Getting a CNA job in New York City

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    Hello all. First off apologies if my posting here is out of line -- I'm a CNA and a medical school applicant, not a nurse. I work in a nursing home in upstate New York. I've worked with assisted living, skilled nursing, and rehab patients, and would gladly do all of these again and more.

    I'm planning on moving to New York City this summer and looking for work as a CNA. As nurses who often supervise and work with CNAs and similar workers, I was wondering if any of you could fill me in on what the job scene is like:

    1. Are there any hospitals, rehab centers, or nursing homes in Manhattan or Brooklyn that you would definitely recommend (or NOT recommend) I apply to?
    2. How cutthroat is the CNA market in NYC? My father was born and raised in the big apple core, and he suspects I'd need a bit of cunning, and certainly be able to recognize it in fellow job applicants, relative to a similar position upstate.
    3. My father suspects paying decently, but then understaffing and overworking CNAs, is the only game in town in NYC. Would you concur?
    3. Frankly, are most of the CNAs you've worked with in the city any good? I'm very professional and dependable, and [gasp] even personable with the residents, and the place I presently work has high standards for this sort of thing. We don't hire slackers, thieves, drug users. I think I would burn out very quickly in a setting where my attempts at professionalism were the butt of every other CNA's jokes.:angryfire
    4. Are patients / residents in NYC noticeably more difficult or demanding toward the lowlier workers than in other parts of the country you've worked?
    5. What should I ask for my stating salary, if I have one year of experience and currently make $10/h?
    6. Finally, with a valid New York State license, are my chances of landing a CNA job in Manhattan or Brooklyn even that good? I've seen hardly any ads in papers or the Net for CNA jobs in the city, in contrast to here upstate. I don't mean to sound daunted or defeatist, but a part of me wonders why they'd take a fresh faced dude from Upstate over a slew of pretty, tough-as-nails, bilingual Spanish speaking local women for a CNA job downstate.

    Where DO you find people looking for CNAs in NYC? Is this the kind of job you all but need a connection, or an agent, to land?

    Thanks for all your help

    Dave
  2. 8 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    dave i would like to know this also..i will soon be getting my cna and pct also..
  4. 0
    I think I replied to someone a few minutes ago with the same question. My ID is babbz if you look up my last posts it will come up. Please everyone look for instance at nytimes.com key work:nurses aide and you will get jobs. Also nyp.org and look up my last few posts. Also if you have a year experience you should be getting $12 minimum in NYC (upstate it's a bit different, like Rhinebeck and Kingston areas).

    My problem is finding a job that fits my school schedule!!
  5. 0
    Quote from WanderingDave
    Hello all. First off apologies if my posting here is out of line -- I'm a CNA and a medical school applicant, not a nurse. I work in a nursing home in upstate New York. I've worked with assisted living, skilled nursing, and rehab patients, and would gladly do all of these again and more.

    I'm planning on moving to New York City this summer and looking for work as a CNA. As nurses who often supervise and work with CNAs and similar workers, I was wondering if any of you could fill me in on what the job scene is like:

    1. Are there any hospitals, rehab centers, or nursing homes in Manhattan or Brooklyn that you would definitely recommend (or NOT recommend) I apply to?
    2. How cutthroat is the CNA market in NYC? My father was born andraised in the big apple core, and he suspects I'd need a bit of cunning, and certainly be able to recognize it in fellow job applicants, relative to a similar position upstate.
    3. My father suspects paying decently, but then understaffing and overworking CNAs, is the only game in town in NYC. Would you concur?
    3. Frankly, are most of the CNAs you've worked with in the city any good? I'm very professional and dependable, and [gasp] even personable with the residents, and the place I presently work has high standards for this sort of thing. We don't hire slackers, thieves, drug users. I think I would burn out very quickly in a setting where my attempts at professionalism were the butt of every other CNA's jokes.:angryfire
    4. Are patients / residents in NYC noticeably more difficult or demanding toward the lowlier workers than in other parts of the country you've worked?
    5. What should I ask for my stating salary, if I have one year of experience and currently make $10/h?
    6. Finally, with a valid New York State license, are my chances of landing a CNA job in Manhattan or Brooklyn even that good? I've seen hardly any ads in papers or the Net for CNA jobs in the city, in contrast to here upstate. I don't mean to sound daunted or defeatist, but a part of me wonders why they'd take a fresh faced dude from Upstate over a slew of pretty, tough-as-nails, bilingual Spanish speaking local women for a CNA job downstate.

    Where DO you find people looking for CNAs in NYC? Is this the kind of job you all but need a connection, or an agent, to land?

    Thanks for all your help

    Dave


    hey dave did you score anything? I am looking myself.
  6. 0
    Quote from HOH11225
    hey dave did you score anything? I am looking myself.
    From what I hear, there are plenty of CNA jobs and finding one shouldn't be a problem. Not everyone is able or willing to do the work, so you shouldn't have trouble finding a job. The pay is around $12-$14/hr. (Just a note: Nurse Technicians, who have additional EKG and Phlembotomy training, get paid about $20/hour and often find work at hospitals. This is what I'm training for at the moment). As I'm sure you know, it's not an easy job. You'd have better luck finding CNA positions in nursing homes since they higher far more CNAs than nurses. As far as finding work in hospitals, they tend to be choosier and hire more experienced CNAs or nurse techs. You might find a job at a city hospital sooner than you'd find one in a suburban one. Contacts help in any field you're working in (they certainly can't hurt). I suggest that you apply all over and take it from there. As far as cut throat--I think that goes for higher management positions or a job at a prominent hospital (again, all fields experience that to some extent). I actually think that nursing/medical school is the most cut throat experience IMHO. Good luck.
  7. 1
    Hello everyone,
    I have been working in the medical field for over 15 years. I started as a Home Health Aide, then I took Medical Assistant and now I work as a Nurse Technician in a hospital.
    Through my experience I believe doing your CNA course is the best thing. As a HHA, you dont get paid very well unless its a union job, they start pay very little and the patients think you are their maid.
    As a Medical Assistant, you got to be very lucky if you get a good paying job but they work you like a dog. Basically you got to do everything. Front desk, take vitals, take blood, assist the physician, answer phones, billing, not to mention make appointments. Everyones experience will be different, but its almost all the same, and the pay is as low as $10, some places pay very well like $15, but you have to be lucky. I like my job now, I'am basically a CNA, (Nurse Tech) what I have notice is that every facility has a different name for its Aides, and it pays me the most. I started with 12 an hour now Im up to 18 an hour, and I have been here five years. I have researched the pay in other big cities and the highest pay I have seen is 23 an hour in San Francisco:1luvu:, CA. and 20+ an hour in Seattle, Washington. So my response is research before you move to a new place.
    Good luck to everyone.
    Serendipity, PCT likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from GigiNYC
    Hello everyone,
    I have been working in the medical field for over 15 years. I started as a Home Health Aide, then I took Medical Assistant and now I work as a Nurse Technician in a hospital.
    Through my experience I believe doing your CNA course is the best thing. As a HHA, you dont get paid very well unless its a union job, they start pay very little and the patients think you are their maid.
    As a Medical Assistant, you got to be very lucky if you get a good paying job but they work you like a dog. Basically you got to do everything. Front desk, take vitals, take blood, assist the physician, answer phones, billing, not to mention make appointments. Everyones experience will be different, but its almost all the same, and the pay is as low as $10, some places pay very well like $15, but you have to be lucky. I like my job now, I'am basically a CNA, (Nurse Tech) what I have notice is that every facility has a different name for its Aides, and it pays me the most. I started with 12 an hour now Im up to 18 an hour, and I have been here five years. I have researched the pay in other big cities and the highest pay I have seen is 23 an hour in San Francisco:1luvu:, CA. and 20+ an hour in Seattle, Washington. So my response is research before you move to a new place.
    Good luck to everyone.
    Hi, GigiNYC, I want to ask you about your experience as a nursing tech. Currently I am a new full-time nursing student and looking for part-time work on weekends. I recently graduated from a nursing tech program and, therefore, have no relevant work experience. If I apply directly to the hospitals, would they consider hiring me as a nurse tech (with zero job experience) or would I need to do some type of internship first? My school only offered the internship to CNA's (which I did), but not for nurse techs. I am also certified as a CNA (no work experience). I'd much rather work as a nurse tech than a CNA. Do students usually look for work right away as soon as they graduate from a nurse tech program? What was your experience? Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks in advance
  9. 1
    Hi Maryann,

    It really depends on the hospital. Some hospitals will train you again, but expect to get a lower pay at the beggining. All I can tell you is that there is very little difference with CNA and Nurse Tech. That is just my opinion. What I understand by what a friend told me is that CNA's dont due blood sugars and empty foleys but that is here at this hospital. That is why they started to train everyone as a Tech.
    I do everything except give out medication. I love my job, it is very rewarding, and the nurses are great, we all work together.
    But like I said before it all depends on the hospital, most nursing homes will take you quick. But doesnt mean anything, go out and put all the applications you can and because you are in a nursing program they might take you even faster.
    1lollipop likes this.
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    maryann,
    I forgot to mention, that some hospitals have nursing internships, they are for student nurses and helps them get a glimpse into what nurses do, some times they will keep you on as a tech. I do know of a friend who did volunteering and then applied for a job. She got the job. So look into everything.


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