"Professional Dancer" - page 3

So this thread is gonna stay in this forum cause I know I will get so much flack if this showed up in the general forum. Well fellas what do you guys think about a "Professional Dancer" transitioning... Read More

  1. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    1
    Quote from jadelpn
    Hmmmmm...I would think that it would make what I am trying to do go a whole lot smoother LOL!! It does beg the question--if you don't frequent these establishments, how would you know? No different than another male--let's say a patient--saying to you "HEYYYYY I see you at the strip club every weekend".... (although I would LOVE it to have the female say "thanks so much, because of your wonderful tips I am a BSN"!!)

    A long LONG time ago, a number of the nurses were prostitutes. So this historically (HISTORICALLY) has been an occupation for those who had "fallen" (or nuns...talk about a study in opposites)
    Anywho, women (or men) can do what they wanna do when they wanna do it on their time. I have seen people in the club with little on, dirty dancing for free...and it could be a heyyyyy aren't you the girl who was dancing with me on Sat night????

    If I were young, cute, liked to dance and needed cash for school I would be allll over it. (Now I am old, not so cute anymore, but I could make a buck on Senior Citizen's lunch hour......)
    Small correction, "nurses" were not prostitutes per se, just that the women often hired to perform the duties often came from the ranks of low and common females. This was mainly because it was deemed not ladylike for an unmarried girl to "care" for a man she was not related by blood. Married women had abit more leeway but it was still frowned upon for decent women to have the sort of intimate contact with men that nursing care requires.

    Florence Nightingale changed all this by being a high born lady who actually provided nursing care to patients male and female.

    Between Miss. Nightingale's methods and her moving the goverence and education of nurses into hospitals "trained" nurses began to take on an air of respectability which allowed the profession to attract nice, decent, law abiding etc girls and young women. Indeed their parents wouldn't have allowed them to become nurses otherwise.

    The various moral clauses in state and facility practice acts are a direct legacy of Miss. Nightingale's efforts. When a nurse showed up for duty in hospital or private home in starched whites and a cap you *knew* you were getting a professional nurse who was a woman of great virtue (or at least in theory, *LOL*), and wouldn't drink, steal, climb into bed with the patient and or try to seduce the master or any other of the men in the house.
    kalevra likes this.
  2. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    0
    Know we're not on this exactly, but it bears repeating often; my previous comments not withstanding anyone with a license or considering entering the profession does need to be aware of "morals" type activity that can lead to an offense or criminal conviction.

    Disorderly conduct is considered in some states a "moral turpitude" crime or offense and can prevent one from holding a professional license or even getting into grad school.

    For instance in NYS the BON requires disclosure of criminal convictions, not offenses such as disorderly conduct. However cross the river to New Jersey and it is a different story. There I believe not only does one have to disclose but that conviction can prevent you from holding a license.

    Nurses in NYS have lost their license for running afoul of "moral character" behaviour which sometimes lead to criminal charges. One recent and infamous event involved a male RN who was caught having a "romp" on a LIRR train.
  3. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    0
    Historically speaking nurses were camp followers. They followed the Armies through Europe and Asia. Enlisted men were not permitted to have "wives" accompany them overseas. Their "women" followed and camped outside the lines. If the husband/soldier died, she had to find a new protector. Their jobs were to nurse, launder, assist with food. Only sargents could have wives along. If the sargeant died, the Mrs. had to remarry pronto or become a follower. They were a hardy bunch.

    Oh, and their is an old British Army saying "Officers have ladies, Sargeants have wives, other ranks have women".
  4. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    1
    Quote from CrunchRN
    I am a female too, but I would say it doesn't matter at all, all that matters is that you are a good nurse when you become one.

    Just be warned it is not the wide open field it used to be and very competitive.
    Yea, and things do tend to come back to haunt you.

    Imagine the patient that received a lap dance, and now he sees that she is his nurse. I'd venture to say there'd be some conflict there, especially as he is more uncomfortable when his wife and kids are around.

    Not judging. . .just saying that things do come back to haunt you.

    Probably best to move away from your area of dancer fame.


    LOL, BTW, at a totally different, um, kind of post.


    Course, I'd be wondering if the dancing helped pay for non-academically earned high grades, if you know what I mean. And that definitely happens.


    For the nurse, I'd say, change your ways, start fresh, and move elsewhere.

    Plus most nurses are females, and the idea of women being objectified is not something many of us find of any real value. I mean, it's not something many of us would feel happy or proud to know about you. No offense, just being honest. It's the idea of being viewed as a sexual object, and how that relates to those many females that seek work in various professions. I can say that after having patients, doctors, and other nurses come on to me many times. Nurses can already get disrespected, and really have to set the limits, so they can function professionally in their roles as nurses. Same thing with female physicians. So, yea, other females will probably at least think internally with an yuck factor. But if you have changed and seen the light in terms of devaluing women by playing to men's objectification of them, in time, we will probably let you slide.

    Short answer. After graduation, MOVE!
    Last edit by samadams8 on Jan 29, '13
    RJmanuone likes this.
  5. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    0
    Quote from Fiona59
    Historically speaking nurses were camp followers. They followed the Armies through Europe and Asia. Enlisted men were not permitted to have "wives" accompany them overseas. Their "women" followed and camped outside the lines. If the husband/soldier died, she had to find a new protector. Their jobs were to nurse, launder, assist with food. Only sargents could have wives along. If the sargeant died, the Mrs. had to remarry pronto or become a follower. They were a hardy bunch.

    Oh, and their is an old British Army saying "Officers have ladies, Sargeants have wives, other ranks have women".

    Historically, nurses were priests and monks and the like, which were pretty much men. It's probably reality that both genders from the beginning of time functioned as nurses, however, the males probably received attention and notice as working in such nursing type of roles, b/c historically and culturally, men have been valued more, in general, than women.


    No I'm not extreme on gender rights. I'm pretty balanced and feel that both genders are good and necessary. I am very pleased, however, that my husband is male.
  6. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    0
    Quote from 79Tango
    Ive seen "Adult Film Star" listed on a Resume.. No joke. It was in Las Vegas so I chalked it up to the area and hit the "Print" button and fwded to HR. Of course they made up an excuse on why she couldnt even come in for an interview! I still wonder to this day if anyone hired her.


    So really, why in the world would you put that on a resume?
  7. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    2
    Males as nurses were common through the middle ages. They founded the first military hospitals during the crusades.

    Many of the first nursing homes, founded during the Reformation were run by married couples. And yes, back then the families complained about staff, funding, and care provided to their elderly.

    Men (usually religious orders) were there when the New World was colonized because let's face us, we females didn't get to travel with Raleigh, Columbus, de Gama. When it came down to the nitty grity nursing back home, it was performed by the poorer women of society.
    kalevra and RJmanuone like this.
  8. Visit  RJmanuone profile page
    1
    I think i have studied something about "Dark ages of Nursing" during my first year in Foundations of nursing... was not all that found about the foundations, hehe, but i've done a quick wiki and heres -" Industrial class women took in work or went out to work. As nursing was not considered acceptable even to the industrial classes nurses were usually immoral, drunken, illiterate, and/or prostitutes. Nurses were considered to be the lowest level of human society. A decline in the quality of publick service for the sick was noticeable twoards the end of the middle ages.
    It took about 200 years for the public to recognize the need to pay for quality nursing care to restart vocational desirability."

    So i guess, this has been an age old discussion...
    kalevra likes this.
  9. Visit  RJmanuone profile page
    0
    from samadams8
    It's the idea of being viewed as a sexual object, and how that relates to those many females that seek work in various professions. I can say that after having patients, doctors, and other nurses come on to me many times. Nurses can already get disrespected, and really have to set the limits, so they can function professionally in their roles as nurses.

    i guess thats something i too agree on...
    Last edit by RJmanuone on Jan 30, '13 : Reason: sorry i'm not getting the quote thing to work...
  10. Visit  uRNmyway profile page
    1
    In this day and age, I find it so funny that being a dancer is something one would worry about. Ever been to a club/bar, gotten hammered, and had some less than desirable behavior? Think none of those could end up being your patients? Think that someone could have taken a picture and posted it online?
    What about that one night stand you had with that person you met at the bar/club when you were hammered, or heck, even a vengeful ex? They could take pictures/video without your knowledge, then share, and voila! Instant internet porn star.

    Whatever one does outside the hospital should have no effect on your licence or your job unless it is illegal. Just my two cents.
    kalevra likes this.
  11. Visit  kalevra profile page
    0
    WOW this thread came back to life!
  12. Visit  kalevra profile page
    0
    Quote from Jeweles26

    Whatever one does outside the hospital should have no effect on your licence or your job unless it is illegal. Just my two cents.
    I agree your personal life or what you do outside the hospital is no ones business. But from what I have experienced on the floor, gossip is the number one activity by 95% of the staff.
  13. Visit  kalevra profile page
    0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    As to how the profession may act: topic was covered (sort of) here: http://allnurses.com/nursing-and-pro...ut-790577.html

    .
    What does the stipulation " Good Moral Standing"

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