Most shocking thing you've seen another nurse do? - pg.6 | allnurses

Most shocking thing you've seen another nurse do? - page 6

SNF. RN supervisor summoned (overhead, at about 0300) me to one of her rooms. She was attempting to insert an NG tube in an alert man, about 40, alcoholic, with varices. Told me she felt a... Read More

  1. Visit  dudette10 profile page
    1
    Quote from brithoover
    What is caul?
    "En caul" is when a baby is delivered with the sac intact and the baby inside it, I believe.
    nrsang97 likes this.
  2. Visit  monkeybug profile page
    0
    Quote from dudette10
    "En caul" is when a baby is delivered with the sac intact and the baby inside it, I believe.
    Spot on, and correct!
  3. Visit  Chixie profile page
    3
    Quote from dudette10
    "En caul" is when a baby is delivered with the sac intact and the baby inside it, I believe.
    It is believed to be good luck in some cultures
    Bezoars, Kipahni, and hikernurse like this.
  4. Visit  smile_through_it profile page
    2
    Saw a nurse who went against protocol and pulled 'Tylenol' for a patient and gave it without using our electronic MAR (scan pt, scan med) and gave the pills... she went back an hour later to scan it, she gave 2 lopressor pills instead of 2 Tylenol..
  5. Visit  RNitis profile page
    3
    Quote from kjm84
    This thread is making me nervous to graduate in May. All these crazy errors that kill people. :-\ Hope I never give someone a story like these to tell.
    I've recently started working as a nurse, and trust me, I feel the same! The best thing us to have a constant fear, so that way you always double check yourself. And the biggest rule is NEVER ASSUME!! If u have any doubt, don't be scared to ask. I'd rather people think I'm stupid than be a murderer..
    macfar28, TriciaJ, and barachi like this.
  6. Visit  tyvin profile page
    0
    Quote from AJJKRN
    [COLOR=#003366]Baubo516, Hopefully this helps answer your question and makes sense

    In my facility we often get orders to replace the amount of a patients NG tube drainage. The order will say to replace 1/2 of the NG output with NS IVF over 8 hours and will show up in the MAR at 1400, 2200, and 0600 and Here's how it goes:

    NG tube drainage was 600 cc over 8 hours

    Divide the 600 cc in half and then divide by 8 hrs = 25 cc/hr

    Titrate Pt 0.9 or NS IVF to 25 cc/hr to help replace fluids lost from GI system

    *The replacement fluids may be the primary fuid or piggy-backed into the primary fluids in which case only the replacement fluid is titrated and if piggy-backed into a primary IVF, that IVF stays the same.
    I have got to be missing something...600 divided by 2 then divided by 8 = I don't get 25, what am I doing wrong? I've got an eye for figures and it didn't seem right so I actually did the math and didn't get 25. Even if you wanted to double check yourself and figured 8 x 25 it should come out to the original half...it doesn't.

    I know this is only an example but it could stick in somebodies mind as correct. That is if it is correct.
  7. Visit  KCMnurse profile page
    0
    Quote from dudette10

    "En caul" is when a baby is delivered with the sac intact and the baby inside it, I believe.
    I have never heard that term before. When I worked L&D my first precip delivery was "under the veil" as they called it. Took me a few seconds to figure out why the bulb syringe couldn't enter the nose or mouth. The membranes were transparent. I was told it was supposed to be good luck. Different strokes for different folks I guess!
  8. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    11
    Once had a charge nurse who could be observed running AWAY every time a code was called on our unit. That problem was solved when they promoted him to manager.

    There was the nurse who gave a patient's family her hospital ID so "they could have free parking when they visit." It obviously never occurred to her that they'd also have easy access to the parts of the hospital that are normally closed to family members. Then security questioned her about why she had been trying over and over to badge into pharmacy after it was closed for the night . . . .

    The nursing student who was very concerned about giving the MOM as the patient was NPO. Another student told her to give it "in the butt." So she did. IM.

    Then there was the brand new medical resident who had never defibrillated anyone before. The patient was in SVT, dropping blood pressures, but he defibrillated the nurse who was unfortunate enough to have her hands on the patient when he hauled off and zapped her. The nurse went to ER. The patient remained in SVT and the respiratory therapist (brave man that he was) wrestled the intern to the ground to get the paddles away from him.

    Which reminds me of the pulmonolgist who had an ongoing hate affair with the cardiac surgeon who boinked his wife during the Christmas party. He hauled off to whack the cardiac surgeon in the face with a metal chart, and as his arm swung back, he clocked the NP who was coming up behind him. She needed stitches. Pulmonologist kept saying "I'm sorry, I'm sorry. I was trying to hit HIM."
    macfar28, silverbat, TriciaJ, and 8 others like this.
  9. Visit  prunejuice&BPs profile page
    1
    Wow! this sounds like a script out of a bad movie are you kidding???
    hikernurse likes this.
  10. Visit  KCMnurse profile page
    2
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Once had a charge nurse who could be observed running AWAY every time a code was called on our unit. That problem was solved when they promoted him to manager.

    There was the nurse who gave a patient's family her hospital ID so "they could have free parking when they visit." It obviously never occurred to her that they'd also have easy access to the parts of the hospital that are normally closed to family members. Then security questioned her about why she had been trying over and over to badge into pharmacy after it was closed for the night . . . .

    The nursing student who was very concerned about giving the MOM as the patient was NPO. Another student told her to give it "in the butt." So she did. IM.

    Then there was the brand new medical resident who had never defibrillated anyone before. The patient was in SVT, dropping blood pressures, but he defibrillated the nurse who was unfortunate enough to have her hands on the patient when he hauled off and zapped her. The nurse went to ER. The patient remained in SVT and the respiratory therapist (brave man that he was) wrestled the intern to the ground to get the paddles away from him.

    Which reminds me of the pulmonolgist who had an ongoing hate affair with the cardiac surgeon who boinked his wife during the Christmas party. He hauled off to whack the cardiac surgeon in the face with a metal chart, and as his arm swung back, he clocked the NP who was coming up behind him. She needed stitches. Pulmonologist kept saying "I'm sorry, I'm sorry. I was trying to hit HIM."
    I'm speechless! I am hoping these did not all occur in the same facility??!!
    esperanzita and nrsang97 like this.
  11. Visit  monkeybug profile page
    2
    Quote from KCMnurse
    I have never heard that term before. When I worked L&D my first precip delivery was "under the veil" as they called it. Took me a few seconds to figure out why the bulb syringe couldn't enter the nose or mouth. The membranes were transparent. I was told it was supposed to be good luck. Different strokes for different folks I guess!
    I've heard many times that being born with a caul will give the baby psychic abilities. Dont' know about that, but I find most superstitions interesting.
    Kipahni and Hygiene Queen like this.
  12. Visit  VictoriaGayle profile page
    0
    Quote from monkeybug

    I've heard many times that being born with a caul will give the baby psychic abilities. Dont' know about that, but I find most superstitions interesting.
    There are lots of superstitions regarding cauls. Sometimes they are red which supposedly means the baby is going to be a vampire.
  13. Visit  HeartRN_09 profile page
    6
    Don't usually hate on other fellow nurses cause we all make mistakes....but...the other morning as I was waiting to give report to the day shift, I overheard one of the other night nurses giving report. She told the oncoming nurse that the pt had a NGT to suction in the LUNG and it was draining green sputum. (obviously it was in the stomach draining bile...not in the lung draining "sputum") And she was dead serious. She literally thought that's what the tube was for. The nurse rec'ing report immediately freaked out asking her why it would be in the lung because it doesn't belong there and when the nurse seemed dumbfounded and couldn't tell her where the tube actually was, she finally just shook her head and went on with the report. How the heck do you graduate nursing school thinking that having an NGT in the lung to drain sputum is OK? I couldn't believe what I just heard.


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