Am I too old?

  1. 1
    Hi all,

    I'm looking for some advice. I have been seriously considering going back to school and becoming a nurse but I wonder if I am just too old at this point. I will be 48 in June.

    My info: I have a BS in Business from GCC. I looked into the Accelerated program and was shocked by the $65K that I was quoted. I think my best bet would be to go to OCC/Kean. Get my RN and then go on to taking classes towards a MSN. I have already taken A&P I so I think I only need to take II and Organic Chemistry.

    I would take the Master's Classes while working as a nurse so I believe I could be finished with RN part in 2.5 yrs. I'd be 50 at that point. Did I really just type that?!

    One other question. Everything I am reading makes me believe that I would need a BSN to get a job. However, would they take into consideration that I have a BS plus and RN and I am working on MSN?

    I know 50 is the new 40 and I'm definitely a young at heart 47 yr old but I know nursing can be very physically demanding and I worry if it would be too much to start at this age.

    I want to do something that interests me and yet helps people. I want to do something that has real meaning.

    Thanks for any advice you have.

    Regards.
    Godivadess likes this.
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  3. 9 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    I'm 37 years old going on 38. And I just started my nursing education last year. So far it has been mainly the biological science portions since my BS is in physics. I have one more A&P class to take then I can start. I am, most times, the oldest in my class. But I wouldn't let that deter me. I've had a career of meaningless jobs and positions and I feel like nursing will give me more out of life than just a paycheck. Don't be discouraged just go for it. I am told older nurses have an easier report with patients but I'm not sure how it really is yet. Good luck!
    LB_RN2B likes this.
  5. 0
    First, how long ago did you take your math & science courses (including A&P)? If it is not within a specified number of years OCC will require you to repeat the classes. Plus OCC doesn't require organic chemistry for nursing students.

    Many of the accelerated programs are through private universities (like Monmouth) and thus the price tag is rather high. I know Georgian Court's is pretty high. Compared to $65K the current ~$18K estimate for OCC's program seems more doable. (But know that with a prior bachelor's degree your options for financial aid will be limited whether you do an ASN or aBSN program.)

    You can also look into Thomas Edison's new accelerated BSN program, current estimate is $26,900 payable quarterly. Thomas Edison State College | Accelerated 2nd Degree BSN Program

    Some facilities will be happy to have a RN + (non nursing) BA/BS. Others won't care. It's all relative. There really isn't a nursing shortage in NJ. It seems to be who you know to get your foot into the door.

    IMHO age is relative. If YOU can physically do the work, then it doesn't matter how old you are. I know some nurses who graduated around your age. They are happy, intelligent, active individuals who can run circles around some younger & older nurses who prefer to be more sedentary and have no desire to advance their knowledge & education. Point being, some people can be a 'cranky old bat' by age 25. Others may never achieve inactive status until they are in their 80's or 90's.

    There are several RN > MSN programs. Some require a bachelor's first, others specifically require that you NOT have a bachelor's degree in any subject as the BSN material is covered in the first phase of the program. It's relative to the type of MSN degree you wish to pursue (i.e. MSN in education, informatics (IT), clinical nurse specialist, management/administration advanced practice nurse, etc.) Also, you should note that some MSN programs require a specific amount of clinical experience working as an RN for admission, especially clinical MSN programs. Thomas Edison requires 2 years clinical RN experience for admission. Some require a year, but again it depends on the concentration of the MSN program.
  6. 0
    Thanks for the advice and encouragement!

    I hadn't heard about the TE Accelerated program and I like the price and length of program. I am going to call them for more information.

    Driving to Trenton a few times a week will be a little bit tough but it would only be for a year. :-)

    I'm excited to look into this.

    Thanks again!

    P
  7. 0
    Quote from psskclayton
    Hi all,

    I'm looking for some advice. I have been seriously considering going back to school and becoming a nurse but I wonder if I am just too old at this point. I will be 48 in June.

    My info: I have a BS in Business from GCC. I looked into the Accelerated program and was shocked by the $65K that I was quoted. I think my best bet would be to go to OCC/Kean. Get my RN and then go on to taking classes towards a MSN. I have already taken A&P I so I think I only need to take II and Organic Chemistry.

    I would take the Master's Classes while working as a nurse so I believe I could be finished with RN part in 2.5 yrs. I'd be 50 at that point. Did I really just type that?!

    One other question. Everything I am reading makes me believe that I would need a BSN to get a job. However, would they take into consideration that I have a BS plus and RN and I am working on MSN?

    I know 50 is the new 40 and I'm definitely a young at heart 47 yr old but I know nursing can be very physically demanding and I worry if it would be too much to start at this age.

    I want to do something that interests me and yet helps people. I want to do something that has real meaning.

    Thanks for any advice you have.

    Regards.
    To old!!!
  8. 0
    toooo old
  9. 0
    I asked my nursing instructors they agreed you are to old. Good luck.
  10. 1
    I don't think the factor here is age, I think it's finances (with regard to age). You'll be taking time off from working to go to RN school, paying tuition, and THEN be paying for a BSN and master's degree. You may or may not find a job after graduation, I graduated in May 2011 and know a number of classmates who still haven't found a nursing job. They key here is your financial situation, especially your retirement savings and upcoming social security benefits. Master's credits are very expensive, interest on student loans is high, and student loan debt can not be discharged in bankruptcy. If you do not pay your student loans, the government will garnish your social security checks. So if you're independently wealthy, do not need student loans, and have no worries about funding your retirement, I say follow your dreams and become a nurse. If this is not the case, I'd say stick with your current career, save for retirement, don't spend money on tuition and student loan interest, and don't jeopardize your social security benefits.
    lakergurl247 likes this.
  11. 0
    Age is just a numberYou're never too old to change your life and to take a diff routeI'm 27 and my mom is 50 she's got more energy than I do. She's a preschool teacher and I'm so proud of my mom how she's able to stand all day. I can't do the work/job that my mom does. I'm even encouraging her to go back to school perhaps an ultrasound tech wouldn't be a bad idea lolGood luck to you an remember you're the only one in control of your surroundings
  12. 1
    I would never say that someone is "too old to be a nurse." But you do need to be realistic about the realities of your situation -- both in terms of age and finances.

    I notice that the previous poster who says that "age is just a number" is only 27 years old -- and her mother is only 50. Neitheir of them has yet to experience some of the physical and mental issues that come with age over 50 that will influence your ability and desire to work certain nursing jobs. Have you ever worked the night ****? rotating shifts? holidays? etc. How is your body going to handle the physical stresses of nursing 10 years? etc. While everyone wants to think that THEY will be one of the lucky ones whose mind and body functions at a high level well into their 70's, for most people that is NOT the case.

    Listen to what old, experienced nurses have to say about the effect of nursing on their bodies and lives. Then assess your own situation in light of their experience with aging as a nurse.

    The same is true of finances. Young people have long careers ahead of them to pay off any debt they incur during school and save for retirement. You won't. So think that through carefully before you risk your financial security. There are no "scholarships" or "loans" for retirement. At some point in the not-so-distant future, you will have to live off your savings (plus whatever government assistance you get, such as Social Security). Be sure you don't squander your chance to build those savings now.

    As for the BS plus and ADN ... that wouldn't get you an interview at my hospital. As a new grad, we only hire BSN's. Yes, that varies from place to place ... but in most places, the ADN will be a disadvantage even if just a slight one. It may limit your job choices.

    There are lots of ways to help people, not just nursing. If your soul/spirit needs to find more fulfillment than it is getting from your current career ...explore all of those possibilities before risking your financial security on nursing. There are lots of options.

    If you decide that only nursing will give you a life worth living ... then by all means "go for it." I wish you the best of luck. Really, I do. But I have seen too many people in your situation throw away too much time and money on nursing dreams that only disappoint them in the end to not recommend that you seriously consider other options first.
    lakergurl247 likes this.


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