I am struggling with patient families lately. - page 11

by jennilynn

17,159 Views | 146 Comments

I am fed up with patient families treating the hospital like a family reunion site. I am tired of the family members that insist on staying the night, why? In some cases I get it. But when your boyfriend has the flu or your nana... Read More


  1. 0
    samadams8,

    Reading your posts here I feel a great sense of relief that some sanity is being spoken regarding the family members role in supporting and protecting their ill family member. Obviously, for the benefit of those readers who argue that not all patients want their family member present blah blah, we recognize that not all patients want their family members present for any, very much, or all of their hospitalization, and that there are instances when the family member's presence may not be constructive and even detrimental. Your posts clearly made allowances for the latter kinds of situations. Please continue to educate people. I would love to read an article by you on this subject.
  2. 1
    Quote from dudette10
    Personally, I think you guys are talking from two different places. The vent threads here about families are usually about the extremes, or about minor requests in the midst of chaos that a family loses their **** over when they aren't attended to immediately.

    I don't think anyone is denying the importance of FCC or PCC to promoting healing in nursing, but when the complaints about how those minor requests have not been fulfilled get a nurse in trouble, that's where FCC/PCC gets it's bad rap. Application of it requires context, and, sadly, administration sometimes doesn't care about context.

    In sum, samadams is talking about the importance of it, and Stargazer is talking about the extremes of it, and it's difficult to not get all riled up when, from the start, the two participants are coming from two different places on the same subject.

    That's my take on where this thread went, at least.
    Basically, yes, dudetee10. I would agree with that.
    Esme12 likes this.
  3. 1
    Quote from Susie2310
    samadams8,

    Reading your posts here I feel a great sense of relief that some sanity is being spoken regarding the family members role in supporting and protecting their ill family member. Obviously, for the benefit of those readers who argue that not all patients want their family member present blah blah, we recognize that not all patients want their family members present for any, very much, or all of their hospitalization, and that there are instances when the family member's presence may not be constructive and even detrimental. Your posts clearly made allowances for the latter kinds of situations. Please continue to educate people. I would love to read an article by you on this subject.
    Thanks Susie. Yes, I did try to make allowances and strove to be a proponent of not throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

    Thanks again.
    Esme12 likes this.
  4. 0
    like someone said, there are two views of this subject. What is ideal, and very useful, when families participate in the pt's care/plans. Like I said before, there is nothing I like better when ( especially in dementia pts) a family member stays with the pt. It keeps the pt calm, and the family member can help make decisions regarding their care.
    The problem I had was when we have the " family reunions" , and 10 chairs in a semi room, noise, requests for drinks and sandwiches, etc.Because of the fact that the corporation doesnt allow us to set limits in the almightly name of customer service, this is what makes the job difficult. I am not allowed to set boundaries.I sure wish I was. I mean, now we have concierges, valet parking, etc. Why wouldn't anyone not view the place as a hotel? Visiting hours? Nope, come whenever you want. **** off the family members, you risk ******* off the patient.
    That was my only point, and dissapointment.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Jan 3, '13
  5. 1
    I think it is good to get things off our chest sometimes. We can all appreciate the necessity of having patients families at the bedside and the benefits to the patient. BUT......there are many instances it has gone WAY too far.

    I too have had thoe familiy member that have come into a trauma room during resuscitative effort to demand attention for some mundane complaint, like knee pain for 3 day, and proceed with outrageous behavior until removed by security....only to have our behinds on the carpet the following day because there was a complaint and it is obvious that we "the staff" were not communicating properly with the complaining family. Not that they were nuts/rude/out of line/violating that patients privacy to begin with and should be horse whipped (not really but it feels good to say it) for entering a trauma room for a complete stranger....but we were not nice to the crazy person....even though the arrested from anaphylaxis 14 year old from her friends hot chocolate containing peanut oil has died.......the unmitigated gall of some people.

    We all have opinions and we have strong opinion....we are nurses. We are not known for our retiring nature and mild demeanor......however....... we can agree to disagree politely.

    Allnurses
    promotes the idea of lively debate. This means you are free to disagree with anyone on any type of subject matter as long as your criticism is constructive and polite. Additionally, please refrain from name-calling. This is divisive, rude, and derails the thread. Our first priority is to the members that have come here because of the flame-free atmosphere we provide. There is a zero-tolerance policy here against personal attacks. We will not tolerate anyone insulting other's opinion nor name calling.
    Our call is to be supportive, not divisive. Because of this, discrimination, racial vilification and offensive generalizations targeting people of other races, religions and/or nationalities will not be tolerated.
    The thread and been edited....please be respectful of each other ...or the thread will be closed.
    PalmHarborMom likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from jrwest
    requests for drinks and sandwiches, etc.
    I'm just wondering if someone could fill me in on who pays for the drinks, sandwiches, guest trays and so on. Is this a "cost of buisness" or does the patient end up paying for this on his or her bill. I can't imagine insurance companies footing the bill for these things.
  7. 0
    Quote from Silverlight2010
    I'm just wondering if someone could fill me in on who pays for the drinks, sandwiches, guest trays and so on. Is this a "cost of buisness" or does the patient end up paying for this on his or her bill. I can't imagine insurance companies footing the bill for these things.
    I believe it's all included in the hospital room and board charge, which covers nursing, dietary, housekeeping, linens, etc. Lab work, supplies charged out of the Pyxis, drugs, IVF hours, respiratory, pt/ot, and probably a few other things I'm missing are itemized. Of course, the attending bills separately.I think this is right, from looking at my family's EOBs, so someone correct me if I'm wrong.
  8. 0
    No, our floor is responsible for ordering these things. Must be the cost of business then,
  9. 0
    Quote from Silverlight2010
    I'm just wondering if someone could fill me in on who pays for the drinks, sandwiches, guest trays and so on. Is this a "cost of buisness" or does the patient end up paying for this on his or her bill. I can't imagine insurance companies footing the bill for these things.
    I never received drinks, sandwiches, trays, or the like. What's more, I never asked for anything. The only thing I have did was be close to some very ill loved ones at crucial times during their hospitalization--and to talk with docs when they weren't available. Didn't stay endless hours either. Get the family member past the crisis. That was my approach, and it's probably why 99% of the time, most nurses and docs didn't give me a hard time. When you work in hospitals, you really don't want to be in one on your days/nights off. Did what I had to do, was respectful but assertive when necessary, and then moved on.


    What I am hearing from folks here is with regard to those that abuse the system, so to speak. I am in no way for that, but I have learned to be more tolerant, even when I don't agree. What I have been saying is don't throw the whole deal out b/c of some bad eggs and the need for proper policy and implementation.
  10. 0
    agreed


Top