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Joined Aug 17, '00. Posts: 4,696 (32% Liked) Likes: 4,810

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  • Jul 3

    This makes me think of the case in NYC in the news,a foster father molested an untold number of children in his care for years.You should not go into fostering with any motive other than caring

  • Jun 11

    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Therefore, I SO disagree that "the other end of the spectrum" is reserved for nurses who were "called" as if divinely or something. There are SUPERB nurses who were not "called" but looking for job security or opportunities for advancement, when they entered. I hate when people believe only nurses "called" to the *profession* (which by definition is NOT synoymous with "calling") are any good.
    We have spoken to this topic many times on this board-and I don't like what the phrase" called to nursing" implies....even though I feel that I was meant to do exactly what I am doing....Too many excellent nurses have settled for low pay and crappy working conditions because they felt that is what they deserve-as if they have to suffer for their "calling" Nursing is a profession and we will never have truly equal pay and benefits until it is recognized as such.....PS=the term "calling" (according to Encarta) has no religious connotation.....but I think many use it in that way..

  • Apr 16

    Quote from cjwensley
    I smell it too, but this last time, the smell has been lingering strongly for 3 days. Could it be me?
    Oh,Lovey-it's not you.It's stuck on you and you need a fresh breeze to blow it off.And a prayer .Smell coffee beans or fresh ground coffee,lavender,peppermint,orange...Or vanilla extract.
    We humans are so dependent upon technology now that we tend to ignore our basic senses,our sense of smell,our intuition.Except for those of us in this field...

  • Apr 16

    Before middle and upper white class kids started dying no-one really much cared.

  • Apr 7

    Quote from anh06005
    And I've never had good experiences with women and inserting catheters. I have only ever actually seen the urethra once (something to get excited about!). Otherwise it's a shot in the dark on a hope and a prayer. And many of these old ladies having hip/back/knee issues doesn't help.

    Did I mention I don't often cath women anyway? Lol
    Try turning them on their side and going in from the back (atrophy has made everything droop, it's often really easy to visualize in that position) or place them on their back on top of a fracture pan turned upside down (juts the pelvis up).Also ask them to cough as you wipe with the betadine-the urethra will "wink" at you. Have plenty of catheters available-if you miss just leave that one in place,it will block something (an instructor gave me that tip ) Now back to topic....

  • Mar 8

    Quote from mjlrn97
    Just had to share this great story from work today.
    ohhh-you made me cry.....

  • Feb 28

    Just skimming and got the shock of my life-I thought the S/P cardiac arrest stood up naked beside the bed.Gave me a start.

  • Feb 15

    I did read the story,I also know that terms such as "fixin' to die" "circling the drain" etc.I also know it is "regional".My point is it makes her sound ignorant.We nurses continue to strive to be recognized as professionals.I would th ok no anyone with even a minimum of education would put their best foot forward during an interview and use proper English.I guess it's my issue.

  • Feb 2

    Back in the day (maybe 8 years ago) our admin use to tell us to avoid using certain words in our documentation because they were "red flags" for the surveyors .We were never to document that a resident was "found" or "dis impacted" Those are the two biggies I remember.We were also threatened with being "written up" which would have been a direct violation of our policies as a verbal warning as the first step. Don't you love being ruled through fear? I'm sure a little inservice would work better...

  • Jan 18

    Before middle and upper white class kids started dying no-one really much cared.

  • Jan 17

    Before middle and upper white class kids started dying no-one really much cared.

  • Jan 2

    We are very liberal with diet and our hospice and palliative care residents.Maybe it's time for your facility to update it's policy and procedures (in her honor) Do some research,write up a proposal,bring it to the admin

  • Dec 27 '16

    Originally posted by Roland
    was admitted to in patient hospice and died about a week later. At the time of her admission her Dr. (and a second opinion) had given her from two to six months to live (she had non small cell lung cancer that had spread to her liver). We decided to take her to Hospice due to the fact we were not able to control her nausea at home, and the hospital could find no physiological cause on a CT scan (such as an impaction). Her pain was under under very good control with BID MS Contin (30mg) and immediate release morphine pid (15mg).

    The very minute she was admitted the nurse said that the Dr. had ordered Haldol for her nausea. I had never heard of Haldol being used in this context, but figured that the Dr. must be aware of some "off label" application of which I was not aware. That night (her first) mom became progressively more agitated and suffered from both visual and auditory hallucinations (she had never before experienced anything like this). Finally, after struggleing to keep her in bed (she kept wanting to get up due to various hallucinations) I called the nurses and they gave her a shot of Atavan and she slept. From that point on Mom took a distinct turn for the worse. Furthermore, the nurses continued to give her more Haldol almost everytime she would even sit up. Two days after admission they performed an enema and this seemed to releave much of her nausea, and she experienced no more emesis. However, the nurses continued to give her Haldol although they did at least admit that it was also being used for agitation in addition to nausea. Mom, was extremely weak by this point not even able to hold her head up (although she pleaded that I place her on a bedside commode rather than suffer the indignity of a foley or diaper).

    I became more concerned after telling my nursing instructor who reacted with alarm at the use of this drug in this context. He said that to his knowledge Haldol was not used for nausea, and espcially not in elderly women on opiates. I confronted the nurses at hospice, and one admitted that Dr. XXXX used the drug to "keep the patients comfortable because most of them were not so fortunate as my mom to have family there twenty four/seven". What galls me is that this was such a beautiful facility with amenities far in excess of any residential care facility that I had ever visitied before. However, there were few if any patients out of there beds to enjoy the facility. My mom died ten days after admission and I feel that she may have been "cheated" of potential quality time with myself and her two year old grandson.

    Is the use of Haldol in this context common at other in patient facilities?
    My condolences on the loss of your mom...I think your anger is a normal part of the grieving process and with time you will heal...It is easy to try to blame in this type of situation..Much easier then bearing the burden of your own helplessness over it......Your family was cheated-by the cancer.....You could not do a thing other then try to give her a comfortable death.....It's areal shame that your nursing instructor offered his opinion in an area not within his expertise and without knowing the details of your mom's condition..He alarmed you needlessly...It's good lesson for us all-he should have offered you nothing but support......We have to be so careful when people ask for advice-see the kind of harm we can cause?

  • Dec 23 '16

    I did read the story,I also know that terms such as "fixin' to die" "circling the drain" etc.I also know it is "regional".My point is it makes her sound ignorant.We nurses continue to strive to be recognized as professionals.I would th ok no anyone with even a minimum of education would put their best foot forward during an interview and use proper English.I guess it's my issue.

  • Dec 23 '16

    I did read the story,I also know that terms such as "fixin' to die" "circling the drain" etc.I also know it is "regional".My point is it makes her sound ignorant.We nurses continue to strive to be recognized as professionals.I would th ok no anyone with even a minimum of education would put their best foot forward during an interview and use proper English.I guess it's my issue.


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