sooo tired of staff without ANY compassion or empathy!!! - page 3

by nervousnurse 7,869 Views | 30 Comments

Ugh, I need to vent!!! I've been a nurse for several years and I get tired and stressed out like everyone else. No, I'm not always thinking the nicest things, but I am ALWAYS kind to patients, no matter what! I always keep... Read More


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    My husband was a patient in a large university hospital's MICU waiting for a liver. For the most part, the nurses were merely OK or totally apathetic Very, very few nurses paid attention to the alarms or whether their patient was off the monitor. Spent even less interacting with them. I came in one night and found my husband sitting at the edge of the bed exhausted and short of breath. He told me the nurse had unhooked him and taken him to the bathroom and he had to make it back to bed on his own. He had been up at the bedside almost an hour before I got there, I put him back to bed and reattached his monitor. (I got quite proficient with their monitoring equipment) His nurse is lucky he didn't fall. Apparently, she didn't remind him to pull the call light (mental status was a little shaky at times) and she never came back to check on him. The alarm had gone off the whole time. What was she doing? At the nurses station with 3 of her cohorts sharing things on their cell phones. I stood at the door looking out toward the group and finally after 15 minutes someone acknowledged me. I asked who his nurse was and she came over and got an attitude with me after I explained what had just happened. Whatever. Before anyone says anything about MICU nursing....don't go there...I am a ICU nurse myself so I know how it goes sometimes when things are crazy. Things were quiet that night.
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    Great, another "let's rant about every bad nurse we've ever met" thread where we all get to feel superior because we're so much more caring.

    Quote from applewhitern
    We have a problem with cell phone usage at my facility. They won't ban them, because they say a child might need to call, or some other emergency. Staff is on their phones constantly. It is unprofessional, and rude. There is no excuse for anyone having to wait one hour for a dilaudid refill. I would be knocking some heads over that.
    How exactly does a nurse being on their cell phone make the pharmacy deliver the dilaudid any slower? Because everywhere that I've worked, it wasn't nursing that was the delay in a PCA refill, it was pharmacy. Of course the nurses always make a perfect target for any frustration with the delay.

    Quote from blueheaven
    He had been up at the bedside almost an hour before I got there ... (mental status was a little shaky at times) ... I stood at the door looking out toward the group and finally after 15 minutes someone acknowledged me. ....
    Exactly 15 minutes? Not 14? Or 16? Although I'm sure your perception of time was better than the man with "shaky" mental status, who couldn't remember to call for assistance but knew the exact amount of time he'd been sitting on the side of the bed. I'm sure in your time as an ICU nurse you've NEVER had someone perceive their wait for you to be longer than it actually was.
    Teacup Pom, KelRN215, Rose_Queen, and 2 others like this.
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    No feeling superior here; but wooh, honestly, I have seen a lot less compassion among nurses in the last 10 years or so----at least it seems that way. Nothing scientific or verifiable to the point of being generalizable to the greater nursing population at large. You just have to wonder sometimes is all. It's sad, and, well, depressing. I've also witnessed it as loved ones were patients in hospitals. I don't know what's happening with human empathy in this field, but seriously, it troubles me.
    blueheaven likes this.
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    This can be a hard situation to take in. Did you try talking about this to your supervisor on how this issue can be addressed?
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    Quote from JBMmommy
    I'm new in my LTC facility, I've got 30 residents, two med passes and a treatment pass in the course of my 8-hour shift. I absolutely agree with you about certain aspects, however, I've already found it's not always that easy. I have a resident that needed a PRN Tylenol the other day and it took me 20 minutes to administer it because she wanted- her pillow fixed, her feet moved, a drink of water, some milkshake, etc. I did my best to spend time, but 20 minutes for one med is more than I can spend. I eventually had to say "Ms. ___ I understand that you were feeling pain and now you'd like to have some company, I have some other residents that are also waiting for their medicines and when I can I'll be back in to take care of anything else you need." She proceeded to ring non-stop for the next 90 minutes. If anyone other than myself or one aide went in she would yell at them to go away, and then ring the bell as soon as they walked out the door. I spent at least another 20 minutes over the course of the shift- which went an hour over my scheduled time. I did take five minutes to call my family and say goodnight, never ate anything or even stopped to pee. Sometimes we can't make people happy because as much as we want to stop and do whatever it takes, there were 29 other people that also deserved my care and attention. I think the whole staffing system in LTC is horrendous and it breaks my heart that I can't provide half of the "caring" I'd like.

    I really wish we had a solution to this. Its depressing. Downright, want to hide under my covers for days, depressing. I feel so hopeless about this. We were all taught in nursing school to say exactly what you did to needy patients. But so many times, it does not work. I've really been feeling hopeless about nursing lately. I'm in the process of looking for a job, but I'm so scared it will be a horrible place with too many patients to REALLY care for.
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    Quote from wooh
    Great, another "let's rant about every bad nurse we've ever met" thread where we all get to feel superior because we're so much more caring.
    Thank goodness. I thought I was the only one thinking this.
    Teacup Pom and wooh like this.
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    This is a topic near and dear to my heart. I have been a nurse for 30 years and I treat every patient as though they are my loved one. I hold patients hands when they are scared and lonely. I sit at the bedside to just talk and listen. Many nurses today especially where I work are so detached that they don't even see their patient. They are bodies.it breaks my heart to see patients treated poorly. They can never understand why patients end up yelling ......well maybe if you would just acknowledge them they wouldn't need to act that way. I also teach my students the human factor if nursing. You can teach skills you can't teach caring and compassion.
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    [QUOTE=wooh;7247612]Great, another "let's rant about every bad nurse we've ever met" thread where we all get to feel superior because we're so much more caring.


    How exactly does a nurse being on their cell phone make the pharmacy deliver the dilaudid any slower? Because everywhere that I've worked, it wasn't nursing that was the delay in a PCA refill, it was pharmacy. Of course the nurses always make a perfect target for any frustration with the delay.


    Exactly 15 minutes? Not 14? Or 16? Although I'm sure your perception of time was better than the man with "shaky" mental status, who couldn't remember to call for assistance but knew the exact amount of time he'd been sitting on the side of the bed. I'm sure in your time as an ICU nurse you've NEVER had someone perceive their wait for you to be longer than it actually was.[/QUOTE
    As far as pharmacy-we have the same issues and 99% of the time the issue is on the pharmacy side and we always get blamed.
    The man sitting on the side of the bed, short of breath, weak and in liver failure was my husband. It wasn't 15 minutes-he said it was almost an hour. I looked back on his monitor and saw how long he was disconnected and he was right. My point was someone somewhere (i.e. his nurse) should have checked instead of listening to his alarm going off. It's simply a safety issue. What if he coded? How long would it take for them to realize it? After he became a vegetable or dead? He had a clock in front of him on the wall, so I tend to believe that he was correct with that.
    Last edit by blueheaven on Mar 29, '13
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    And NO I do not feel superior to anyone else. I'm too tired for all that pat myself on the back and "me wonderful me" crap. We all have our days and we all have families and patients and visitors who absolutely pluck our last nerve and our sympathy and empathy. I just try to do the best that I can on those days. Sometimes I fall short and fail but I pick up and keep going as I know many other hard working nurses do everyday. So no wooh and ocn.
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    blueheaven...I cannot IMAGINE the anger I would feel if that had happened to my loved one. And let me CLARIFY----I would *NOT* be angry (or feeling superior) if I saw that the people taking care of my hubby were BUSY!!! The fact that they were standing around with their phones and it took them a long time to acknowledge you, AND you say the nurse gave you "attitude".....nope, not acceptable! (I hope your hubby is okay!)


    I'm so NOT superior to **anyone**--- It's coworkers who actually IGNORE patients because their facebook status update / playing "Candy Crush" is more important that infuriate me!!!
    Last edit by nervousnurse on Apr 4, '13 : Reason: forgot something


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