Why is it so hard to get an RN job in NY?? :(

  1. 0
    Hey Everyone!
    I am having such a difficult time finding a job. I graduated from nursing school in May with a BSN degree and still haven't found a job. I am such a great worker but really don't understand why is it so darn tough. 1/3 of my class found jobs while the other 2/3 including myself has applied to every hospital in NYC including westchester and the 5 boros. I interviewed at 2 hospitals and they both went well but just found out one of the jobs was given to a new grad who is friends with the nurses on the unit. Ugh. I have never felt so discouraged and saddened by nursing but now I feel like I have "the new grad disease." Any feedback would be awesome. Thanks!!
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  3. 8 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I truly wish I had some fabulous words of wisdom to change your life. As it stands, however, the best I can offer is that it's NOT you, it's the state of the nursing economy and the glut of new grads and lightly-experienced nurses out there. Everyone's vying for the same jobs and it's just a matter of playing the odds.

    Make sure your resume is as great as it can be--go to a professional if necessary--and keep applying anywhere and everywhere. I'm assuming that you're applying to anywhere you can think of that might hire a new grad, not just the jobs you want most, yes? Don't discount LTC because you're holding out for acute care in a hot hospital. Not saying you're doing that, of course, just hoping you're keeping all your options open.

    Hang in there. Try to keep positive, and eventually something is bound to turn up
  5. 0
    Apply nationally, get a job and some experience, and then move back to NY. It seems like NY has been really bad for a while. I wanted to move there because I have family there, but chose to work where I could get a job first. And change can be a good thing
  6. 0
    I am from CT and I was thinking about moving to NY to work as a RN. I looked at job postings of hospitals in the area I was interested in and I realized that many NY hospitals are very prestigious, and many of their postings asked for very experienced RNs , which they deserve because they are top-notch and they can do that. You should research hospitals that have graduate nurse residencies and look for postings and see what they are saying in regards to experience, and BSN required. I noticed that many NY hospitals require a BSN and I have an ADN. So I realized NY isn't for me at this point in my life. Maybe you could even look into neighboring states and see how those hospitals are looking. I am from CT and I just graduated in May, I applied to every hospital in CT at least twice, and to all the graduate nursing programs. (Which Middlesex Hospital in Middletown, CT has the best program that I found but that was for BSN so that was not an option for me). I am now living in FL and I was able to find a job on a Med/Surg floor. Florida has a severe nursing shortage, and all the hospitals are looking for experienced nurses as is everywhere else. I endorsed my license. I did not have to take the test all over again. It might be something to look into for you, because I thought NY was tough to break into as well.
  7. 0
    Have you tried looking on craigslist? They always have a lot of job listings, that way you KNOW who's hiring, and you can start there.
  8. 1
    Quote from NS81
    Hey Everyone!
    I am having such a difficult time finding a job. I graduated from nursing school in May with a BSN degree and still haven't found a job. I am such a great worker but really don't understand why is it so darn tough. 1/3 of my class found jobs while the other 2/3 including myself has applied to every hospital in NYC including westchester and the 5 boros. I interviewed at 2 hospitals and they both went well but just found out one of the jobs was given to a new grad who is friends with the nurses on the unit. Ugh. I have never felt so discouraged and saddened by nursing but now I feel like I have "the new grad disease." Any feedback would be awesome. Thanks!!
    Take you pick of reasons:

    The following NYC hospitals have closed within the past seven years or so: Cabrini, St. Vincent's Mid-Town (formerly St. Clare's), North General,Mary Immaculate, St. John's Catholic, Victory Memorial, Long Island College Hospital, Saint Vincent's in The Village, and Peninsula Hospital.


    LICH and Victory Memorial became part of SUNY Downstate's system but that isn't working out as planned and staffing cuts are coming there as well . To all this add the closings of many nursing homes and LTC's in the area.

    All this has been going on while the many nursing programs in NYC, Westchester and other local areas have been cranking out grads ever six to twelve months like clockwork. So you have fewer hospitals but still the same number (more or less) of graduates looking for work. They are up against the scores of experienced nurses sent out to find new jobs when their hospitals/nursing homes closed. The market barely absorbs one group of displaced nurses when another hospital/healthcare system closes and or annouces layoffs.

    If all this wasn't bad enough there was the recent fiscal and econmic crisis that has put NYC hospital's finances (already shakey at best at some) into a tailspin.

    Inpatient admissions are down as are average length of stay. To make matters worse insurance companies and Medicare/Medicaid are cutting reimbursements.

    Long story short times are tough all around for healthcare workers.

    Landing a gig for both new grads and seasoned nurses has become more about who one knows and how to "play the game" it seems. Just as with other employment positions getting a nursing job has become a job in itself.

    Don't sweat your classmate landed a job before you; it's just the roll of the dice and you've just got to keep keeping on. On a brighter note there seems to be an uptick of postings from new grads that have landed jobs. Mind you it is not raining pennies from heaven but better than things seemed several months ago.

    Keeping applying and try to network as much as possible. If you see nurses going to and from duty try striking up a conversation and see if their unit is hiring. Contact your former instructors for references and see if they know anything. If all else fails you may have to bite the bullet and relocate and find a job elsewhere. That way you can come back to NYC as an experienced nurse rather than a new grad.

    Best of luck!

    DGTG
    audacia likes this.
  9. 0
    NS81, you are not alone with your job frustration and discouragement. I agree with you..it is very very tough in NY. I graduated in December 2011 and still haven't found a job. I'm from NY and I applied everywhere in the 5 boroughs, Long Island, Westchester County and Albany.... there is nothing. I applied to CT, PA, NJ also..and still nothing. I have set up careerbuilder account. I think the best thing for new grads such as you and me would be to go South to places like FL or TX, unless you know someone who knows someone who will let you in at an NY hospital as a new grad. But coming back to NY with some experience might better than waiting around in NY forever.
  10. 0
    Thank you all for your comments! I went on a few interviews since this posting and have followed up on phone calls but haven't landed anything yet. I decided to volunteer at a government hospital near my home on a med-surg to try to gain some exposure until I find something. I'm also considering applying for Connecticut or NJ license as well. I'm keeping my fingers crossed and being optimistic that I'll land something soon Thank you all again!
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    I will add that I've met nurses who work at hospitals like NYP from a CPR class and continuing education classes. I've found that some of them are travel nurses. This tells me that hospitals are more willing to spend the money on hiring travel nurses rather than spend the money training new grads because it's probably more expensive for them.. who knows. Travel nurses are oriented on the floor for about 2 days and they have to be ready to be on their own. Training new grads takes months (plus they have to pay you during your entire orientation) and the hospitals have to find proper precptors, utilize their nurse educators, and other resources. It's really bad especially with this many new grads (hundreds, if not a couple thousands) flocking out of nursing schools. :/


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