Do you feel that the doctors you practice with respect you and your profession?

  1. Here is this months survey question:

    Do you feel that the doctors you practice with respect you and your profession?

    We encourage your comments and discussion on this question. To post your comments, just click on the "Post Reply" button.




    [This message has been edited by bshort (edited April 18, 2000).]
    •  
  2. 20 Comments

  3. by   Nancy1
    I feel that my work place has a very special relationship with our docs. I manage a 47 bed skilled unit. The residents for the most part are Lifecare, which means they gave us what they had and we agree to care for them till the end. Because of this unique situation my nurses and I deal with 3 MDs and we have a great working relationship. My nurses do not complain of having to call a doc, because they know the doc will listen. I hope that this is a norm, but then I know that I am very fortunate. NA
  4. by   iamme457
    In general the nurses are respected by the doctors in the unit I work in.
    There are about 50 nurses and 9 intensivists that interact attempting to do what is best for the patient.
    Personality and ideals do conflict occasionally along with opinions. This unit gives a lot of atonomy to the nurses, a great place to learn and grow.
    This is a closed unit(our intensivists are available 24 hours a day in the unit and they write the orders for these patients) 20 bed Med/surg/neuro ICU and usually accepts just about anything even when staffing is questionable. We have an oncall schedule that you can sign up for, you are paid a small fee for every 4 hour period available an if called in get your time and a half on top of that.
    The docs do respect us, even when they are as frustrated and tired as we are.
    Deanna
  5. by   Mijourney
    Hi,

    The nurses in the setting in which I work do receive respect from the physicians. I don't know if the fact that it is not in a direct care setting has bearing on that or not.
  6. by   sr1228
    I am an ER travel nurse with 35 years experience in nursing. I started traveling in July of last year and find that in general physicians do not respect nurses. They ignore the education we are required to have, including ACLS, TNCC, PALS, CEN etc etc. We are expected to run codes properly until the physician arrives, expected to assess patients who have had severe trauma and know enough to start IV's, provide immobilization,keep the patient stable,give O2,have medications available to give immediately upon order or to give as per protocol. And we need to know the doses, how many times has a Dr. asked you to figure out the dose because he/she didn't know? God knows we have to know those protocols and be able to evaluate heart rhythms etc etc. When an attending comes in after the crisis is over does he speak to the nurse who was there when it all started??? No. Most doctors respect the paramedics more than they do us. Doctors don't read our assessments in the ER, and often omit reading the medications and allergies that we have noted on the chart. How many times do we have to ask them to rewrite prescriptions because they won't read the chart. So those of you who think this is happens only in your hospital, as I did, forgetit- it is in a lot of places.
  7. by   M.Price
    As with any profession, the degree to which respect is afforded nurses varies with the staff and the physician. I work on a med-surg unit and we have many doctors who honestly want our opinions and suggestions on the care and potential outcome of our patients; they know we are their eyes, ears, and hands while they are away. Unfortunately, there are other docs who behave as if the orders that are completed and carried out for them have been done by magical fairies and that the nurses on the floor are invisible, or worse yet, the nurses are there as their own personal venting boards.
  8. by   BJA
    I agree, the nurse-physician relationship varies with the facility, the unit, the doctor and the nurse.
    In our ICU, the doc's that we view as intelligent are the one's who bother to seek out the care nurse and ask what is going on with the patient, are there problems or concerns, etc., etc. This type is the overwhelming majority.
    There are a few who do not speak to nurses, do not listen when spoken to, do not return pages, have a poor bedside manner, are unpopular with nurses, patients, other md's and families, blah, blah, blah. These fine (ha) physicians also do not seem to have as many patients, and their clinical outcomes don't seem to be as good.
    These people would be jerks regardless of their profession. It is just sad that they chose medicine.
  9. by   LFMRN
    I HAVE BEEN IN NURSING FOR 30 YEARS AND I DO PRESENTLY SEE A CHANGE IN PHYSICIANS' ATTITUDES TOWARDS NURSES.YES PHYSICIANS THAT I WORK WITH HAVE COME A LONG WAY.A SMALL % STILL NEED TO CHANGE THEIR WAYS THOUGH!!!!!!! I WORK IN A INTERMEDIATE SURGICAL CARE UNIT SO WE HAVE A CLOSE RELATIONSHIP WITH THE SURGEONS AND THEY LISTEN TO US.WE TAKE CARE OF THEIR PATIENTS FOR 12 HOUR SHIFTS AND KNOW THE PATIENTS WELL.IT IS OUR RESPONSIBILITY ALSO TO SAY" THIS PATIENT NEEDS TO BE ON THEIR PRE-OP MEDS" IF INDICATED AND THE PHYSICAN USUALLY LISTENS.HOPEFULLY--MEDICAL SCHOOLS TEACH THEIR STUDENTS THAT THEY SHOULD RESPECT NURSES.WE ARE THE LINE OF COMMUNICATION BETWEEN PATIENTS AND PHYSICIANS!!!!!!!!
  10. by   SSUleader
    I have experienced working with both mean and nice doctors. I work in longterm care and some doctors don't give a damn to what the nurse has to say. Some of them will not even return our calls if one of the patients has a change in condition. Now, is this ethical for a doctor to place themselves on call and not return phone calls.? How can I go about this situation next time it happens?It is just stressful discussing patients with these doctors. However, i commend the doctors who show respect to nurses and their profession. SSU leader.
  11. by   nursedude
    In my opinion.....

    I am not sure who else beside SOME of the patients really respect nurses. I don't think doctors do. I don't think hospital administrators do. I don't think executives at insurance companies do.

    ....BUT....

    If you tell the doctor or the administrator or the executive how they can increase their 401K or increase their revenues(by cutting nurse's jobs) or save money by decreasing a patient's length of stay.

    ...Then my friend- they will respect you.
  12. by   Mary Alice
    No, no, no, no, no!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! And it's sad because the patients are the ones who suffer. I don't know if the area I live in is the culprit, but I am very tired of having to worry about initiating the chain of command one more time. After nursing for about five years in a certain area we nurses have learned enough to be an invaluable resource to doctors and patients, both. And yes, we do have assessment skills refined enough to save a life or prevent a lifetime of disability. Why won't the doctors listen?
  13. by   Kerry Harwell RN
    Absolutely not!! I work in a brand new labor and delivery unit in San Antonio. We are very busy and stressed out enough as it is trying to get this unit on its feet, The Dr's yell at us in front of patients, show no respect for us or for our decisions (EX: turning pitocin off without the MD telling us to do so[this is a NURSING decision]) They treat us as if we are their handmaidens (ex: some expect us to put their boots on their feet). I absolutely love what I do & look forward to going to work and doing my job, but I dread having to deal with these physicians. Previously I worked at a small hospital where the nurses worked closely with the physicians. The nurses there are respected and relied upon as nurses, intelligent people, and caregivers. These big city doctors could learn something from their rural counterparts.
  14. by   Becky RN
    I've been a nurse 22 years and I've worked with literally hundreds of doctors. And for every doctor there is there is a different attitude toward nurses. In my experiences it may be a doctor has a problem with a certain nurse, he/she just doesn,t care for them personally or the way the nurse operates. In some of the hospitals I've worked it was a certain floor or department the doctors didn't like or respect because of the supervisor or the reputation of the particular area. So many factors go into an attitude. You cannot clump all the doctors in one good or bad catagory nor the nurses. Sometimes you have to earn a doctor's confidence then the two can work adiquately together. Doctors also have to earn our confidence (we can be a fickle bunch sometimes) But through it all I've tried to keep the patients interests first and foremost, and sometimes that means swallowing your pride and sometimes it means formally reporting a doctor for his/her incompetency, etc. 95% of the time if you know what you are doing, and are confidant, kind, and respectful, you will have very little trouble from a physician unless they just are a total jirk (and I have met a few). Thanks, BeckyRN

    ------------------
    Becky RN

close