AA hair care racist? - page 3

I was caring for a very sweet AA lady, w/ TKA and asked if there was anything special she wanted me to do for her hair. She got all upset and said I was a racist. I was shocked by this, as I was... Read More

  1. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from i_am_julia
    documented and charted that comment...why?
    cya. the nurse already knows the patient is offended; it is a logical concern that the patient or a family member might report this incident. always best to have documentation to back up your own side of the story.
  2. by   sanctuary
    If you can, go back and tell her what you learned here. Explain that you offer assistance in many ways, and that you would not ever want her to feel bad. If she is DC'ed, just learn and move on.
  3. by   blueheaven
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    What if the pt. tells people "that nurse made a racist comment to me."?
    You are sooo right Marie!!!!
  4. by   shoegalRN
    Quote from sunnyjohn
    All these nappturals. WOOT! I'm napptural too! I wear a twist out or puff. Nappturality? LHCF? DGSC?

    Even as a young woman, it is still a touchy subject. It was wrong for her to call you racict though. Maybe if you go back to her with the info you got here, you can change a person for life.
    Glad to see there are other nappturals on this site. Yes, I'm also a member of nappturality.com username spicypuff.

    To the OP: please dont take it personal. This is a cultural issue that has us kinda "divided" within our culture. This lady is conditioned to see her hair as being "bad" and until she breaks away from the LYE, nothing you can say will change her mind. It's a personal issue within herself and has nothing to do with you.

    Just take what you have learned here for future reference.
  5. by   I_am_Julia
    LHCF, DHC and LTH

    Quote from sunnyjohn
    All these nappturals. WOOT! I'm napptural too! I wear a twist out or puff. Nappturality? LHCF? DGSC?

    Even as a young woman, it is still a touchy subject. It was wrong for her to call you racict though. Maybe if you go back to her with the info you got here, you can change a person for life.
  6. by   TazziRN
    Quote from nurse2be09
    until she breaks away from the LYE, nothing you can say will change her mind.
    Not trying to be the grammar/spelling police here, but I'm genuinely confused. Like the OP, I have learned a lot from this thread that I didn't know, but the word "lye" is confusing me. Do you mean "lie" as in untruth, or "lye" as in toxic chemical?
  7. by   I_am_Julia
    lye as a chemical found in relaxers or perms.

    however, the way that the poster you are addressing is using it is found in a subculture of a.a. haircare.

    Quote from tazzirn
    not trying to be the grammar/spelling police here, but i'm genuinely confused. like the op, i have learned a lot from this thread that i didn't know, but the word "lye" is confusing me. do you mean "lie" as in untruth, or "lye" as in toxic chemical?
  8. by   TazziRN
    Ah....thank you
  9. by   vickynurse
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    What if the pt. tells people "that nurse made a racist comment to me."?
    Actually she shared her opinion of me with a lot of people. It feels like slander, but I doubt there is anything I can do about it.
  10. by   TazziRN
    In that case, I agree with the suggestion to go to her and tell her about this thread, and what you've learned. Tell her you are not a racist (nicely) and that you had no idea that your question was offensive. Ask her if the two of you can start over.
  11. by   vickynurse
    Thanks Tazz for all your suggestions. I'll do that.
  12. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from vickynurse
    Actually she shared her opinion of me with a lot of people. It feels like slander, but I doubt there is anything I can do about it.
    The purpose of documenting the exchange wouldn't be for you to do anything about her allegations, but to protect yourself in case she filed a formal complaint against you or the facility. CYA.
  13. by   MS._Jen_RN
    Your question was completly appropiate. A friend shared a story from earlier in her life as a nurses aide. She worked in a group home for the mentally retarded. They admitted an AA gent. He was their first AA person. They took care of his hygiene like all the others, washing his hair everyday during his shower (and using no conditioning agent). They didn't know any better. They didn't know what was going on until his case worker (an AA woman) came to visit and inquired as to why his hair was brittle, breaking and falling out. She enlightened them.
    Moral of the story: If they had asked the question you did prehaps the poor man wouldn't have had his hair falling out.

    ~Jen
    Last edit by MS._Jen_RN on Apr 2, '07 : Reason: fixed typo

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