Starting a NICU job!!!!!!!!! - page 2

I'm so very excited and pleased to announce that today I was offered and accepted a position as an RN in a level 4 NICU. I'm so excited! I graduate in July and will take NCLEX in August. I start... Read More

  1. by   LuvatravelRN
    one more thing-do you work in labor and delivery also while working in the nicu? as in are you there for the delivery of babies that will be admitted to the nicu?

    thanks again for your help!![/quote]

    No, labor and delivery is another department and where I work, it is at a completely different hospital. I work at a peds facility right next door to an adult facility. So once the baby is born and it is determined they need to be admitted to the NICU, they are brought over via the transport team. Does this answer your question? Now we will be opening a new hospital where the labor and delivery unit will be in the same building. Even still, there will be the L & D nurses and the NICU nurses.
  2. by   noellelynn
    did you go to usf or ut? i am going to apply at hcc for the associates program as it best suits my current situation. (i have to work fulltime during the day, and can only attend classes and clincals in the evenings and on the weekend) I already have a bachelors degree and so usf's 2nd bachelors accelerated program (in a perfect world) would be my goal and first choice of a route to nursing, but that program requires full time comittment for class, not to mention usf is a little more costly than hcc :wink2: so with my current situation it seems my only route would be an evening/weekend program-which ive only found hcc to offer that. i know spc also offers an evening program, but their "evening program" begins around 230 or so i think and goes untill 5ish...i need a program that's truly in the evening, like hcc, which is 5-8 and weekend clinicals. do you know of any other schools in the area that offer bsn programs that would be in the evening. i would like to get my bachelors later on, maybe even masters eventually, which i understand usf has many transition programs for rn's (with associates degrees and with bachelors in fields other than nursing) but first things first! with all this being said, do you think i'd have a hard time finding a job in the nicu out of school, with an associates degree rather than a bsn? this worries me also did you have a clinical in the ER or OR? what made you choose nicu rather than peds? sorry-just full of questions! but THANK YOU!!
  3. by   noellelynn
    I understand what you are saying about L&D being separate from NICU. The babies are delivered and then a team brings them over to the NICU. Do some hospitals have it set up in a way where the NICU nurses are there for the delivery of the baby (if it were a preemie, where they knew they'd be going to NICU) or is it always separate as far as you know?
  4. by   LuvatravelRN
    Quote from noellelynn
    did you go to usf or ut? i am going to apply at hcc for the associates program as it best suits my current situation. (i have to work fulltime during the day, and can only attend classes and clincals in the evenings and on the weekend) I already have a bachelors degree and so usf's 2nd bachelors accelerated program (in a perfect world) would be my goal and first choice of a route to nursing, but that program requires full time comittment for class, not to mention usf is a little more costly than hcc :wink2: so with my current situation it seems my only route would be an evening/weekend program-which ive only found hcc to offer that. i know spc also offers an evening program, but their "evening program" begins around 230 or so i think and goes untill 5ish...i need a program that's truly in the evening, like hcc, which is 5-8 and weekend clinicals. do you know of any other schools in the area that offer bsn programs that would be in the evening. i would like to get my bachelors later on, maybe even masters eventually, which i understand usf has many transition programs for rn's (with associates degrees and with bachelors in fields other than nursing) but first things first! with all this being said, do you think i'd have a hard time finding a job in the nicu out of school, with an associates degree rather than a bsn? this worries me also did you have a clinical in the ER or OR? what made you choose nicu rather than peds? sorry-just full of questions! but THANK YOU!!
    No need to apologize....I don't mind offering my opinion:wink2:

    I attended USF and I was in the accelerated 2nd Bachelor's degree program. You are right, it does require a full-time committment - I worked full-time in the beginning only because all of my classes except for one were online. After the first semester, I did go part-time and my schedule was very flexible. I do not know of any other programs outside of what you have mentioned...I think you got'em all!!!!!!

    In regards to finding a job in the NICU with an ASN, I don't think that twill be a problem. I think that an LPN would have more of a problem since many facilities are leaning more towards hiring RNs (from what I have been told). I know where I work, it is my understanding that they will only hire an LPN who is enrolled in an accredited BSN program. And yes, as you have stated there are many bridge programs for ASN --> BSN, so you will be fine in that regard. You may just want to do some research, like if you have an idea of where you would like to work, speak with that hospital's nursing recruiter or a nurse in that particular department.

    I did have ER and OR clinical experiences and enjoyed them both, but the NICU was different. I have worked as a tech in a pediatric facility for over a year and thought that I wanted to do med-surg peds prior to my time in the NICU. If I had not been offered a position in the NICU I would have definitely worked in peds...I don't like adult care, unless it's L/D, ICU, or Trauma (no adult Med-Surg for me ).

    Keep the questions coming if you need any more input....
  5. by   LuvatravelRN
    Quote from noellelynn
    I understand what you are saying about L&D being separate from NICU. The babies are delivered and then a team brings them over to the NICU. Do some hospitals have it set up in a way where the NICU nurses are there for the delivery of the baby (if it were a preemie, where they knew they'd be going to NICU) or is it always separate as far as you know?
    I am not sure...I can just speak to what I have seen where I work. You also have to consider the level of NICU too - I think only certain level NICUs can care for certain diagnoses due to equiment needs, physicians, etc. You may have to research this a bit more because I am not 100%.
  6. by   noellelynn
    It seems that you are happy where you worked as a tech, also happy with where your clinicals were, that you are accepting a position at the same facility now in nicu-if you dont mind me asking which facility? I understand there are only a few hospitals in fl which have level III nicu..tampa general and all childrens being two I believe. I am asking only because it seems which hospital you work in and their culture and environment can make a HUGE difference, so I wanted someone opinon on a hospital they recommend and hold high regard to. You said this is a 2nd degree for you-what was your first degree in? How did youd decide to get into nursing rather than the field you worked in prior? Also you said you were working in peds and you had a shift in nicu as part of that clinical right? so not all clinicals include nicu? because that's one of the areas id really like to get into to see if it's my niche or not...so I just want to make sure I get a chance to get in there..just wanted to see how you managed to do that, or if it was something already part of the peds clinical?
  7. by   RN2B73
    I am still a PRE-nursing student waiting on my acceptance letter. I had my two children young and decided to attend college after they were a little older. I have always been interested in L&D and lately find myself completely engrossed with everything about the NICU. I'm sure once I complete my clinicals I may have a better idea of where I fit but my heart tells me it will have something to do with either bringing little ones into the world or nurturing them once they're here.

    I am so excited for all of you whose dreams are finally coming true and I can't wait for my dayto finally arrive.
  8. by   EricJRN
    Quote from noellelynn
    Do some hospitals have it set up in a way where the NICU nurses are there for the delivery of the baby (if it were a preemie, where they knew they'd be going to NICU) or is it always separate as far as you know?
    That's how our hospital works it. On a routine delivery, L&D staff members manage both mom and baby, but if it is classified as high-risk (multiples, potential birth defects, C-sections, prematurity, etc) then we send a NICU team (MD or NNP, an RN, and a respiratory therapist) to take care of the baby and evaluate the need for NICU admission.

    There is some debate and variation from facility to facility regarding what criteria indicate the need for a NICU team. For example, our teams still go up on all deliveries that involve meconium staining. The thinking is that the presence of meconium can indicate fetal distress and it can also lead to aspiration. However, the vast majority of these meconium babies will turn out just fine and never require more than routine/BLS care.
  9. by   RainDreamer
    Quote from EricEnfermero
    There is some debate and variation from facility to facility regarding what criteria indicate the need for a NICU team.
    It seems like we go for any and every thing. Mom has a fever? We'll be there!
  10. by   noellelynn
    What would be some advice to getting in the nicu fresh out of school? For someone hiring in the nicu what would an ideal candidate be? someone who did a residency or preceptorship in nicu after school? is there a difference between the two? is the best thing to do to look for a hospital that has a program such as a residency/orientation type setup for new grads? is that how most new grads are hired into nicu right out of school?
  11. by   RNin2007
    Congrats! I was in your position last year..was hired last May and was also pregnant (ds was born in Oct. so they let me start after a 3 mo leave, so I didn't start until January). Good luck with it all, its challenging balancing a baby and full time work, oy!
  12. by   littleneoRN
    In regards to the questions about L & D/NICU involvement...every hospital is different. I also work at a free-standing pediatric hospital that is directly across the street from an adult facility that does high-risk deliveries. If there is a known or suspected reason for need for NICU care, an NICU RN, nurse practitioner, respiratory tech, and sometimes MD attend the delivery at the adult hospital and do the resuscitation and transport. They will also fly out to other hospitals in our state and neighboring states for a delivery that cannot be delayed long enough to transport mom to the hospital. So, we have the joys and frustrations of working in a free-standing childrens hospital that also attends many deliveries (see previous posts about working in a childrens hospital vs. delivery hospital). A delivery hospital is usually an adult hospital that has an NICU but is not a childrens hospital and may sometimes (depending on the hospital) transport sicker babies to a children's hospital. Not all NICUs attend deliveries. If this is a specific interest of yours, it will be good to research this prior to applying to specific facilities or ask in interviews.
  13. by   marcopolo59
    you may not need one....infection control issues...where in maryland. I justleft university of maryland..great nicu...congratulations

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