Failed at 75?

  1. Has anyone ever failed the NCLEX RN with only 75 questions?
    If so..what was your test kinda like? (meds, priority, alt. questions, easy?)
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   RNKay31
    You are getting to hyped up, calm down, relax, I am sure if you search on this board, you will find alot who fal with 75, you can pass and fail at any number, wishing you the very best, try to relax a bit.
  4. by   DolphinRN84
    As I posted in the other thread, I did have a friend who I graduated with fail at 75...though I don't know what her test consisted of. All I know is she passed the second time around. Also statistically, more people pass than fail at the minimum. But I agree with Kay that the number of questions does not mean anything. Hope you get good results.
  5. by   EricJRN
    Quote from LenaRN06
    Also statistically, more people pass than fail at the minimum.
    Good posts here. I'll go one step further and tell you that more people pass than fail, period (as long as we're talking about first-time, US-educated candidates).
  6. by   BabyRN2Be
    As others have said, people pass and fail the NCLEX with 75 questions, and people pass and fail with 265 questions. Keep in mind that the prioritization questions are the "higher level" questions. If you've received a lot of these questions, this is a good sign.

    Here's the thread and results of a poll that was done on allnurses, those who passed or failed with 75 questions. The thread may be helpful.
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f118/75-...+Poll%3A+NCLEX

    According to this poll, 218 passed with 75 questions, while 28 failed with 75 questions.

    Best of luck to you!
  7. by   EricJRN
    Quote from BabyRN2Be
    According to this poll, 218 passed with 75 questions, while 28 failed with 75 questions.
    Has been interesting to see this poll develop. Although we're not talking about systematically collected data, it's worthwhile to note that the 75 question pass rate reflected in this survey is within a couple of percentage points of the overall pass rate, regardless of where the exam stops.

    I think it goes toward proving our point that people get too hung up on the number of questions. The odds are greatly in the candidate's favor (assuming a first-time, US-educated candidate) and that's really all we can say.

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