Sitters/CNA's: Thank you for "doing nothing" - page 3

by CheesePotato 19,931 Views | 38 Comments

Two mornings ago I received a distraught phone call from my mother telling me that my dad, who is suffering with end stage COPD, spine compression fractures, and a distinct lack of proper narcotic metabolism, became flighty,... Read More


  1. 2
    I am currently a sitter while looking for my first RN job. I am so glad you acknowledge that what we do is not easy. I have met some awesome patients while being a sitter and I have learned so much.
    SleeepyRN and CheesePotato like this.
  2. 3
    You definitely have a way with words, and there is a lot of truth in your writing! Sitters are definitely under-appreciated for the most part, yet so necessary. I've also had the pleasure of hearing the families of patients express their gratitude for the sitter that was assigned to their loved one, though. It happens, just not enough!
  3. 2
    Your kind words and genuine well wishes are very much appreciated. I am thankful for each and every person that took the time to pause and read my ramblings.

    As for the gentleman in question, last I saw him, he was attempting finger painting with mayonnaise. But he was content, and that is all that matters.

    They have stopped his pain meds to see if he will come back around.

    I have yet to decide whether or not once he "sobers" I want to show him the video recorded conversation between he (him? Grammar Fairy to the courtesy desk, please.) and "some guy in a cardigan", AKA: the curtains.

    I'm pretty sure the fact that I recorded anything places me smack dab in a beach-side property on the lake of fire.

    I think I'm okay with that.

    Kindest regards,

    ~~CP~~
    Last edit by CheesePotato on Mar 21, '13
    Miss Lizzie and HappyRNBSN like this.
  4. 1
    "go big or go home"

    Reminds me of Julia Sugarbaker's oh-so-true quote about crazy people in the South: "I'm saying this is the South. And we're proud of our crazy people. We don't hide them up in the attic, we bring 'em right down to the living room and show them off. See, Phyllis, no one in the South ever asks if you have crazy people in your family, they just ask which side their on."

    I remember sitting with my grandfather when he was having oxygenation issues. Lord have mercy, we could have used a sitter. Especially after he bit my aunt.
    CheesePotato likes this.
  5. 5
    I used to be a sitter. I'll never forget the night that I was sitting for a suicidal young woman, and her family came in with their pastor. They asked if I would like to pray with them, and so I held hands with them and all of a sudden I was listening to the pastor say "And Lord, thank you for bringing sandyfeet here to keep (patient's name) safe, please bless her and give her the strength to stay awake all night...". I wish all sitters could hear things like that. They deserve it! It was such a difference from the treatment staff members gave me--waiting until 0330 to give me a lunch break, or making me beg for a bathroom break!
  6. 1
    Thank you so much for acknowledging sitters. I'm a night sitter with an elderly lady who lives in an assisted living facility. The CNA's at the facility often roll their eyes at me and talk about us in hushed tones to one another since we stay all night with her....until she starts to stir and get out of bed on her own, where to wander we'll never know! That's the moment I spring to action. They complain because I rest during the night, but it's like resting in the room with your own newborn baby, I leap to action with the tiniest stirring! It's a job where I'm responsible for her safety all night long. It is a big job and I often feel underappreciated by other members of the care team. Thank you!
    CheesePotato likes this.
  7. 2
    Thank you for the article.

    I am a night shift nurse aide, and as part of my job I have to be a sitter quite frequently. The job can be exhausting and very frustrating at times. To be honest, I don't usually look forward to these shifts. The worst is when you have staff that don't support you, such as when your RN seems irritated to come in and assist, if needed, in a situation. Luckily, the nursing staff is great most of the time. I have been hit, spit on, you name it.

    What gets me through these shifts is knowing that I can make a difference. I very much hate restraints, so I would prefer a confused patient have a sitter. On occasion, you get the patient who is so confused, agitated, restless, and combatitive that you don't feel like you've made a difference, since they required a restraint, despite the sitter, to keep you and themselves safe. I especially hate these nights because I feel like I have failed in some way.

    Thank you again for the appreciation.
  8. 1
    As an new RN who worked many times as a CNA/Sitter for the past two years with the oftentimes difficult patients I sat with, I would like to say how much I appreciate this post. I'm proud to say I always took excellent care of the patients under my watch but it wasn't - like you said - as easy as some might think. I really appreciate your wonderful post and I hope other RNs take it to heart
    CheesePotato likes this.
  9. 2
    I work in pediatrics and I appreciate our sitters! They keep our little patients safe from disconnecting their vent circuits, pulling out their lines and banging their heads on the bars of the cribs. They enable our little ones to be safe without being sedated or restrained with "no-no's." They become companions who can play with them, hold them, and keep them company when they feel sad that parents are unable to stay with them all the time. They also make my job as an RN so much easier!!

    My only wish is that we did not have to sometimes sacrifice our CNA's to sitting duty when we desperately need their skilled hands for our whole unit. I wish we had trained sitters to free up the CNA's. It's a tough night when we find out we are without CNA's because someone (or two or three) needs a sitter.
    CheesePotato and Paws2people like this.
  10. 1
    Posted this on another thread, but oh, how relevant is this to the wonderful work sitters do, and the kind of things they prevent. This man SHOULD have had a sitter.

    HospitalInspections.org | Report Detail
    CheesePotato likes this.


Top