Do I really need a DEA?

  1. I just got a job as a NP at a hair restoration clinic doing injection procedures. There is no controlled substances administered or prescribed. The employer is not willing to pay for the DEA, and I'm wondering if I really need it? I don't want to pay $700+ out of pocket for something that I will not use.
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    Hmm...I wouldn't see why you would need to get it then
  4. by   TammyG
    You can always get it later, even if you are unemployed. I am surprised your employer will not pay -- you'd think that they would want you at least to be able to subscribe pain killers or anti-inflammatories or something. Maybe it is a malpractice issue.
  5. by   APRN1990
    I would honestly say no.
  6. by   Melody48_MSNEd
    I did not get it as we don't prescribe sched meds in the office. If I write an order on a pt I am rounding on at the hospital, I still don't need the DEA as I am covered under my MD collaborator. (Fl law). BTW I work in GI
  7. by   cayenne06
    You can write without a DEA, assuming of course you've met all the other state requirements, which can vary. If you aren't writing scripts and they won't pay, no need to get it right away. But as a matter of professional pride (bad reason lol) I would still get it at some point. It can take a while to process the paperwork in some states, so it's also nice to have in case you look for other work.

    Melody, you probably know better than me about Florida law, but I am pretty sure that writing for controlled substances under another person's DEA is frowned upon, because that goes against the whole point of tracking prescribers. My understanding is that you should always write any controlled med under your own number, even if you are required to have a physician sign off on your care. Not sure if you were talking controlled meds, or just orders/scripts in general, so sorry if this is not applicable.
  8. by   Melody48_MSNEd
    Quote from cayenne06
    You can write without a DEA, assuming of course you've met all the other state requirements, which can vary. If you aren't writing scripts and they won't pay, no need to get it right away. But as a matter of professional pride (bad reason lol) I would still get it at some point. It can take a while to process the paperwork in some states, so it's also nice to have in case you look for other work.

    Melody, you probably know better than me about Florida law, but I am pretty sure that writing for controlled substances under another person's DEA is frowned upon, because that goes against the whole point of tracking prescribers. My understanding is that you should always write any controlled med under your own number, even if you are required to have a physician sign off on your care. Not sure if you were talking controlled meds, or just orders/scripts in general, so sorry if this is not applicable.
    Here is a clarification of the bill that allows me to write any med including sched meds in the hospital:

    HB 1241 was passed during the 2016 Legislative Session and provides authority for an advanced registered nurse practitioner (ARNP) to order any medication for administration to a patient in a hospital, ambulatory surgical center, nursing home, or mobile surgical facility within the framework of an established protocol. Physician assistants (PA) may also order any medication for administration to the supervising physician’s patient in a nursing home with their supervising physician’s delegation.

    A supervising physician may authorize a PA and ARNP to order controlled substances for administration to a patient in a hospital, ambulatory surgical center, nursing home, or mobile surgical facility.

    In addition, the bill expands the Florida’s Emergency Treatment and Recover Act, which allows pharmacists to dispense emergency opioid antagonists to individuals based upon a non-patient-specific standing order issued for auto injection delivery systems or intranasal application delivery systems if they are appropriately labeled with instructions for use.

    These provisions will become effective July 1, 2016.
  9. by   nursetim
    Quote from cayenne06
    You can write without a DEA, assuming of course you've met all the other state requirements, which can vary. If you aren't writing scripts and they won't pay, no need to get it right away. But as a matter of professional pride (bad reason lol) I would still get it at some point. It can take a while to process the paperwork in some states, so it's also nice to have in case you look for other work.

    Melody, you probably know better than me about Florida law, but I am pretty sure that writing for controlled substances under another person's DEA is frowned upon, because that goes against the whole point of tracking prescribers. My understanding is that you should always write any controlled med under your own number, even if you are required to have a physician sign off on your care. Not sure if you were talking controlled meds, or just orders/scripts in general, so sorry if this is not applicable.
    I worked a contract as a locums at a hospital that did not require a dea. I prescribed under the hospital's dea #.
  10. by   aprnKate
    No its not necessary to have a DEA if you don't want to be marketable for other job opportunities

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