but a even higher % is expected to not enroll.
    Understanding Participation Rates in Medicaid: Implications for the Affordable Care Act: ASPE Issue Brief
  12. Visit  Susie2310} profile page
    0
    Quote from SC_RNDude
    As it is now, about a third of those who are eligible are not enrolled. With the AHA, more will be eligible, but a even higher % is expected to not enroll.
    Understanding Participation Rates in Medicaid: Implications for the Affordable Care Act:* ASPE Issue Brief
    I just clicked on the link to this article and noticed the date at the bottom is 3/16/12 if I remember correctly. The Supreme Court ruled on the Health Care Act in June. So I am thinking, as I read in Bloomberg, that with the Supreme Court Ruling now not requiring states to expand Medicaid, that actually fewer people than this article projected will be expected to enroll.
  13. Visit  herring_RN} profile page
    0
    A nurse who volunteered in Houston after Katrina and Rita told me what she and fellow volunteers did after the Astrodome refugees were gone.

    They went into the east Texas piney wood hills where people were living in the yard because their roof had blown off and it was raining in the house.
    With a church group the nurses, including NPs found old people with undiagnosed HTN, diabetes, and other illnesses. They didn't even know they could get Medicare or Social Security. They were treated at their homes, those who were willing were taken to a shelter. All were so very relieved that they could get some healthcare.

    With the help of volunteers from various churches their roofs were replaced. These volunteer nurses truly helped those people.
  14. Visit  Susie2310} profile page
    0
    Quote from herring_RN
    A nurse who volunteered in Houston after Katrina and Rita told me what she and fellow volunteers did after the Astrodome refugees were gone.

    They went into the east Texas piney wood hills where people were living in the yard because their roof had blown off and it was raining in the house.
    With a church group the nurses, including NPs found old people with undiagnosed HTN, diabetes, and other illnesses. They didn't even know they could get Medicare or Social Security. They were treated at their homes, those who were willing were taken to a shelter. All were so very relieved that they could get some healthcare.

    With the help of volunteers from various churches their roofs were replaced. These volunteer nurses truly helped those people.
    I think it is wonderful that these nurses and NP's were able to help these people.

    I am guessing that the NP's were self-employed practitioners. I am just wondering about the issues of malpractice coverage for the nurses and NP's involved. I know that my professional liability policy didn't cover me for volunteer nursing. I would not provide volunteer nursing services to the general public without professional liability coverage: I would only act within the limits of the Good Samaritan Act, unless I was employed by a group such as the Red Cross.


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