Ageism in Nursing School.. - page 4

Has anyone ever experienced this? I am the oldest in my class (48) and I constantly feel left out or made fun of. I caught a couple of my classmates rolling their eyes when I walked into the Nurses... Read More

  1. by   jemommyRN
    I feel so bad that they are doing this to you. Just really try to focus on the task at hand because you can't change other people's minds or actions. I wouldn't worry about it. (i know, I know, easier said than done).
  2. by   anonymurse
    My whole class is old, I mean everyone has kids or jobs or both. I love it. Nobody wastes time. We get a lot done. All questions are profitable. We help each other out. No backstabbing. Best class of my life.
  3. by   WDWpixieRN
    We are near the end of our first semester, and the students that have dropped or doing the worst tend to be the younger ones....I think a certain amount of maturity is a real asset in this career....not saying that there aren't young ones who aren't or can't be excellent nurses, I'm just pointing out an observation from our particular class...hope things are going better!

    Happy Thanksgiving!!
  4. by   Diahni
    Hey, you never know who is going to decide to use you to vent about their own frustrations. I had a handful of experiences in school, but this one was actually funny. There was a guy about my age, late 40s, whom I had heard was once a prison guard. Once when I was walking into a class, he stood back and said, "Age before beauty." The funny part is this guy has a pot belly, balding with grey hair, and looks like he was never a handsome guy at any age. So from then on, my friends and I referred to him as "Beauty." Then a Russian student was always snotty to me. When I said the clinical classroom was hot (and it was) she made some crack about hot flashes. Why do some people need to act like this? For the brief time they are putting somebody down, they're pumping themselves up. I'm one to enjoy a snappy come back, but in school, I just ignored it.
  5. by   Blueorchid
    I would say immaturity and shenanigans can occur at any age. OP I'm sorry to hear that your classmates sound like they belong in high school and that they're giving you a hard time. However I've seen people in their 20s show a great deal of maturity just as well as people in their 40s and vice versa.

    I see alot of "oh they're immature" comments here which should be noted is ageism in itself. As a 21 year old, just because I'm not married, have children, or have loads of life experiences to share doesn't mean that I don't treat people with respect. Or that I lack common sense for that matter. Mom always said you don't stop learning till you're dead (not entirely optimistic...but to the point) so I really could care less if my classmate is 20 or 55. Regardless of age I'm willing to hear what you have to bring to the table.
  6. by   Diahni
    Funny, isn't it? Even though we're supposed to grow and mature, it seems that some people never do. Meanwhile, some people are born mature. I'm not sure where "horse sense" fits into this equation! But you're right - the "mean" thing that goes on in high school is something that many of us, but not all, outgrow. I would think that when people realize, or are taught what's motivating them to say mean things to other people - shouldn't that stop them from revealing that they have low self-esteem? Nah, self-awareness is part of that pesky growing up business that not everybody achieves.
  7. by   Deb Laf111
    I hope your next semester will change things for the better for you. I am hoping to be accepted in nursing school this fall and I am "older" too. The comments from everyone here are helpful and may help me to focus on having a good rapport with the "younger" ones.
  8. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    Quote from Blueorchid
    I would say immaturity and shenanigans can occur at any age. OP I'm sorry to hear that your classmates sound like they belong in high school and that they're giving you a hard time. However I've seen people in their 20s show a great deal of maturity just as well as people in their 40s and vice versa.

    I see alot of "oh they're immature" comments here which should be noted is ageism in itself. As a 21 year old, just because I'm not married, have children, or have loads of life experiences to share doesn't mean that I don't treat people with respect. Or that I lack common sense for that matter. Mom always said you don't stop learning till you're dead (not entirely optimistic...but to the point) so I really could care less if my classmate is 20 or 55. Regardless of age I'm willing to hear what you have to bring to the table.

    Not exactly, being mature doesn't always have to do with age. Some of it does come with age with MOST people. You can also have a high level of maturity at a young age as well. From life experiences I was forced to be mature beyond my years at an early age. At 18 I had been through a lot of things in life that people twice my age never had to endure, I also had a child and a different set of priorities. No doubt I was mare mature on a certain level then a lot of my peers my same age. I had to be, had nothing to do with me being any better then them, and although I was pretty mature at that age, 10 years later I can see I wasn't as mature as I thought I was.I can remember being 19 and I can remember my mind set at that point. It has changed a lot. Your mom was right, you never stop learning. I wouldn't always though take immaturity as an insult or having to do with age. My 13 year old son is immature, I expect him to be. An 18 year old can be pretty immature, again, I expect them to be. My thirty year old husband who is married, has 4 kids and a lot of life experiences is VERY immature. I wouldn't expect him to be. Maturity and Immaturity does not discriminate
  9. by   mmmc2
    That is too bad you are encountering that with your classmates. On the bright side, patients will be more likely to respect you because of your age. So will the physicians. I'm older and I get a lot more respect and cooperation from patients and Physicians than some of my younger classmates.
  10. by   EmmasPop
    (Age 52) Have to admit I noticed a few odd stares from fellow students in the beginning. But once they got to know me it wasn't an issue. However, my clinical instructors have demonstrated true ageism with their snide comments in groups and the occasional, "what are you doing here" and "how old are you" statements. I know exactly what you mean when you say you get physically ill in clinicals! Just wondering at what age do nurses lose their sense of compassion and empathy for others? Is that the reason they became instructors?
  11. by   caliotter3
    Sorry to see that the OP is no longer a member of the site. Hope that she did not quit nursing school.
  12. by   cmw6v8
    I'm not sure if I have any additional advice to offer, but I wanted to comment about my own experiences. I'm 26, so I'm basically in the same generation as the younger students, but I do feel a bit different, after having completed a previous degree and getting several years of professional work experience in an unrelated field.

    I completed my pre-reqs at an evening program comprised of mostly mature adults (mid-twenties and older, lots of thirty- and forty-somethings), and it was a completely different environment. Everyone was respectful, eager to chat with anyone about anything, never felt weird about asking questions...students just seemed to have the confidence and professional behavior that comes with experience and maturity I guess.

    The younger students in the traditional BSN I'm in are dealing with all the stuff that comes with being a typical college kid. Developmentally they are just in another place, and I think it's good to remember that. Their actions toward you are probably just reflecting their own insecurity and need to fit in. They don't have the life experience that older students have, so they are going to act less professionally, even if they perceive their behavior to be "professional."

    I definitely miss the camaraderie and professionalism of the older adults in the evening classes I took. It was so much more relaxing. My plan to deal with the less mature students is basically to just be friendly toward them, chat with them, but also completely ignore the rest of the stuff that might be annoying to me like cliques, etc. I really just don't care, and I have MUCH better ways to spend my time and energy than trying to fit in or gain their approval.

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