NP's are okay to see if you have a cold, BUT... - page 3

I want to become a nurse practitioner. At least, I'm pretty sure I do. I can't say with 100% certainty but it is definitely something I am interested in. I think I would like having my own clinic... Read More

  1. by   traumaRUs
    My patients like me - because I'm available to them and will talk on "their level." I work with a mostly minority, poverty-entrenched population and they like that they can come to me for just about anything and I won't put them off.

    APN's are the wave of the future in medicine.
  2. by   Multicollinearity
    In fairness to the OP, Motorcycle Mama, maybe she just hasn't had exposure to many APN's in her geographic area. Maybe I'm so pro-APN because in my area it is mainstream for them to be autonomous. In my area a few have their own practices. No physician collaberation required.

    I'll admit that when I went back to school, I was clueless about CRNA's. Better to ask and learn about these things.
  3. by   ERNP
    Quote from gauge14iv
    one thing I do NOT like about the ad campaigns for the minute clinics and redi clinics - is that they give the public the idea that the only things an NP is qualified to diagnose and treat is sore throats and sunburn. I dont think the retail clinics are doing NP's any favors at all in that regard.

    Drives me nuts.
    Drives me nuts too!!
  4. by   platon20
    Quote from prmenrs
    IOften the NNPs were in charge of doc "work" rounds in the convalescing area of the nursery instead of one of the attendings.

    What does this mean? ARe you saying the NNPs told the doctors the plan for the patient and the docs just followed their orders? If thats the case, why were the doctors even taking care of teh babies at all?

    I dont understand why you need docs in a NICU when the NNPs were apparently doing everything.
  5. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from motorcycle mama
    I assume, even though an NP can be a PCP, that an NP mostly treats colds, minor infections, gives physicals to truckers...but a NP certainly is not a doctor (even though the name on prescription bottles usually reads "Dr. so and so".)
    I know a nurse practitioner who operates a cash-based women's health practice. She does a lot more than perform physicals and treat colds and infections.

    This particular nurse practitioner charges $40 per visit and earns a lot of money since she does not have to deal with insurance companies. She has a cash-only practice.

    Additionally, the last time I had a prescription written by an NP, the prescription bottle read "J******* E*******, CNP".
  6. by   CrazyPremed
    Quote from gauge14iv
    And another PA or NP might have said the same thing the MD did - depends on the person, their background, experience and exposure. Not the credentials. Give me a tenth year NP over a first year MD any day.
    Alright, folks.

    I'm all for NP's, but let's not get ahead of ourselves here. The training of an NP - while VERY respectable and intense - does not compare to the training of a medical doctor. I am NOT flaming NP's here, just giving respect where it is due. I work with MD's, DO's, NP's, and PA's every day. There are many similarities between the two. But the knowledge base doesn't even come close.

    CrazyPremed
  7. by   zenman
    Quote from CrazyPremed
    Alright, folks.

    I'm all for NP's, but let's not get ahead of ourselves here. The training of an NP - while VERY respectable and intense - does not compare to the training of a medical doctor. I am NOT flaming NP's here, just giving respect where it is due. I work with MD's, DO's, NP's, and PA's every day. There are many similarities between the two. But the knowledge base doesn't even come close.

    CrazyPremed
    A few weeks ago, I was working a basketball game and the ref was telling me about visiting three specialists for his foot pain. He also told a nurse who said, "why don't you change your shoes?" He did, and the pain went away.

    I'm sure everyone gets the point.
  8. by   gauge14iv
    And it isn't all about the training - you can train someone to the nth degree - but if they have no common sense...
  9. by   MS, APRN, BC, FNP
    Quote from CrazyPremed
    Alright, folks.

    I'm all for NP's, but let's not get ahead of ourselves here. The training of an NP - while VERY respectable and intense - does not compare to the training of a medical doctor. I am NOT flaming NP's here, just giving respect where it is due. I work with MD's, DO's, NP's, and PA's every day. There are many similarities between the two. But the knowledge base doesn't even come close.

    CrazyPremed
    When a NP graduates from school, he/she should not be practicing independently. When a doc graduates from their pre med program, they of course should not be practicing independently. Both providers go through a kind of residency where they see patients until they're competent enough to be independent. For a NP that is more vague, but they do an equivalent residency. The NP gets their residency through their work experience.

    I'm not sure what your saying about the knowledge base. I see some docs that don't seem to have a knowledge base from some of the things I've seen from their standard of practice. Again, it comes down to the competence of the individual not the credentials after their name. When it comes to the specialties, I'll give the docs their due (I know some great ones), but in general practice ask around who the best primary care provider is and you'll find just as many patients that prefer the NP over the MD as those who like their MD. I've had many patients leave their MD and come to me on a regular basis. Now, why is that? Even docs don't respect each other based on that MD after their name. Respect the person not the credentials. I'll take my reputation over some of the jokers that just happen to have an MD after their name in primary care any day. Having an MD after your name isn't like buying meat that has the USDA label on it. You can't always trust it by a long shot. Actually, you can't always trust the USDA label either. It would be nice if we could determine the quality of the healthcare we're getting just by looking at the credentials after the name but it's just not possible from my experience. It's better just to look at the providers name and then ask around.

    You sound like idealistic premed student. Don't worry, you'll learn.
    Last edit by MS, APRN, BC, FNP on Nov 29, '06
  10. by   scribblerpnp
    Quote from EricEnfermero
    When I worked for a pediatric clinic, the NP would sometimes consult one of the physicians if she wasn't comfortable with a particular assessment finding. The docs would also consult her frequently, especially in regard to her area of special interest (child abuse/sexual assault issues).

    This is SO true! I am blessed to work with a great pediatrician who is wonderful with team work. We both realize each others strengths and weaker areas and will consult one another or send our pts to follow-up with one another. We both love peds, but have our separate interests. Never once do I feel like I am an NP who justs takes care of runny noses. I take care of chronically ill children, order and interpret very important lab and diagnostic testing. I also took hospital call at another job as an NP where I admitted and D/C'd pts from the hospital. Often times, the pt would only see the MD one time (no later than 24 hours from admission, per hospital policy) and I would manage the care up to and following D/C. Sometimes I would consult the MD, sometimes not. It just depended on what was wrong and my level of knowledge and comfort in that area.

    I think it would be a great idea to shadow an NP. You may be surprised!
  11. by   scribblerpnp
    Quote from motorcycle mama
    That seems unbelievable. Did that doctor get his medical degree out of a cereal box?
    Any doctor who is not able to recognize chicken pox should be reported to the medical board.

    You would be surprised at the number of medical professionals who have never seen chicken pox. It doesn't always present as text book, and the rates have decreased since the vaccine came out. Most of the professionals I know who haven't seen it are younger. It doesn't mean they are stupid, it is just a result of a decrease of occurance. I doubt I would be able to recognize mumps right away. It just isn't common any more!
  12. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from ERNP
    I was talking about nurses and nursing faculty too. I won't move on to the general populace until we can come up with a semblance of a collective thought.

    Besides, my interactions with the public would leave me to think many of them have a higher opinion of NPs than the OP
    Of course the general public has a high opinion of NPs. The general public believes nurses (or just about anyone who works in the healthcare field) know EVERYTHING.
    And there are no doubt nurses who like to take advantage of and perpetuate this myth.

    Someone asked why a person would go see anyone for a cold...I don't know, why do they? I took the title of this post directly from a patient I talked to who was telling me about a doctor he had been seeing. He said, "Doctor Brown is okay to see if you have a cold...but if you've got anything seriously wrong with you go see someone else."

    It seems some NPs and ANPs carry around a chip on their shoulders and look down on anyone who doesn't feel their advanced education and credentials put them on the same level as an MD (or higher). Of course, there is something to be said for experience, and of course, you will have "quacks" in all areas of medicine and I'm sure there are situations depending on the doctor where it would be a lot better to see a NP, but a NP is not an MD nor should they be advertised as being "as good or better." Don't tell me no one is suggesting that because I see it all through many posts on this forum. NP's still practice nursing, not medicine. And if they were on the level of MDs they would not work under them. No, it doesn't make APN any less worthy of a profession. I also don't think because someone dares to suggest that a doctor is better to see for some things than a NP they should be ridiculed and accused of disrespecting what NPs do, because that most certainly isn't the case, and if someone can't see that they are carrying around a pretty big chip.
    Last edit by Jo Dirt on Nov 29, '06
  13. by   BSNtobe2009
    Quote from traumaRUs
    My patients like me - because I'm available to them and will talk on "their level." I work with a mostly minority, poverty-entrenched population and they like that they can come to me for just about anything and I won't put them off.

    APN's are the wave of the future in medicine.
    I don't necessarily agree that they are the wave of the future. Granted, NP's are going to become more common as the population grows and the medical schools can't crank out enough medical doctors, and some experienced nurses are seeking to advance their careers. I feel that the Minute Clinics and Urgent Care Centers in no way henders the "prestigue" of the NP profession. They are not true emergency rooms...there is no way I would go to one of those things if I was having a heart attack or anything else hugely serious, because all the do is call 911 anyway and have you transported to the hospital, so in THAT case, yeah, it's ok to associate the centers with colds and stuff because they shouldn't be treating anything that should be sent on to the hospital. It's about not having to wait 5 hours while you sit through every car accident, chest pain, and drug overdose emergency....and I really don't care who is behind the curtain just as long as they can give me a prescription and let me fly out the door.

    The same thing happens with doctors, physicians in cosmetic surgery are constantly trying to educate the public about the difference between a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon and a Cosmetic Surgeon. The statistics clearly show that the vast majority of the horror stories are happening when someone goes to a Cosmetic Surgeon...it's because the experience level just isn't there and the education just isn't there...do you hear the Cosmetic Surgeons sit up and start screaming, "Oh, the Board Certified guys are just bullying the public into thinking the Cosmetic Surgeons are not just as qualified to do surgery. Didn't we both attend medical school? Didn't we both do a residency? " The truth is, BCPS's training is for 7 years.

    Now, if you were in a major car accident, and were horribly disfigured, who would you want? The Cosmetic Surgeon or the Board Certified Guy?

    I just feel that every level of nursing and medical is honorable. Everyone works HARD for their degrees! They SHOULD be recognized for their hard work, and get every leve of respect the deserve. I just don't believe in fluffing it.

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