TPAPN and terrified!

  1. Hello All,
    I have been an RN since 2011. Last April I was prescribed Klonopin for severe anxiety. I made a bad decision and took an extra pill at work on my shift. It was too strong and I almost passed out and had to go to er. I was fired and reported to bon. I also reported myself. I am now about to begin TPAPN and I am terrified. It is expensive and I am afraid I will miss something or not send something in on time. Mostly I am concerned about finding a job while on this. What do I say at the interview? Do I tell them that I am on TPAPN at the interview? Who the heck will hire me hearing that? I am terrified my nursing career is over. Please give some feedback. I appreciate everyone.
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  2. Visit mom35 profile page

    About mom35

    Joined: Feb '08; Posts: 500; Likes: 176
    Student at El Centro Started Jan 08 I have 36 credits, I took 5 classes during the summer and earned all A's! Applying for RN now and will have results in April; from US

    29 Comments

  3. by   mimifromtx
    Bless your poor heart! I would not wish this on my worst enemy! BUT..with that being said, TPAPN is certainly do-able! PLEASE....take a deep breath, focus, and just try to get from day to day (that is what helped me, and continues to help me!). The tests are pretty pricey, and being without an income for however many months until you are allowed to return to nursing (then going thru the whole interview process having to disclose TPAPN participation) can definitely be daunting. But there are many of us out here who have been in your shoes, and can attest to the fact that one day at a time we have made progress. Although I lurked on this message board for months, I found a lot of great advice and strength from these folks in a similar situation. For me in particular, disclosing TPAPN was super difficult. But I finally decided during my interview process to disclose early and often, with the actual person I was interviewing with. I worked dialysis for 4 months before finally finding a job in my niche that was willing to take a chance with me, and it did pay off. I was tired of getting thru several layers of interviews to never get a call back, so that's when I started disclosing my participation in a peer assistance program. When I worded it that way it ended up being not really a big deal (however when I tried to disclose TPAPN participation I never got a call back). And acting confident and being very straightforward about recovery is super helpful during the interview as well. Good luck!
  4. by   sallyrnrrt
    Just do it one day at a time, follows rules, fly under radar,

    This too will pass

    Best wishes
  5. by   Recovering_RN
    There's a lot of details to remember at first but believe it or not it becomes second nature after awhile. Use alerts and scheduled events on your phone's calendar to remind you of things. You've got daily check ins by phone (EVERY DAY, set an alert!!!), and monthly status reports to submit online, and quarterly status reports with your manager once you start working. That's not really all that bad once you get used to it.

    You may have to do some IOP first (intensive outpatient therapy) or god forbid inpatient treatment. Usually TPAPN requires you get an evaluation by a doctor trained in addiction, so he's the one who will recommend either IOP or inpatient. Next, TPAPN will tell you when you are allowed to go look for a job. Mine was when my counselor in IOP was willing to sign the form that I was ready to return to work. About 4 weeks into my IOP. Then the interviews. Lots of people wait until they are in the interview and it's looking good for them before they mention TPAPN. I tried that and was denied over and over. I got tired of going on interviews that were gonna be a waste of time so I started mentioning it upfront on the phone. Honestly that'll shut down most requests for interviews so there's the risk that you might be missing out on a chance for a job where if you could just get your foot in the door and show them what a great employee you'd be, you'd get that job. BUT I tried that, and it's not that they doubted me, I don't think (or not totally), it's just that they don't understand TPAPN and they think it'll be this huge hassle, or their legal department won't allow them to hire us, so you just can't convince them otherwise. So I figured I'd skip all those interviews and I told people on the phone when they were scheduling the interview. That worked out for me. But again, that'll keep you from interviewing with a LOT of employers who might just maybe like you so much in person that they're willing to give you a chance, if you hold off on telling them about TPAPN until you've actually sat with them in person and sold yourself well in the interview. You'll have to decide on your own which way to play that. But you HAVE TO tell them before you accept the job, because they have to call your TPAPN case manager, and your case manager has to be told about the job offer ahead of time. They don't want to get a call out of the blue from an employer wanting to hire you. The case managers have the option to refuse any job you are going after if they think it's unsuitable.

    One step at a time. You can do this!
  6. by   whitmil
    I'd love to help you if you need!
  7. by   mom35
    Thank you so much. Your words help me.
  8. by   mom35
    Thanks so much.
  9. by   mom35
    I need all the help I can get especially finding a job. I was working in psych but that hospital closed on Feb 16. Now I am starting tpapn and my eval has been done and my case worker will be getting back to me with details. On my last visit to my psychiatrist, just last Tuesday, she told me it would be nearly impossible to find a job on tpapn. I panicked when she told me that. My thought was "I will never work as a nurse again". It made me literally ill.
  10. by   catsmeow1972
    Quote from mom35
    I need all the help I can get especially finding a job. I was working in psych but that hospital closed on Feb 16. Now I am starting tpapn and my eval has been done and my case worker will be getting back to me with details. On my last visit to my psychiatrist, just last Tuesday, she told me it would be nearly impossible to find a job on tpapn. I panicked when she told me that. My thought was "I will never work as a nurse again". It made me literally ill.
    I'm going out on a limb here, but I though your psychiatrist was there to help you find ways to deal with your anxiety. If you have a history of needing klonopin and are now in TPAPN they should ought be helping with alternative ways to do this. Not induce more anxiety by telling you crap like that.
    Cheez. Yes, it can be difficult and downright frustrating finding a job but not impossible. You got psych experience? That's one of the best starting points for contract folks, even with no experience.
    You will find a job. At least at the get go, it may not be your dream job (or it could be, it has happened) but you will find one. In my opinion, if you can, I'd consider a different psych doc. To say something like that. Just wrong.
  11. by   mom35
    I thought my doctor's comment was rude. It literally felt like someone was twisting my gut. My case worker said I can find a position. The support here has lifted my spirits greatly. The anxiety I have had starting this program plus with my hospital closing and not working and some other changes in my life, I have spent the past month in a perpetual state of feeling defeated, anxious, depressed, helpless and hopeless. I am glad and grateful to everyone here. I feel alive again. I feel like fighting the good fight. It is a relief.
  12. by   Recovering_RN
    Yes you'll find a job. It may take 20-30 interviews, or more! But it will happen. Try to apply for psych jobs since you have the experience. That way when this is all said and done, and you're looking for a job a few years from now, you won't have to answer those awkward questions about "hmmm, why did you leave psych and go to dialysis?" TPAPN will not show up in your history anywhere after you're out, so your only issue will be explaining your resume. Not that I would suggest declining a dialysis job! You'll need to take whatever you can get, at first, especially because you'll have narc restrictions which will make certain jobs difficult to get. But with psych experience, that would be ideal.
  13. by   whitmil
    Hey! Can you email me directly at wmildren@gmail.com? It won't let me send private messages...
  14. by   mom35
    Also, what about cigarettes? Are they to be avoided?

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