Nurse Mobbing/bullying - page 12

:balloons: I am new to the forum and would like to get feedback from others who have experienced mobbing/bullying/harassment in the healthcare field. Please share so others might learn more about... Read More

  1. by   Jo Dirt
    I work with a male RN in home health but he has been nothing but nice and helpful and is very charming. The little old ladies love him.
  2. by   pickledpepperRN
    Here is another article and book:
    http://www.nursingpower.net/abuse/abuse.html
  3. by   chadash
    Quote from spacenurse
    Here is another article and book:
    http://www.nursingpower.net/abuse/abuse.html
    Went to that site and found this quote:
    Hospital restructurings and downsizing have slashed bedside nursing staff - the backbone of the hospital - and have replaced RNs with poorly trained and poorly paid nursing assistants. Those RNs who remain at the bedside must now care for greater numbers of sicker patients who are assembly-lined through the hospital in shorter and shorter periods of time".

    This really worries me. Do you all see this happening?
  4. by   JessicRN
    I to grew up with 5 brothers when we had an arguement or disagreement we would talk it out (yell when we were younger) but after the initial outburst and discussion it was over no grudges were held. In the military I was surrounded by male med aides and they were wonderful. I miss them.
    I used to be angry at them now I just pity them. Take a look at the person doing the bullying, you will see she/he usually has has a hidden low self worth and has a lot of problems outside the hospital. I is sort of the kick the cat syndrome. If a nurse had empowerment and was respected more by the medical staff (less pt/nurse ratio,no mandated OT) I have a feeling akot of the bullying would stop. For the rest of the bullies. I believe the way for administration to deal with them is not to ignore it to immediately address it and to obligate both to seek EAP councelling just like the Police do.That way both get the help they need. A stressed or overwhelmed nurse cannot be an effective employee
  5. by   chadash
    Quote from JessicRN
    I to grew up with 5 brothers when we had an arguement or disagreement we would talk it out (yell when we were younger) but after the initial outburst and discussion it was over no grudges were held. In the military I was surrounded by male med aides and they were wonderful. I miss them.
    I used to be angry at them now I just pity them. Take a look at the person doing the bullying, you will see she/he usually has has a hidden low self worth and has a lot of problems outside the hospital. I is sort of the kick the cat syndrome. If a nurse had empowerment and was respected more by the medical staff (less pt/nurse ratio,no mandated OT) I have a feeling akot of the bullying would stop. For the rest of the bullies. I believe the way for administration to deal with them is not to ignore it to immediately address it and to obligate both to seek EAP councelling just like the Police do.That way both get the help they need. A stressed or overwhelmed nurse cannot be an effective employee
    :yeahthat:
  6. by   HarryPotter
    I absolutelly agree.
    I recently did research for the company I work for on Nurse Retention and Recruiting. In the surveys I did and read, all talked about the number one value that Nurses look for in an employeer is that they are respected and valued as professionals and knowledge workers.
    The bullying that occurs within the healthcare industry could very well be
    associated with the lack of respect.
    Unfortunately, many Managers are not respectful and the staff under them
    learn that kind of management style: micromanaging, being part of gossipping or allowing it to go on, etc.
    I do see more females being part of the bully/victim mentality. And, tholgh I had not looked at this before, perhaps it is done more by women as a reation of being discrimiinated against for so long.
    Salary is, of course, very important, but I found that if respect and being valued is not there, a Nurse would rather work for an employeer who does respect and value them even with a lower salary.
    Sign on bonuses, etc., will just get a nurse in the door, and then out the back if respect and value is not there, to say nothing about the bully mentality.
    What do you think? And what can we do about it?
    Last edit by HarryPotter on Jun 2, '06 : Reason: spelling errors
  7. by   HM2VikingRN
    Quote from HarryPotter
    Unfortunately, many Managers are not respectful and the staff under them
    learn that kind of management style: micromanaging, being part of gossipping or allowing it to go on, etc.
    I do see more females being part of the bully/victim mentality. And, tholgh I had not looked at this before, perhaps it is done more by women as a reation of being discrimiinated against for so long.
    Salary is, of course, very important, but I found that if respect and being valued is not there, a Nurse would rather work for an employeer who does respect and value them even with a lower salary.
    Oh how true! I took a demotion to get away from bullying female bosses.
  8. by   HM2VikingRN
    Quote from Daffodildeb
    You need to document and document and document. You present some kind of "threat" to these narcissistic, jealous, insecure individuals. Remember: Only the best are bullied!

    Be blessed!

    Deb
    Thank you for posting a comment that helps me in my recovery from a bully boss.
  9. by   Nurseynurseyme
    Quote from HM2Viking
    Thank you for posting a comment that helps me in my recovery from a bully boss.
    I just read this whole thread, I know I am late to the game and all but thanks everyone for these stories! I had never before heard of mobbing.

    I changed careers and graduated my RN last year and I have experienced these things. I am known to have a backbone and to be a straight shooter, but because I was so inexperienced I really didn't realize what was going on. I was mobbed and let go but I was given no legitimate nuts and bolts reason.

    I decided I was better off, and I am; I found a place with a kind and experienced, understanding DON and a true leader that practices encouragement (what a concept) and they are happy with me there.

    The idea to ask "What can we do to help this new nurse?" when overhearing people gripe about someone is a great idea. The poster that said to call the police for assault when a chart is thrown is also an excellent idea.

    I have come to realize I had a hostile work environment and I probably should have pursued that avenue; but since several other classmates have gone thru similar situations, I think that this facility will not "hear" it.

    So, at this stage of my life, I think it's best to just move on and find a better place when this happens! Less getting myself all ground up!

    Thanks, everyone, for the support, even if you didn't realize you would be helping a newer nurse all this time later!

    :heartbeat

    I walk my BSN soon. After that, I don't know what I want to do! :mortarboard:
  10. by   Simplepleasures
    Mobbing happens from fellow nurses(SAD) and from management(par for the course).If the mobbing is in retaliation for reporting illegal/ unethical practices in your facility, you may be protected by a retaliation protection law in your state. I speak from first hand experience here, I say nurses need to educate themselves , in some basic employment laws( federal and state)and how they may or may not be protected from illegal activities in the workplace. Call an employment lawyer who represents the employee , ask if they will give you a free consultation, tell your story, you may be surprised to learn there ARE laws out there that DO protect you.
  11. by   Nurseynurseyme
    That is sage advice.

    I was pretty caught up in my own private stuff at the time, burying my parents, going back to school after way too long, moved many miles to get there, etc. For a while I was buying into it thinking it was me.

    It's been too long now for any type of legal action. The statute of limitations has lapsed. But still it would be a good idea to know the law in my state!

    Thanks again~
  12. by   chadash
    It has been a long time since I have posted, so I hope you don't mind me posting in the nurse section.
    I so so feel compassion for those who have experienced the very real problem of bullying and mobbing in the workplace. Unfortunately, there is no simple solution.
    I urge you to leave, and pray!
    I am blessed at this time to be working for management that has no tolerance for this.
    Yes, there are work places out there where, despite the stresses, where people allow you to be imperfect and human. It is very healing! I have had such great kindnesses and helpful advice, I have lost the urge to duck and cover.
    I understand that those who have not experienced this would doubt these stories. Frankly, I would have wondered myself. Past experience just did not prepare me for the school yard mentality in some work places.
    Find a sane, safe work place. You will have the unique experience of thanking God and kissing the ground you walk on, just because no one is beating you up!
    There are some helpful web sites on bullying out there that help you identify why you may be the target of this activity. Understanding yourself, and understanding that some function in a way that you may never fully understand, takes some of the power out of this.
    Also, every work place conflict is not this, and sometimes, some people just don't like you. That is hard for those of us that like every one, but we have to understand. But, you don't have to stop being you. Don't stop liking people, just be wise, be careful.
  13. by   HM2VikingRN

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