You don't need RN experience to get an NP job - page 21

I'm a new grad Adult and Geri Primary Care NP. I do not have RN experience. Since I started seriously pounding the pavement in my job search, I have had numerous phone and in person interviews. ... Read More

  1. by   5150rn2
    Excuse me, that is just one example I chose to share. How many examples do I need to be considered valid and not anecdotal?
    While you sounded earnest and sincere when this thread started you now sound defensive, rude and arrogant. Obviously people may have been more kind and supportive if you hadn't kicked into ***** turbo mode.
    I have absolutely no problem with anyone regardless of title or degree or experience if they can deliver.. it's a team effort and no one likes picking up after someone who talks the talk but fails miserably at walking the walk.
    I really hope you bring a little less arrogance and a lot more compassion to the patients you treat. Because THEY are your success or failure and they do not care about your previous successes. They care are about here and now. So the sooner you realize you can't ride on your previous laurels and sit down and commit to amazing care for your patients the happier you will be.
    Last edit by traumaRUs on Jan 12
  2. by   WKShadowRN
    Quote from BostonFNP
    Rich, E. R. (2005). Does RN experience relate to NP clinical skills?. The Nurse Practitioner, 30(12), 53-56.

    Barnes, H. (2015). Exploring the factors that influence nurse practitioner role transition. The Journal for Nurse Practitioners, 11(2), 178-183.

    Pellico, L. H., Terrill, E., White, P., & Rico, J. (2012). Integrative review of graduate entry programs in nursing. Journal of Nursing Education, 51(1), 29-37.

    Hart, A. M., & Bowen, A. (2016). New nurse practitioners' perceptions of preparedness for and transition into practice. The Journal for Nurse Practitioners, 12(8), 545-552.

    Faraz, A. (2017). Novice nurse practitioner workforce transition and turnover intention in primary care. Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, 29(1), 26-34.

    Steiner, S. H., McLaughlin, D. G., Hyde, R. S., Brown, R. H., & Burman, M. E. (2008). Role transition during RN-to-FNP education. Journal of Nursing Education, 47(10), 441–447

    Rich, E. R., Jorden, M. E., & Taylor, C. J. (2001). Assessing successful entry into nurse practitioner practice: a literature review. The Journal of the New York State Nurses' Association, 32(2), 14-18.

    Pasarón, R. (2013). Nurse practitioner job satisfaction: looking for successful outcomes. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 22(17-18), 2593-2604.

    Brown, M. A., & Olshansky, E. F. (1997). From limbo to legitimacy: A theoretical model of the transition to the primary care nurse practitioner role. Nursing research, 46(1), 46-51.

    Cusson, R. M., & Strange, S. N. (2008). Neonatal nurse practitioner role transition: The process of reattaining expert status. Journal of Perinatal and Prenatal Nursing, 22(4), 329–337.

    Kelly, N. R., & Mathews, M. (2001). The transition to first position as nurse practitioner. Journal of Nursing Education, 40, 156–162.
    Thank you very much. You are helping my literature review. I had some of these already, actually.

    /curtsies
    /flounces away tripping over feather boa.
  3. by   chiromed0
    Wow. All I can say is "Wow". You are happy you don't need RN experience to be called an "Advanced Practice RN" like it's totally removed from being an RN. I'm happy you have a job offer. I'm disappointed this profession is failing patients by providing inexperienced practitioners to take care of the public. I could have gone straight into the APRN role also but I was tired of being a pseudo healthcare provider and there was NO WAY I wanted to be an APRN w/o real, boots on the floor and hands on the bedpan, real RN experience. I even delayed getting an NP job until I had more RN experience for almost a year. I can tell you that as a graduate APRN you do not have the background to fully understand "why" you are doing "what" you are doing. And time will tell you that without that exposure to other medical providers you will lack the basic science background to understand pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacology. NP's struggle with this and differential diagnosis to begin with compared to PA's and physicians, add to it no experience at all being a registered nurse makes the whole profession at risk. This is not good. It may be reality, but it's not good.
  4. by   BostonFNP
    Quote from chiromed0
    I could have gone straight into the APRN role also but I was tired of being a pseudo healthcare provider and there was NO WAY I wanted to be an APRN w/o real, boots on the floor and hands on the bedpan, real RN experience.
    And as someone wanting to get out of the pseudoscience bit, what did you base this important decision on?


    Quote from chiromed0
    I even delayed getting an NP job until I had more RN experience for almost a year. I can tell you that as a graduate APRN you do not have the background to fully understand "why" you are doing "what" you are doing. And time will tell you that without that exposure to other medical providers you will lack the basic science background to understand pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacology. NP's struggle with this and differential diagnosis to begin with compared to PA's and physicians, add to it no experience at all being a registered nurse makes the whole profession at risk. This is not good. It may be reality, but it's not good.
    Did "almost a year" of RN experience fill all these gaps in your knowledge base or did you work for longer than that just added a year to the end (was hard to tewll from post)? What did you think of your RN role? Did you develop expertise in that role? Could/did you do that while also going to school full time? How long was your orientation, how long did you work on your own prior to leaving? What was the most important thing the experience gave you in your new APRN role?

    Having worked with student NP students along side medical students and ddx is a struggle for all of them and I have never noticed a significant difference between SNP and M3 or M4s in this. Novice practicing NPs still struggle as do novice physicians even after residency. Actually, even experts still are developing their ddx skills while others are effectively losing their skills.
    Last edit by BostonFNP on Jan 10
  5. by   Skippingtowork
    Quote from Jules A
    What exactly is a "provider trainee role"? My jobs were paying me top dollar and expected me to be able to carry a full load from day one.
    Part of the training in NP school. Not referring to on-the-job training. I wasn't clear. Also, I've been around a lot ofd physicians, including those with lots of experience, but joining a new practice. Not once did I see them take a full load on day one. What is considered a full load for an NP. You have to learn the computers, there system of doing things, all the specialists to refer to, what tests/exams are completed in that office and the different insurance companies. Am I missing something?
  6. by   Skippingtowork
    Quote from djmatte

    I agree with ditching useless capstone projects. Where I think education needs to go is to utilize the MSN as a general nurse practitioner training while using the DNP as an area of focus. At the very least it can double the clinical hours, broaden knowledge of the different areas of advance practice, and allow a more educated decision when someone finally decides what kind of NP they want to be when they grow up.
    I think you will have a lot of support regarding the DNP capstone. I always thought it was to become clinical experts, but no so. I don't know who came up with the requirements and it probably will take another generation to change the requirements. Some projects are worthwhile in that the nurse becomes an expert in a process change: however, some projects fizzle out, but the student has to continue on or repeat course. I think a 2-year paid residency, with1 year in primary care (general hospitalist for acute care) and 1 year in whatever area of practice you want, would make a nice DNP program. Presentations and lectures could be part of the program, as well as a requirement to submit written work for publication.
  7. by   djmatte
    I look at it backwards from that. Use an MSN to get an overview of specialties with rotations in primary care, peds, ob, acute care, and mental heath. Then focus the dnp toward the specialty of choice where you become board certified.
  8. by   BlondieMSNRN
    Fullglass: Bcgradnurse wrote you a very nice, thoughtful reply to get you think about not coming across as so arrogant and to ostensibly stop this madness of a thread. You again attacked her.
    My advice to you as well is to tone down the defensive attitude. No one will care -- the docs, RNs, MAs, the front desk, LEAST of all those patients who need your help-- about your prior job that had nothing to do w nursing or that you're fat and over 40. Remember you're there to learn at your 1st NP job. For you, this will include learning how to not be so defensive. It will get you nowhere quickly. And as a word of caution, your support staff can make or break your day so it's best to not walk around with your nose in the air.
    Last edit by BlondieMSNRN on Jan 11 : Reason: Typo
  9. by   BlondieMSNRN
    Can we just close this down now? Who do we contact?
    Last edit by BlondieMSNRN on Jan 11
  10. by   MNGrad
    Which schools are apart of the "degree mills?" Please give some examples, so I can avoid them.
  11. by   BCgradnurse
    Quote from BlondieMSNRN
    Can we just close this down now? Who do we contact?
    Agreed. I don't think we're dealing with a well balanced individual here in regards to the OP. Plus, my popcorn is all gone.
  12. by   Irish_Mist
    Quote from FullGlass
    Overall, this thread has been quite enlightening. Here is what I have learned about most of the participants:

    1. You all gave a great demonstration of "nursing eats its young" in a manner akin to fraternity and sorority hazing. "I did x, so everyone should have to do x for all eternity."

    2. Many of you are very resistant to change

    3. Many of you are very insecure, as evidenced by your terror of having to compete for jobs if there is an NP surplus

    4. The collective hive mind here functions at a middle school level in terms of emotional IQ. Many of you seem to think your opinion of me matters. Ridiculous.

    5. It was fascinating to watch: as I refused to kowtow to you all, you started attacking me personally, yet when I defended myself, I became boastful, etc. Don't dish it out if you can't take it. Many of you all also resort to "double binding."

    6. Many of you like to tear down others to feel better about yourselves

    7. Some of you look down on clinicians that choose to practice in medically underserved and less desirable areas, assuming they must be subpar clinicians. Honestly, that is just plain disgusting and shameful. Talk about discrediting the nursing profession.

    8. You all need to take responsibility for your reactions. You choose to be offended or not. That is your own responsibility. But, responsibility can be very scary.

    9. Many of you seem to suffer from cognitive dissonance. Fact: I got multiple job good offers w/o RN experience. All your collective cluck-clucking and tsk tsking disapproval does not change that fact.

    10. Most of you do not have any sense of humor and cannot engage in any sort of debate w/o getting angry or having hurt feelings. Have you all ever watched political debates? A great example of this is the British Commons Question Time, with a lot of insults hurled back and forth, but of course, those are adults who can engage in a spirited debate. I confess, at first this thread made me feel a bit frustrated, but I quickly got over it. Just so you know, I was laughing most of the time when responding, being as obnoxious as possible, because it was so easy to push buttons here that I couldn't resist the temptation. The only time I really got angry was the insinuation that anyone who chooses to practice in a remote rural area must be subpar.

    Now, I am going to decide which of my 9 excellent job offers to accept. I decided to cancel an interview for a great cardiology NP position this week, because 9 offers is enough. I'll make a decision by the end of the week.
    This entire thread is inflammatory and condescending. You came her for an argument and you got one. I sincerely hope you are very supervised in your practice because if your behavior on here is any evidence in how you conduct yourself professionally and personally, all I can say is wow.

    Also, who are you to say anything about nurses eating their young? You've never worked as a nurse so your point is moot.
  13. by   traumaRUs
    Well, you guys asked for it and yep, the thread is getting closed down.

    This is a hot topic among APRNs (direct entry) and it almost always dissolves into an us-against-them mentality.

    IMHO it should be us-against-the-system that doesn't allow us to practice to the full extent of our license.

    Anyway everyone have a nice Friday!

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