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ICU, RN, BSN, B.S. 4,826 Views

Joined Jun 30, '11. Posts: 209 (23% Liked) Likes: 104

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  • Oct 11 '11

    Quote from NenaRK
    Hello all,


    I'm currently taking my prerequisites for Nursing. I was wondering if a new grad can get hired in the OR? Is there any difference between OR and Perioperative?

    Also, do all hospitals use RNFAs? is that something that you can go to school for? Or would it be better to be a Nurse Practitioner?

    Sorry for all the questions! I'm just really interested in OR Nursing!



    Thanks!

    :redpinkhe

    Hi!! I am a 2 year B.S.N RN in the O.R..love it. I also do PACU and Endoscopy. O.R is part of perioperative nursing. I actually went to take a 3 month perioperative nursing certificate course to help me learn more about this and better my chances of getting into the O.R and it definitely helped! Do you have any colleges or hospitals around you that offer something like this?

    It was great b/c I was able to gain REAL experience scrubbing/circulating in a level 1 Trauma center. Not all hospitals have RNFA's. The only ones that usually do are smaller hospitals that don't have residents. If you're at a big teaching hospital with residents/interns , they are the ones that do the work of the RNFA so there is no need for one. RNFA is also totally different than NP...i've never seen an NP in the O.R.

    What do you want to do? It is very hard for a new grad to get hired in the O.R. b/c they have no experience so I would get your degree, pass the boards, get floor experience for a 1-2 years, and find a place that offers a perioperative training program.

    Hope that helps!!!

  • Oct 10 '11

    OMG.

    I went to the site, and what a bunch of garbage. They don't even mention that the CRNA is a RN with a BSN, Master's, and 1 to several years experience in critical care. The "personal stories" don't say that anyone had a bad experience, just that they were super mom or super daughter for making sure that their family member was attended by a MD. I've had the luxury of working with several CRNAs and those particular CRNAs were much more attentive about returning a call, calling to check on a patient after a surgery, etc. The only surgical med error I ever saw was a MD who didn't check allergies or do a "time out" before they started to put the patient out -- gave the person something they had a known allergy to, and I ended up pushing solumedrol and benedryl like crazy and the person almost ended up intubated. Smooth move, doc.

  • Oct 10 '11

    I hate when people accuse my pursuit to becoming a CRNA as solely dependent on the money. My general reasons.

    1. I love the human body, I love controlling it, altering it, doing everything that I can to help make it better. Becoming a critical part of the surgical team would satisfy this desire.

    2. I love learning. I hate sitting at work everyday knowing that there is a lot that I dont know. I know that my potential has not been reached, I know my understanding of my patients are not complete.

    3. I love being hands on,.. I like seeing the benefit of my intervention. Whether this be titrating sedation and paralytics to get the best abg outcome or giving a real good enema (a really really good one, lol) and providing relief for a patient and preventing obstructions... I just love it!

    4. When I walk into the OR or the SICU,.. it just feels right. I can't explain it.

    5. The higher pay compensation is just a bonus... and it is nice to think that one day my family and I could be less financially stressed. But,.. If you look at my history,.. If you look at all the classes that I've taken and had to pay out of pocket for (thousands of dollars ppl), all the times I come into work unpaid to sit and listen to this educational program or etc,.. the time I spend reviewing research and then presenting it to my fellow employees .. I think you'll see that I do this because I love it not because of the money.

    I think you have to appreciate bedside nursing first, appreciate the person as a whole, be able to help them medically and truly comfort them when they are at their most annoying before you can be entrusted to "give it your all" when they can't complain and you won't be seeing them and their family the next day.

    good luck to everyone!!

  • Oct 10 '11

    Because so many people are going into the field of CRNA due to $$ it irritates me. At first I was hesitant to tell people my ambitions to become a CRNA because many RNs as well as CRNAs place judgement. I am often annoyed by people who claim to want to be a CRNA, however have never shadowed nor fully understand the job.

    I'm not going to lie, CRNA paycheck is nice, however it is definitely EARNED. Thankfully I am up to the challenge So much respect for all the CRNAs out there.

  • Oct 10 '11

    I'm hoping to be a CRNA and it's not for the money. My mom is a retired CRNA and I have never met a person that loved their job more than she did. Growing up, I had the opportunity to be around her practice and see how much her patients (OB type) loved her and colleagues respected her. While she was an advanced practice nurse, and most her job was technical in nature, she always went out of her way to provide the care and comfort of a nurse to her patients and their families. Stressful yes, challenging yes, but worth every minute- so she says.

    I promised her I was never going to be a nurse, went to college got a B.S. in Computer Science, spent some time as a stay at home mom, and through it all decided I wanted to be a nurse. I'm now back in school in an ABSN program, working my rear off to maintain a perfect GPA in hopes of going to anesthesia school, and nothing has ever felt so right.

    And it has nothing to do with the money. I want a technical, challenging career as an advanced practice nurse. The thought of titrating gases, epidurals, and intubations is exciting to me. I understand that their are mundane aspects of the job but those stressful intense moments will surely make up for that. I want the challenge, the autonomy, the stress, the respect all while being a nurse and providing the patient cre that only a nurse can provide. =)

  • Oct 10 '11

    Job Market is fine. Yes very competitive... so anyone who is really only in it for the money either wont get in or will drop out. As long as people know that wanting to be a CRNA and actually getting in are two different scenarios.

  • Oct 10 '11

    It is much easier to find a job as a CRNA as opposed to an RN. There are fewer of us, competition to get into a school is extremely fierce. Competition to get a job after graduation is not that hard. Especially if your willing to move. I have never met a CRNA that took more than 2 or 3 months to get a job. And that was because they took their time before taking their certification test. And the people I know that were told they were no jobs available for them, were only told that just because no job was going to be offered to them (they were extremely difficult to get along with). I have never heard of a CRNA who was truly unemployed.

    Even as a new anesthesia grad with no experience, it isnt the same as being a new RN with no experience. Anesthesia programs train people to provide anesthesia. RN programs train "critical thinking" and the ability to write papers as opposed to actual clinical skills. I know there is a huge variation between programs, but as a whole new RN grads aren't capable of just jumping in and acting completely independant. New CRNA's may not have a huge experience base, but they can jump in without constant hand holding to do their job. They don't need three to six months working with a preceptor before working alone. They don't need additional classes to prepare them. I am not bashing RN's, just stating that new CRNA's are prepared well enough to just jump in and do their job after graduation. Bachelor programs dont prepare new RN's that well for actual clinical practice, its mainly theory. There is a reason new RN's have a harder time getting a job with no experience, alot of extra training and money has to go into a new RN. An experienced RN takes much less effort and money to prepare for a new role. A new RN will take anywhere from 3 to 6 months to prepare to be an independant member. A new CRNA only has to be pointed in the general direction of the OR.

    My ICU orientation after graduation was a total of seven months--one month pure classes, three months working with preceptor daily, and the rest was a kind of probation period where I was watched closely. My first job as a CRNA had an orientation that lasted about five minutes, they just showed me where everything was located.

    The job oppurtunites available are numerous for CRNA's. I kind of got the impression from some of the other posts here that they thought each operating room had 1 CRNA, and implying that there isn't much of demand. Correct me if I am wrong. There is a crna to every operating OR, and every work week may need two CRNA's for every single running OR (working twelve hour shifts will require two crna's to fill just one running OR every single day of a work week). A very small hospital with just four OR's would need at the bare minimum need six CRNA's to cover vacation and the schedule. And that doesnt even take into account the staff needed for offsite anesthesia (endoscopy, etc). A very large hospital would need much more. My hospital has 42 OR's and over 100 crna's. From my experience most hospitals number of CRNA's is almost double the number of OR's they have.

  • Oct 10 '11

    No more pee or poo! Bye bye needy pts driving you crazy for 12hrs. The OR is a pretty cool place to be. I cant see anyreason not to pursue it other than the no working for 28 months and the massive loan incursion thingy...

  • Oct 10 '11

    I've also been shocked at how many others want to be CRNA's. I first went to college for Chemical Engineering and after realizing how awful the paper industry was doing, started working as an EKG tech to explore the health field. Doing that, I got to see what else I would like to do. ED tech, ICU/CCU nurse, and nurse anesthetist (after job shadowing) were the jobs I thought looked great to me. The nurse anesthetist looked ideal to me because it reminded me of my chemical process control class, as well as the very interesting job of a beater engineer at a paper mill - which involves controlling every additive and the mechanical tuning of the machine based on the specs of the paper that you want and what the sensors are picking up at the reel. It was a combination of that with nursing, working with people, which I had learned to prefer over machines (you never have the same day twice!). So it seems like the perfect combination for me. I didn't really think about the money, except that it would help pay the massive loan I'd incur getting there, and the fact that I wouldn't be putting a dime into retirement until my 30's, haha.

    I guess overall, I feel like it's for me, but soooo not for some of the others who want to do it. Although I don't mind the job I do now, which includes a huge amount of excrement and bodily fluids... I am extremely mathematically and scientifically inclined, while I find that the majority of those in nursing school are not (at least not math - biology, yes). I am also a guy, and work with exactly zero male coworkers where I am now - I get along alright, but I picture life being better having other guys around again, in the OR.

  • Oct 10 '11

    Quote from jerrylundergard
    No more pee or poo! Bye bye needy pts driving you crazy for 12hrs. The OR is a pretty cool place to be. I cant see anyreason not to pursue it other than the no working for 28 months and the massive loan incursion thingy...

    No more pee?? you will live by pee. During big operations it will be your job to climb under the OR table making sure not to contaminate anything and MEASURE PEE! intake and output will be critical. You need to know their perfusion status, you need to know their total output,.. are you overloading them, do they have comoridities which would make this even more dangerous (chf), are they in acute renal failure? does it appear that their GFR is sufficient enough to handle the dose of medications that you are giving them? Not all cases will have central lines and CVP and arterial line measurements,.. even long ones. So appreciate pee and get ready to be infering a lot of information about the patient just from their pee.

  • Oct 10 '11

    I knew I wanted to become an anesthesia provider in paramedic school. We would go to the OR to get intubations and I was fascinated by anesthesia. To me it is the coolest thing in medicine.

  • Oct 10 '11

    I guess some have the desires in their heart to be and become an NA to make sure that the hardwork is being paid off such as student loans. We have to remember were not working for charity; were working to get paid for what we love to do.

  • Oct 10 '11

    I guess overall, I feel like it's for me, but soooo not for some of the others who want to do it. Although I don't mind the job I do now, which includes a huge amount of excrement and bodily fluids... I am extremely mathematically and scientifically inclined, while I find that the majority of those in nursing school are not (at least not math - biology, yes). I am also a guy, and work with exactly zero male coworkers where I am now - I get along alright, but I picture life being better having other guys around again, in the OR.[/QUOTE]


    Nice way to boost your ego!

  • Oct 9 '11

    Just seeing what everyone thought of my profile to get into CRNA school for Fall 2012/Spring 2013:

    Experience: 2 years psychiatric (1 year full time, 1 year PRN), 1 Year MICU, Will have 18 months CVICU experience in large teaching hospital by start of program
    GPA: 3.74 in all Undergrad Nursing and Non-nursing Courses
    GRE: Will take September 29, 2011 (new revised test)
    Certs: ACLS, BLS, PALS, will take CCRN in Winter 2011
    Shadowed Surgeon/MDA for a day in Cardiothoracic OR
    Access to good recommendation letters

    Any and all input would be appreciated! Feel free to PM me or post on this thread. Thanks!

  • Sep 25 '11

    i make $44 an hour with about 2 years experience.


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