Messed up bad..... - page 3

So I've only had my nursing license since 2011, and I love what I do. Unfortunately, I messed up really bad and now I'm worried about what's next. I tested positive for meth about a week ago. My... Read More

  1. by   Here.I.Stand
    Quote from OHRN2011
    I can't tell you how much that helps me. I do have to say knowing the records are sealed takes some weight off my chest. I'll go inactive. One thing I haven't mentioned because it's the worst part. I have a son that just turned 2 that I let down. I do take solace in that he's too young o understand and won't remember all this. Rehab scares me a lot because it seems the concensus is that my horrible drug of choice will likely land my inpatient. One person said they were in from Oct-Feb. Do they let toddlers visit?? It'll kill me to be away from him that long...do they let you go home for a bit during rehab to see your family??
    ((((Hugs))))
  2. by   PixieRN1
    Quote from OHRN2011
    I can't tell you how much that helps me. I do have to say knowing the records are sealed takes some weight off my chest. I'll go inactive. One thing I haven't mentioned because it's the worst part. I have a son that just turned 2 that I let down. I do take solace in that he's too young o understand and won't remember all this. Rehab scares me a lot because it seems the concensus is that my horrible drug of choice will likely land my inpatient. One person said they were in from Oct-Feb. Do they let toddlers visit?? It'll kill me to be away from him that long...do they let you go home for a bit during rehab to see your family??
    Be very careful about going inactive! In VA, you have to have an ACTIVE nursing license to be eligible for the recovery program!! Please, please check the requirements of your state’s program before you do that! You could be easily shooting yourself in the foot with that move. In VA, the only way to keep our licenses in situations as severe as yours and mine is to do these programs.

    If you are willing to do a recovery program, I would start the ball now and not wait for the BON to catch-up to you. You will have to do the time required by the program regardless, so there isn't a lot of point holding out if that is the option you would take if offered.

    I knew I was being reported. As soon as I got the contact info for my state's recovery program, I called. Things moved quickly for me and I had a signed monitoring contract in place just as the Board was starting their investigation. It was almost a year by the time I got the verdict regarding my discipline from the BON.

    Because I was in the program already and because of other mitigating factors, I was issued a stay of discipline; as long as I successfully complete my five year monitoring contract, there will never be discipline on my license for this event.

    Another reason to call is that these programs typically have lists of people that they approve to do your assessments, and another list of rehab/IOP facilities that they accept. It would suck to enter treatment and find out it's not approved.

    Yet another reason to start quickly is that you are more likely to get more out of your rehab now then you will maybe nine months later after the Board gets back with you and the cogs start churning. It's easier to swallow rehab when you have an active problem than it is when you have been clean for almost a year. At least I would think so.

    As for some of my personal experience, I made the choice not to lawyer up. I felt that my case was pretty darn cookie cutter for a very significant addiction and didn't see the point of trying to fight the accusations. Other people with lesser problems probably would benefit from a lawyer, but I knew I was in a massive pickle with no good way out; I was fairly pinned by the neck.

    All things considered, I received the best possible outcome someone in my situation could have had, with or without a lawyer. I got the elusive Golden Goose that is the stay of discipline.

    But again, I was dying in the hospital from sepsis and endocarditis thanks to my habit so pretty much anything else was a step up. I didn’t think a stay was going to be possible...I was expecting a suspension or revocation.

    Best wishes and keep us posted!
    Last edit by PixieRN1 on Oct 24
  3. by   berdeenbird
    As far as I know Ohio has no recovery program so to speak. They say they have an alternative program on their website but from the sounds of it no one gets in (my lawyer has not had anyone in years). Everything is handled by the bon and their 7-8 monitors who have over 100 nurse to manage. They took three years to get to me. I imagine if I would have not gone inactive they would have given me my sentence sooner.
  4. by   redopal
    You will probably have to go into diversion, loose your license either permanently or for a period of time depending on what your state decides. I had a good friend steal a whole box of injectable Demerol & got caught-he admitted he did it to get caught as he realized his problem, & lost his license for 5 years. He can only work where he does not come in contact with any narcotics! He works as a scrub nurse.
  5. by   PixieRN1
    Quote from berdeenbird
    As far as I know Ohio has no recovery program so to speak. They say they have an alternative program on their website but from the sounds of it no one gets in (my lawyer has not had anyone in years). Everything is handled by the bon and their 7-8 monitors who have over 100 nurse to manage. They took three years to get to me. I imagine if I would have not gone inactive they would have given me my sentence sooner.
    Egads! That is truly a shame.
  6. by   OHRN2011
    Holy cow....that's a lot to take in. It never occurred to me to do any of those measures. I can't begin to express to you all how amazing and helpful you e been to me! It also takes some of the sting away knowing I'm not alone in this. Knowing others can advise me with the best way to approach this is so amazing. I have a lot of work ahead of me but at least now I have a starting point. I love you guys!!!
  7. by   OHRN2011
    Quote from berdeenbird
    As far as I know Ohio has no recovery program so to speak. They say they have an alternative program on their website but from the sounds of it no one gets in (my lawyer has not had anyone in years). Everything is handled by the bon and their 7-8 monitors who have over 100 nurse to manage. They took three years to get to me. I imagine if I would have not gone inactive they would have given me my sentence sooner.
    Wait...what?? There aren't any approved facilities or it's just impossible to be accepted?? I'm sick to my stomach....
  8. by   PixieRN1
    Quote from OHRN2011
    Wait...what?? There aren't any approved facilities or it's just impossible to be accepted?? I'm sick to my stomach....
    OP, look at this link. It's a document of the actual statute and will help you I'm sure. It’s looks like the program does exist but does have a lengthy list of criteria one must meet to qualify. The timing looks quite important. I would start here...it’s at least worth a shot to looking into what you can do proactively.

    This isn’t legal advice...it just looks like it gives good info on the program.

    Lawriter - OAC

    Best wishes!!!!
    Last edit by PixieRN1 on Oct 24
  9. by   OHRN2011
    I'm desperate and will dig into whatever I have to. Thank you so much.
  10. by   PixieRN1
    Quote from OHRN2011
    I'm desperate and will dig into whatever I have to. Thank you so much.
    Anytime!
  11. by   SpankedInPittsburgh
    Good advice Pixie!!!
  12. by   berdeenbird
    No! I mean diversion or nurse programs that protect you anonymity and are separate from the board that monitor you during your 'agreement' Many states have these separate programs. In Ohio the board reviews your case, you are given a consent agreement, and you do the time.

    Rehab facilities are all over the place. Make sure your insurance is accepted there!
  13. by   OHRN2011
    Oh....I completely misunderstood. Thank you for clarifying.

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