PMHNP programs all going from MSN to DNP? - page 2

by shannarini71

7,194 Views | 21 Comments

Hi, FIU's PMHNP program recently came off moratorium for their PMHNP program--however, they apparently are changing from a master's degree program in 2013 to a BSN-DNP program in 2014! Is this the "norm" for other PMHNP... Read More


  1. 2
    Quote from harmonizer
    It will make a different in salary. Graduates with higher debt load will demand higher salary, hence higher salary for all.
    The amount of debt load for students of all professions has increased exponentially since the 80s, yet real wages have remained the same. There is no correlation between debt load and salary.
    shannarini71 and FuturePsychNP like this.
  2. 4
    I'm all for the DNP. I'm a nerd and love school. Here's the BUT... I dont believe in a doctorate program just for the sake of a doctorate. If I'm investing money, time and energy there better be a return. It seems like the schools just found a way to make more money off the nursing world.
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    I think this absolutely nuts. I looked at what a PAs education and salary is . I wonder why they can have still only a masters degree and a nurse has to get to back to get a DNP, but the same or nearly the same pay. I am all for education and professionalism , but I find this outrageous and so should any fellow nurse.
    priorities2 and shannarini71 like this.
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    I think the DNP as entry to practice is absurd.
    priorities2 and SycamoreGuy like this.
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    Why will an DNP be inherently more expensive and harder to attain? I'm honestly wondering. Don't master's and doctoral classes usually cost about the same per credit hour, on average* (with some variation from school to school)? I thought programs were generally just converting their pre-existing MSN programs to DNP programs. Same education, different degree.

    Also, I can't speak specifically for these nursing degrees, but isn't it generally a lot easier to get financial aid for a doctorate than a master's?

    If all the above is true, I personally would be all for it. The NP curriculum already resembles a doctorate program more than a typical master's program. So it's just giving NP's the more appropriate title, with a more accurate recognition of their level of expertise.


    *random examples of MSN vs. DNP cost per credit hour from a google search, except jefferson which I specifically searched for: jefferson (same), university of colorado (same), cleveland state university (same), duke (were same, now DNP is more), vanderbilt (where the DNP is weirdly way cheaper than the MSN), frontier (dnp is cheaper), MUSC (same)...
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    Oh, and I don't think anyone is proposing that NP's with MSN's would have to go back to school for a DNP.
  7. 0
    Quote from SycamoreGuy
    All the schools in my area are still offering the MSN for all NP specialties. They have the DNP as a post-masters option but I haven't seen any BSN-DNP programs yet.
    Now that is a huge ripoff.
  8. 0
    Quote from Elinor
    Oh, and I don't think anyone is proposing that NP's with MSN's would have to go back to school for a DNP.
    That's not the point of the argument. No. Nobody proposing that all MSN have to go back to school. They are already NPs. I am sure most of them don't want to. Nothing they can do with that. I am talking about the DNP being the new entry level for NP. I support for the elimination of BSN-MSN and the change to BSN-DNP. It may not become law but I hope more and more schools will follow this route. I am sure that the online diploma mills will be the last to follow because they wants student to enroll.

    Just like they do not force BS Pharm/MS Pharm to get PharmD. Master DPT does not have to go back for DPT either.
    Last edit by harmonizer on May 16, '13
  9. 0
    Quote from harmonizer
    Nobody proposing that all MSN have to go back to school. They are already NPs.
    harmonizer, l150 just did. That was in response to her post, to clarify.
  10. 0
    Quote from Elinor
    Why will an DNP be inherently more expensive and harder to attain? I'm honestly wondering. Don't master's and doctoral classes usually cost about the same per credit hour, on average* (with some variation from school to school)? I thought programs were generally just converting their pre-existing MSN programs to DNP programs. Same education, different degree.

    Also, I can't speak specifically for these nursing degrees, but isn't it generally a lot easier to get financial aid for a doctorate than a master's?

    If all the above is true, I personally would be all for it. The NP curriculum already resembles a doctorate program more than a typical master's program. So it's just giving NP's the more appropriate title, with a more accurate recognition of their level of expertise.


    *random examples of MSN vs. DNP cost per credit hour from a google search, except jefferson which I specifically searched for: jefferson (same), university of colorado (same), cleveland state university (same), duke (were same, now DNP is more), vanderbilt (where the DNP is weirdly way cheaper than the MSN), frontier (dnp is cheaper), MUSC (same)...
    Perhaps you're forgetting that a DNP, as a doctorate, will require more credit hours than an MSN, which is a masters. In the end, of course it'll be more expensive...

    As for financial aid, it's quite easy to get grad plus loans for any graduate program, masters or doctorate. The degree does not make a difference.


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