My time in a NICU in Honduras - page 2

Some of you might remember me :) I'm an infrequent poster (I go in spurts) Well, I'm taking my boards tomorrow and to help calm myself, I'm going to share with you all my experiences from my... Read More

  1. by   LilPeanut
    TORCH stands for Toxoplasmosis, Other Agents, Rubella, Cytomegalovirus, Herpes Simplex. If a mother gets one of these diseases as a primary infection while pregnant, it can cause major problems in the fetus, with a variety of congenital abnormalities.
  2. by   muffie
    thanks peanut

    i'm so like not OB !!!!!
  3. by   LilPeanut
    bumping this up because someone was wondering what things were like in 3rd world countries.
  4. by   Sweeper933
    Wow...
    A bunch of our nurses recently went on a similar trip to a NICU in China (I can't remember the exact name of the city right now). It was a large hospital, and the NICU usually had 40+ babies. In China, I guess you have to pay upfront for hospital care, so a lot of the babies end up not being treated at all because their parents can't afford the bills. There was a family there who had twins - one of them had a heart defect and needed to be transfered to a different hospital. They had to wait a week to transfer the baby because the family didn't have the money to do it until then!

    Speaking of parents - they aren't allowed in the unit at all! I can't imagine that! Especialyl since the unit is extremely understaffed - often times at night there will only be 2-3 RNs on with 30-40 babies on the unit! They would tape pacifiers in the mouths and prop up bottles so the babies could "feed them selves"

    Most of the babies were on no monitors - even a few who were intubated.

    They never wore gloves, and would go from baby to baby starting IVs without even washing their hands inbetween!

    Our nurses helped to admit a 32 weeker who ended up intubated... when they came back the next day, they found out that the baby had gone home because the family couldn't afford to pay for the hospital bills!

    They do have a lot of the equipment they need to be a decent unit - they just don't know what to do with it, and/or don't have the resources to do so. The reason our nurses went there in the first place, was to teach them all that we could. They were really receptive to everything that we were teaching them.

    We're trying to get a group to go again next year - hopefully I can go this time.
  5. by   dawngloves
    Quote from Sweeper933
    Wow...
    A bunch of our nurses recently went on a similar trip to a NICU in China (I can't remember the exact name of the city right now). It was a large hospital, and the NICU usually had 40+ babies. In China, I guess you have to pay upfront for hospital care, so a lot of the babies end up not being treated at all because their parents can't afford the bills. There was a family there who had twins - one of them had a heart defect and needed to be transfered to a different hospital. They had to wait a week to transfer the baby because the family didn't have the money to do it until then!

    Speaking of parents - they aren't allowed in the unit at all! I can't imagine that! Especialyl since the unit is extremely understaffed - often times at night there will only be 2-3 RNs on with 30-40 babies on the unit! They would tape pacifiers in the mouths and prop up bottles so the babies could "feed them selves"

    Most of the babies were on no monitors - even a few who were intubated.

    They never wore gloves, and would go from baby to baby starting IVs without even washing their hands inbetween!

    Our nurses helped to admit a 32 weeker who ended up intubated... when they came back the next day, they found out that the baby had gone home because the family couldn't afford to pay for the hospital bills!

    They do have a lot of the equipment they need to be a decent unit - they just don't know what to do with it, and/or don't have the resources to do so. The reason our nurses went there in the first place, was to teach them all that we could. They were really receptive to everything that we were teaching them.

    We're trying to get a group to go again next year - hopefully I can go this time.
    Oh yeah. I saw that on some show. This man's wife had twins and they needed to go to another hospital, but he had to cough up the money first!
    I wish I could remember the show.There was another hospital in India where you had to bring your own sheets and there were cats running around the ward. Gosh! What WAS that show!
  6. by   crazylilkelly
    thanks for sharing your amazing story!!! i was wondering, does that hospital take nursing student volunteers on a year-round basis? i would love to do something like that over my x-mas break coming up. thanks again.
    ps-congrats on the job
  7. by   kitty29
    Wonderful thred!
  8. by   CookyMom2008
    My husband was born in Honduras and I am a nursing student. We plan to visit his family there sometime after I graduate LPN and before I start RN classes. I am always looking for information about his country and found this very interesting. Thank you for sharing.:wink2:
  9. by   NeoNurseTX
    thanks for sharing! i've always wanted to do some sort of medical mission but didn't know there was a need for NICU nurses. so far it's mostly OR teams..i have hope now!
  10. by   babyNP.
    Ogh. I physically flinched when I read about the 18 gauge needles...

    Those poor babies who just need some proper care...and me with a kid on 100%, oscillator, nitric, desats, massive head bleeds...seems like the resources aren't balanced.

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