Required to wear girly scrubs - page 4

Hi All, I have a bit of a dilemma on my hands. I am considering accepting a position in a Level III NICU, and just found out from the staff that I will be required to wear lavender scrubs or... Read More

  1. by   nursemike
    Just for the record, my cat, Peaches, assures me that there is nothing inherently feminine about lavender. I tend to respect his judgement on this, as he is surely the manliest of all housepets. Given the opportunity, he likes to sleep all day and run around all night. He isn't terribly keen on hunting, but he very much enjoys fighting and chasing...female cats. Even neutering and middle-age have only settled him down a little bit.

    I probably wouldn't have named him "Peaches," but I'm not going to be the one to tell him it's a girly name. I've seen him when he's mad.
  2. by   craig06
    Discrimination is a pretty strong word. If the department requires a particular color due to organization of departments that would be a little tough to prove. Judging by the emoticons you chose I did not miss any sarcasm.

    I am unsure of the age of people in here but i would say that perhaps those that are younger would be concerned with "feminine" colors. As confidence, experience, and age mellows you the last thing you worry about is what someone thinks of you in a particular color. My wife thinks pink looks good on me and she has bought me several shirts with a hint of pink. I have yet to have anyone say anything to me. Colors do not make you a good nurse or anything else. I still get an eye twitch thinking of the white uniforms I am required to wear by my College of Nursing. It is not a matter of the color but the fact it makes me look like Chef Boyarde and my wife says I look like Nurse Ratchet (One who flew..).

    If the work is important does anything else matter?
  3. by   nursejennie76
    Well I just finished my secind round of awful white uniforms!!!! Once in LPN school, and just finished RN school. The ladies outfit was bad enough, but the guys looked like cheerleaders, it was awful and uncomfortable!!! I will never wear a white uniform again!!! Jennifer
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from craig06
    Discrimination is a pretty strong word. If the department requires a particular color due to organization of departments that would be a little tough to prove. Judging by the emoticons you chose I did not miss any sarcasm.

    I am unsure of the age of people in here but i would say that perhaps those that are younger would be concerned with "feminine" colors. As confidence, experience, and age mellows you the last thing you worry about is what someone thinks of you in a particular color. My wife thinks pink looks good on me and she has bought me several shirts with a hint of pink. I have yet to have anyone say anything to me. Colors do not make you a good nurse or anything else. I still get an eye twitch thinking of the white uniforms I am required to wear by my College of Nursing. It is not a matter of the color but the fact it makes me look like Chef Boyarde and my wife says I look like Nurse Ratchet (One who flew..).

    If the work is important does anything else matter?
    Ah , I love the confidence of a mature man. Nice post!
  5. by   nicuRN2007
    Quote from nursemike?
    Just for the record, my cat, Peaches, assures me that there is nothing inherently feminine about lavender. I tend to respect his judgement on this, as he is surely the manliest of all housepets. Given the opportunity, he likes to sleep all day and run around all night. He isn't terribly keen on hunting, but he very much enjoys fighting and chasing...female cats. Even neutering and middle-age have only settled him down a little bit.

    I probably wouldn't have named him "Peaches," but I'm not going to be the one to tell him it's a girly name. I've seen him when he's mad.
    lmao
  6. by   CraigB-RN
    Get over it. Look how long Shock Trauma in MD wore Pink Scrubs.

    Quote from SteveRN21
    Hi All,

    I have a bit of a dilemma on my hands. I am considering accepting a position in a Level III NICU, and just found out from the staff that I will be required to wear lavender scrubs or all-white scrubs. Lavender I could MAYBE deal with, but all white and even lavender almost makes me want to reconsider. How am I supposed to maintain any dignity while wearing those colors? Any suggestions? Should I approach the manager? Any feedback is appreciated.

    Thanks!
  7. by   jmd
    I think he handled it perfectly. I love the guy threads cause I learn so much about what to expect once out of school. I for one am not a super macho man but I understand that when working in such a demanding environment it's at least nice to be able to feel comfortable with what you wear. As an employer I would prefer my people be focused on the task at hand rather then self-conscious about their appearance. The fact is that standards aren't the same across the board in other professions. Woman firefighters have lower entrance requirements for strength and stamina testing and that I consider much more critical to their job than the color of clothes one wears. Now I would never pursue legal action because I doubt it is an overt attempt to make a group of people feel uncomfortable but the fact is that it does make some individuals uncomfortable and that should be recognized and considered. In a field that is in such demand for people you would think an attempt to somewhat accommodate a huge demographic like males who on a whole do not consider the nursing profession would be a smart idea.
  8. by   Swedenboi6
    I, myself, don't know what I would necessarily do in your position. I am a 3rd year nursing student and a part time CNA on the side.

    In my opinion though, I would probably consider the fact that everybody else will be wearing the same color as you, some what comforting. Look at Malik on ER...he wore pink scrubs for like six seasons!

    I must say though, white is rather yucky! I had to wear all white scrubs through CNA school. And I now wear forest green scrub pants with off white scrub tops for nursing school. Not so bad...

    Just go for it! If it's really that big of an issue...talk with the NM...
  9. by   MandyInMS
    To the OP...glad it all worked out for ya
    I guess if I were a guy I wouldn't be comfortable with some colors either..everyone is diff., male and female...my son wears pink a lot and is a 'manly-man' LOL...I think he wears it to aggrivate his Dad though...even has a T-Shirt that says "Only Tuff Guys Can Wear Pink"
  10. by   worldsoulrn
    Quote from SteveRN21
    Hi All,

    I have a bit of a dilemma on my hands. I am considering accepting a position in a Level III NICU, and just found out from the staff that I will be required to wear lavender scrubs or all-white scrubs. Lavender I could MAYBE deal with, but all white and even lavender almost makes me want to reconsider. How am I supposed to maintain any dignity while wearing those colors? Any suggestions? Should I approach the manager? Any feedback is appreciated.

    Thanks!
    Congratulations on the job offer! I bet the patients won't care about the color of your scrubs. (So sorry about the lavender & white) Look at it this way, when those are old and worn, you, male nurse on the unit, will have some input regarding the replacements.

    "The Journey Is The Reward"
  11. by   mtreyes
    it was a nice topic though
  12. by   pooperscooperrn0624
    I have never understood the concept of changing into scrubs at work-whether you laundry them or the hospital does. We did that about 10 years ago but I feel certain that is old school by now. Any infection control nurses to answer that? Most NICU's I know of have put that in the past. You go to the bathroom, deliveries, do patient care then go to the cafeteria. There is no way to keep yourself sterile. That's what handwashing is all about. What do you guys think?
  13. by   ukstudent
    This has been an interesting thread. To the OP, congratulations on the job and getting some change started. To some of the others that think what you wear does not effect the quality of nursing provided and how staff and families think of you. Please turn up to work tomorrow in a "sexy nurse outfit". Your knowledge will still be there but everyone will think differently of you.

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