fentanyl

  1. gus how you are doing these days .
    first of all I went to say thanks for all of you for helping me .
    I went to ask questions if doc order 6 meg of fentanyl how much ml should I give?
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   Gompers
    Quote from mawjood
    gus how you are doing these days .
    first of all I went to say thanks for all of you for helping me .
    I went to ask questions if doc order 6 meg of fentanyl how much ml should I give?
    That depends on how concentrated the solution is, we can't answer that for you without more information.
  4. by   BittyBabyGrower
    Need more info. Also, if you are truly giving that much Fent. your kiddo is at high risk for chest rigidity.
  5. by   babynurselsa
    Fent comes in 100 micrograms per ml.
    This should answer your queastion.
  6. by   Gompers
    Quote from babynurselsa
    Fent comes in 100 micrograms per ml.
    This should answer your queastion.
    Not on all units. We don't get the premade fentanyl vials. Ours is already diluted by pharmacy to 10 mcg/ml. We get new vials everyday of pharmacy-made fentanyl, morphine (0.1 mg/ml and 1 mg/ml), and ativan (0.1 mg/ml).

    I've given 6 or more mcg pretty often - we give 2 mcg/kg for big procedures like intubation, so if the kiddo is over 3 kilos it's going to be a large dose. Definitely need to give very slowly though, over about 5 minutes. I love when a baby is on a fentanyl drip already because then we can just bolus them on the Smartpump, which will give it over 5 minutes automatically so you don't have to stand there doing it yourself.
  7. by   mawjood
    I know that fent concentrations in our 0.1mg\ml the one pharmacy prepation as fent drip .
    I went to know how much mcg equal mg or ml ???????????????
  8. by   lovemyjob
    that is 100mcg/ml. what pharm sends for a gtt is going to be far more concentrated than what u use 4 a bolus.
  9. by   NRSKarenRN





    each of the units you are asking about are masses - usually used to indicate the amount of medication delivered per dose - and are generally seen written as "mg per tablet," or "mcg per ml," etc. the "g" in each refers to "grams", and since this is metric, we only have to decipher the prefixes to know the units (for a list of s.i. prefixes, click here). the first one is straightforward, "m" is the prefix for "milli-" meaning "one-thousandth of", so 1 mg is "one milligram", or "one thousandth of a gram." the second prefix, "mc", is a bit trickier, since it is not an s.i. prefix. "mc" is a medical abbreviation for "micro-" meaning "one millionth of." the s.i. prefix for "micro-" is "", which doesn't appear on most pharmacists' keyboards; hence the usage of "mc" instead. so, 1 mcg is the same as 1 g - "one microgram" or "one millionth of a gram."
    1 g = 1000 mg
    1 mg = 1000 mcg (g)
    so, a dosage in mg's will have a thousand times more medicine than the same value in mcg's.


    http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives...6624.me.r.html

    medical metric conversion tables and dose data


    ml = milli litter (one thousandth of liter), type of volume; 1 ml = 1cc
    milliliter (ml)


    # mg or mcg = potency of drug in # ml = volume

    would be expressed as mg /ml or mcg/ml

    need to read vial as can be differing strength/volume depending on manufacturer and preparation intent: for infant/children or adult.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Dec 15, '06
  10. by   prmenrs
    You may want to get a Neofax. That is a very comprehensive book on neonatal medications.

    They also have a website: Home

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