Clinical tidbits I wish someone would've told me. - page 4

by Mully 14,652 Views | 32 Comments

Hey everyone, I'm a new graduate nearing the end of my orientation at my first job on a busy Stepdown unit at my local hospital. Although we don't deal with vents, we do most every common gtt (cardizem, dopamine, insulin,... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from armyicurn
    If you are running pressor gtts or propofol/versed/fentanyl, always make sure you have plenty left in the bag. I had a couple of times where a colleague gave report and stated that there was plenty of juice in the bag. From now on, when I take pt's from that "colleague," we do a full 200% hands on and visual inspection during hand off. If I find a bag running low, I make them order a new one before they go home.
    And if you work in a place that doesn't have a 24hour pharmacy and you do not carry the drip in your Pyxis/Omnicell or whatever, make sure you check first and tell pharmacy or your supervisor ahead of time...don't wait until the bag is nearly empty!
  2. 1
    Quote from armyicurn
    If you are running pressor gtts or propofol/versed/fentanyl, always make sure you have plenty left in the bag. I had a couple of times where a colleague gave report and stated that there was plenty of juice in the bag. From now on, when I take pt's from that "colleague," we do a full 200% hands on and visual inspection during hand off. If I find a bag running low, I make them order a new one before they go home.
    I'm with you there. Except for insulin, since 45mls of it might look like it's about empty but that could easily last the whole shift depending on the rate.
    turnforthenurseRN likes this.
  3. 0
    Good tidbits. Like someone stated earlier urine output is very important. Huge indicator in cardiac output and fluid status for open heart patients.
    Another piece I've learned that when you program your IV pumps double check your rate and volume to infuse. Also know your doses of IV meds before you talk to the doc, not just the cc's. My docs hate when some nurses tell them cc's and not dose.


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