MAs call themselves Nurses at my office..opinions please? - page 3

Hi, I have been an LPN for 2 1/2 years and am a new Grad-RN since 9/2011. I got a job working at a Dermatology Office last November. It's the only job I could get, and I am making the best of... Read More

  1. Visit  wooh profile page
    7
    It's too hard for the physicians to keep with who's a nurse and who's an MA. I personally think the solution is to refer to everyone in the office as a "doctor." Don't want to confuse the patients with different titles, after all....
    Hygiene Queen, DSkelton711, TnRN43, and 4 others like this.
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  3. Visit  Frankie Slade profile page
    0
    It's not about you, it's always about the patient. Everyone should check their Ego at the door, and just focus on the patient. Just focus on providing quality patient care. Who care if techs are called nurses. If you really want status, then go to medical school.
  4. Visit  lisaannjamRN profile page
    0
    GitanoRN...thank you so very, very much for sharing this with me. That was so kind of you. I am so very sorry you had to go through that terrible situation. I am pretty sure it would be the same at the practice where I work. Best wishes to you too!!
  5. Visit  PeepnBiscuitsRN profile page
    0
    No they shouldn't. But I don't think they do it to one up anyone, or inflate themselves, I think it's just an unconscious thing, and the docs don't really help because they do it too...of course if an NP called themselves a doctor I'd like to see the temper tantrum that would ensue.

    When I was an LPN we had to have a little talk with the clinic manager- everyone did, RN's, LPN's, CMA's and Providers and go over who is who and what is what. Honestly, though in the clinic CMA's and LPN's pretty much did the same things, with some small subtleties.
  6. Visit  kcnurse2003 profile page
    2
    Thank you for your question. Please see the first and third articles of the first attachment. The second attachment is directly pertinent.

    I hope this is helpful.

    ******** ********, JD, MBA
    Executive Director, Legal Counsel

    American Association of Medical Assistants

    www.aama-ntl.org

    State disciplinary actions can result in fines and other
    criminal or quasi-criminal penalties for the delegating
    physician, the practice, and the medical assistant.
    Professional liability (malpractice) insurance policies do
    not provide coverage for violations of state laws. These
    policies only offer coverage in civil matters, such as
    malpractice and wrongful death suits


    A medical assistant should never be referred to as a
    “nurse,” “office nurse,” or “doctor’s nurse.” In every state
    this is a violation of the Nurse Practice Act, and can result
    in fines and penalties. All office personnel should avoid
    referring to medical assistants as “nurses.” If a patient
    addresses a medical assistant as a nurse, the patient should
    be corrected politely and pleasantly.

    The delegating physician, the practice, and the medical
    assistant can be sued for negligence if the medical assistant
    does not perform a duty up to the standard of care of a
    reasonably competent medical assistant.

    The ABOVE was part of an article this attorney sent to me in an email.

    1-It's illegal
    2-In my state it's a Class D Felony
    3-If there is an adverse outcome, trial and conviction it is NOT covered by Malpractice insurance.

    It would be in the best interest of the practice, the patients and the staff to NOT identify themselves other than what TITLE they actually are...
    Last edit by tnbutterfly on Oct 18, '12 : Reason: Name and phone number removed
    HazelLPN and lindarn like this.
  7. Visit  tnbutterfly profile page
    0
    Just wanted to give an update on the PA Bills #469 and 470 that I referred to earlier that were awaiting vote by the House and the Senate.

    Nurse Title Protection (Acts 34 & 35 of 2012) – The Governor has signed House Bill 469 and House Bill 470, sponsored by Representative Jim Cox (R-Berks.) The bills amend the Practical and Professional Nursing Laws to disallow the use of the title “nurse” unless duly licensed. HAP had the bill amended to allow for the continued use by individuals of a descriptive title for nurse assistive personnel. HAP supported the bills.
  8. Visit  pink_shoes99 profile page
    2
    Wow, where I work as an LPN, we all have name badges with our name followed by title, but underneath both, LPNs and MAs, it says "nurse". Also, our "nursing educator" is an MA. I love all the MAs I work with, they work just as hard as me, however I know the name badges are illegal. I wonder about the educator?
    HazelLPN and lindarn like this.
  9. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    3
    Quote from pink_shoes99
    Wow, where I work as an LPN, we all have name badges with our name followed by title, but underneath both, LPNs and MAs, it says "nurse". Also, our "nursing educator" is an MA. I love all the MAs I work with, they work just as hard as me, however I know the name badges are illegal. I wonder about the educator?
    You should check the laws in your state.....your employer may have issues. no one is saying that they don't work hard but they don't have the required education to use the "title" nurse. Many states also have educational requirements as to who may educate a "nurse" and what they can educate them for.....if the education is not nursing related ie: general policies, attendance, compliance, fire, HIPAA etc it is probably ok.
    HazelLPN, wooh, and lindarn like this.
  10. Visit  BuckyBadgerRN profile page
    4
    I have a friend who is an MA in a busy cardio office. The MD's call everyone there "nurses" and the MA's love the "bump in status" so they don't tell anyone different. Me thinks this goes on in way more offices than hers. I know the clinic my family utilizes has mostly MA's working day to day with the MD's and when you call to talk to Dr. Brown's nurse, you get an MA. Now, myself, being an RN who worked darn hard for the title and the right to use it will call them out on it (which usually results in "oh, I'm not a licensed nurse, but I'm DR. BROWN'S nurse!") MD's don't care to make patients see the difference, MA's (some, NOT all!!) don't think its a big deal if people are led to believe that they are nurses and nurses look like whiny brats if we look to give ourselves the respect we deserve that comes with having a license that we're proud of.

    Quote from kcnurse2003
    Thank you for your question. Please see the first and third articles of the first attachment. The second attachment is directly pertinent.

    I hope this is helpful.

    ******** ********, JD, MBA
    Executive Director, Legal Counsel

    American Association of Medical Assistants

    www.aama-ntl.org

    State disciplinary actions can result in fines and other
    criminal or quasi-criminal penalties for the delegating
    physician, the practice, and the medical assistant.
    Professional liability (malpractice) insurance policies do
    not provide coverage for violations of state laws. These
    policies only offer coverage in civil matters, such as
    malpractice and wrongful death suits


    A medical assistant should never be referred to as a
    “nurse,” “office nurse,” or “doctor’s nurse.” In every state
    this is a violation of the Nurse Practice Act, and can result
    in fines and penalties. All office personnel should avoid
    referring to medical assistants as “nurses.” If a patient
    addresses a medical assistant as a nurse, the patient should
    be corrected politely and pleasantly.

    The delegating physician, the practice, and the medical
    assistant can be sued for negligence if the medical assistant
    does not perform a duty up to the standard of care of a
    reasonably competent medical assistant.

    The ABOVE was part of an article this attorney sent to me in an email.

    1-It's illegal
    2-In my state it's a Class D Felony
    3-If there is an adverse outcome, trial and conviction it is NOT covered by Malpractice insurance.

    It would be in the best interest of the practice, the patients and the staff to NOT identify themselves other than what TITLE they actually are...
    Mrs.FlowersTheNurse, HazelLPN, wooh, and 1 other like this.
  11. Visit  lindarn profile page
    1
    Explain to me how an MA, can be given the job and title of, "Nurse Educator"? They are not nurses, have not engaged or participated in a nursing education, and therefore, have no knowledge of what a nurses' education consists of.

    If you are allowing this it will continue. I would report it to the State BON, and let the dirt fall where it may. JMHO and my NY $0.02.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
    HazelLPN likes this.
  12. Visit  classicdame profile page
    2
    Protecting our profession is one thing (very important!) but the REAL issue is in protecting the public. We are obligated to report these instances. It is illegal and should be treated as such.
    wooh and lindarn like this.
  13. Visit  BlueDevil,DNP profile page
    0
    In this state, it takes 2 years to obtain a CMA degreee and 9 months to get a LPN. The MAs would be offended to be called a nurse, lol.
  14. Visit  lindarn profile page
    2
    But MAs are NOT licensed medical professionals. I cannot imagine what an MA would study for two years.

    MAs learn technical tasks, that assist an MD to examine patients, and learn/do, other, "nurse like skills", that in my opinion, are used to fool his/her, patients, into believing that they have professional staff looking out for their patients. A medical, "bate and switch", at the expense of innocent patients.

    JMHO and my my NY $0.02.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN ,CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
    HazelLPN and BuckyBadgerRN like this.


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