Three Clicks of a Mouse - page 3

by VivaLasViejas 4,996 Views | 29 Comments Guide

As those who study the social habits of humans have observed, Internet forums are a reflection of society as a whole, no matter how exclusive the community. And as the spate of recent threads here on Allnurses indicates, the... Read More


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    Great article Viva! And yes, these outrageous displays of a nurses' very personal information often results in delays in getting help. In SC, not only can this info easily be found on the BON's website, the sanction/discipline/surrender is automatically published in the state's nursing magazine (which is mailed out by the NA to every licensed nurse). I understand the need to protect the public and the concept of their "right" to know certain things. But anyone (INCLUDING a nurse) who is under a doctor's care IS a patient. And shouldn't every patient have an expectation of confidentiality regarding their diagnosis or other health information. I believe that the public should be able to know any professional's licensure status, but they do not need to know medical specifics. By releasing these details, what 'public good' is being accomplished, and how does this 'aide' the nurse in any way? Seems like double standards to me. Just sayin'...
    anotherone, poppycat, and VivaLasViejas like this.
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    Thank you for sharing this article. It makes one reflect about things that are happening around us and what can we do as nurses.
    anotherone and VivaLasViejas like this.
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    In my experience in several different nursing programs over the years, as a student and then as a faculty member, I have seen schools bend over backwards to assist students with emotional/psychiatric difficulties to identify resources available to them to get help and to continue to progress in school.

    In my diploma nursing program decades ago, faculty had to come to in the middle of the night to talk a student out of jumping off the dorm roof three times before they finally told her she couldn't come back after the leave of absence she took each time. I have personally been involved in assisting students with getting mental health help and staying in school a few times. I've never (personally) encountered a situation in which a nursing program was quick or arbitrary about "weeding out" a student because of mental health issues.

    What I have seen is that schools tend to be very good at respecting students' privacy about these issues, to the extent that most students in a program have no idea of how many students are having problems and being helped by their programs -- they are only aware of the few students who are unable to continue in school, and think that those individuals are the entire population of students having difficulties, and the school has a "no tolerance" sort of policy, when, again, in my personal experience, exactly the opposite has been true.

    The BONs, on the other hand, have a primary responsibility to regulate nursing licensure and practice to protect the public, not to help nurses. I don't feel they are out of line in the degree to which they do that. I do have problems with private information being unnecessarily released to the public. However, in the larger sense, we all agreed, by entering a licensed profession/occupation, to be held to a different, higher standard than the general public, and to accept a greater responsibility to the public than "regular people." That is a price of being licensed, and people should think long and hard about that before entering a licensed profession/occupation.
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    Quote from elkpark
    In my diploma nursing program decades ago, faculty had to come to in the middle of the night to talk a student out of jumping off the dorm roof three times before they finally told her she couldn't come back after the leave of absence she took each time. I have personally been involved in assisting students with getting mental health help and staying in school a few times. I've never (personally) encountered a situation in which a nursing program was quick or arbitrary about "weeding out" a student because of mental health issues.

    However, in the larger sense, we all agreed, by entering a licensed profession/occupation, to be held to a different, higher standard than the general public, and to accept a greater responsibility to the public than "regular people." That is a price of being licensed, and people should think long and hard about that before entering a licensed profession/occupation.
    The story you told is an awfully extreme example, elkpark. It doesn't do justice to the large # of well-managed professionals with mental illness. I do agree that we should be held to a higher standard. For me, that means I am both personally and professionally obligated to be compliant with my treatment regimen and take care of my personal health. It does not mean I should not be a nurse.
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
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    Quote from mariebailey
    The story you told is an awfully extreme example, elkpark. It doesn't do justice to the large # of well-managed professionals with mental illness. I do agree that we should be held to a higher standard. For me, that means I am both personally and professionally obligated to be compliant with my treatment regimen and take care of my personal health. It does not mean I should not be a nurse.
    My point was definitely not that people with mental illnesses shouldn't be nurses -- just that we shouldn't be surprised at being held to a higher standard and closer scrutiny that people in other occupations, and nursing schools make a greater effort than most nurses realize to work with students who are having difficulties. I have known any number of great nurses over the years who had large or small struggles with different kinds of mental health issues, including myself. The purpose of that particular anecdote was to show how far the school had gone in trying to help her continue in the program.
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    I agree, Marie. Elk, I have a feeling you went to school a while back. It's not like that now.
    mariebailey likes this.
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    Quote from wish_me_luck
    I agree, Marie. Elk, I have a feeling you went to school a while back. It's not like that now.
    I did go to school "a while back" (~30 years ago). But I've taught in nursing programs within the last several years.
    tyvin likes this.
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    Quote from mariebailey
    I do agree that we should be held to a higher standard. For me, that means I am both personally and professionally obligated to be compliant with my treatment regimen and take care of my personal health.
    Ditto for me. However, that does not mean a nurse's private health information needs to be available to the public, which is my original point.
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    We need to eliminate this unfair "witch hunt" of ones that have psychiatric illnesses. The medical field, of all places, should be a place of understanding and acceptance. Persons diagnosed with a psychiatric illness that is cared for with medications are no more a public threat than the person diagnosed with a physical illness. It makes me wonder if all the studies, statistics, and break-through care for the psychiatrically ill is even believed by the very ones that are in the field of this speciality. In our society a person that states he/she is mental ill is going to be an ostracized from the very ones that claim to want to support and help them. Until we accept persons with their unique mental issues we are going to continue to have professionals such as ourselves that hide in the closet and live in isolation fearful that their illness will become known.
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    Quote from ratgirl63
    We need to eliminate this unfair "witch hunt" of ones that have psychiatric illnesses. The medical field, of all places, should be a place of understanding and acceptance. Persons diagnosed with a psychiatric illness that is cared for with medications are no more a public threat than the person diagnosed with a physical illness. It makes me wonder if all the studies, statistics, and break-through care for the psychiatrically ill is even believed by the very ones that are in the field of this speciality. In our society a person that states he/she is mental ill is going to be an ostracized from the very ones that claim to want to support and help them. Until we accept persons with their unique mental issues we are going to continue to have professionals such as ourselves that hide in the closet and live in isolation fearful that their illness will become known.
    I see this is your first post here at Allnurses. THANK YOU for this great contribution to the discussion.

    On behalf of the Allnurses Staff and Guides, I welcome you to AN and hope that you'll become an active member. Your voice is important and your opinions are valued here. Enjoy!


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