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Joined Nov 28, '10. Posts: 872 (33% Liked) Likes: 859

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  • Nov 28

    Had a ten year old who was from another country, had been very sick for weeks, now doing better but her poor hair was matted to the core. Her mother had been working on it for days and finally resorted to cutting some of the mats out. She actually had very long hair so you couldnt tell where the cut parts were but she was sobbing and sobbing. Well I had brain surgery a few months prior and they had shaved a few inches off the front of my head, it's a fairly interesting look to say the least so I started showing her my hair, telling her about my surgery and how my hair was growing back but looked really silly for a few weeks. She shooed me away and said "but that is the style in america!" Haha oh I wish, but she made me laugh

  • Nov 19

    Quote from ScoutLeader
    OMG, what was causing this? Do you know?
    I believe they found that he already had an underlying heme disorder (he had his newborn metabolic screen done 4 times because there was something "wrong" with the samples - should have been the first clue). Then he got an infection that totally threw him over the edge, when he came into us he was very critical, docs didn't think he would survive, his MRI before going home showed only a very small stroke too because we initially thought if he survived his brain would be devastated. Although you can never know the true extent of brain damage for a few years, he looked pretty good when he left

    The craziest thing too, his parents said they thought he "looked a little pale" but weren't concerned...this kid was BEYOND a little pale, he was plaster white/gray, like all his blood had been drained out of him, which at that point I guess was pretty accurate haha

  • Nov 19

    1 - in a two month old! Like nothing i've ever seen before, docs did an art stick on him and his blood came out like kool aid. Lab was calling us saying there was something wrong with the sample but it was the baby! Poor thing was trying to correct his body so badly too, his pH was 6.8 and he had a CO2 of 10! Was gasping and retracting like crazy even intubated, eventually had to heavily sedate him to take over his breathing and correct his acidosis, he got more blood products than i've ever seen go into a baby at one time to. And he lived!

  • Nov 17

    1 - in a two month old! Like nothing i've ever seen before, docs did an art stick on him and his blood came out like kool aid. Lab was calling us saying there was something wrong with the sample but it was the baby! Poor thing was trying to correct his body so badly too, his pH was 6.8 and he had a CO2 of 10! Was gasping and retracting like crazy even intubated, eventually had to heavily sedate him to take over his breathing and correct his acidosis, he got more blood products than i've ever seen go into a baby at one time to. And he lived!

  • Nov 17

    1 - in a two month old! Like nothing i've ever seen before, docs did an art stick on him and his blood came out like kool aid. Lab was calling us saying there was something wrong with the sample but it was the baby! Poor thing was trying to correct his body so badly too, his pH was 6.8 and he had a CO2 of 10! Was gasping and retracting like crazy even intubated, eventually had to heavily sedate him to take over his breathing and correct his acidosis, he got more blood products than i've ever seen go into a baby at one time to. And he lived!

  • Nov 17

    1 - in a two month old! Like nothing i've ever seen before, docs did an art stick on him and his blood came out like kool aid. Lab was calling us saying there was something wrong with the sample but it was the baby! Poor thing was trying to correct his body so badly too, his pH was 6.8 and he had a CO2 of 10! Was gasping and retracting like crazy even intubated, eventually had to heavily sedate him to take over his breathing and correct his acidosis, he got more blood products than i've ever seen go into a baby at one time to. And he lived!

  • Oct 23

    I was working in the peds cardiac ICU one day taking care of this kiddo 1 day post op who really wasn't doing to hot. He was acidotic, hypotensive, having respiratory distress, just in general looked bad. We all though he'd be reintubated before lunch. Well it turns out he was not draining from his chest tubes well because the fluid was so thick so the docs on rounds tell me to aggressively milk his chest tubes, which I did roughly every 20 minutes, getting a good amount out.

    After a while of this one of the attendings turns up to check on him, she is definitely one of those "I am holier than thou" types and asks me if she can take a turn milking his tubes which I gladly let her so I could get caught up on other stuff. Well when she realized how much was coming out she proceeded to milk the tubes for an hour and a half straight! Now, really if that is what she wanted, continuous tube milking, I could have done it, but he was obviously improving and the other nurses and I knew that she would keep at it just to be able to tell everyone how she "fixed" him.

    The best part of all this, as she is going on to her colleagues about how amazing her handiwork has been, the kiddos parents turn up, they talk for a few minutes but then, not actually knowing who she is (she was a new attending for them), ask her if she was the charge nurse that day! The look on her face was priceless! And most of us nurses had to walk away for a minute to not crack up at that comment and watch her stutter in shock to tell them who she was.

  • Oct 5

    Had a ten year old who was from another country, had been very sick for weeks, now doing better but her poor hair was matted to the core. Her mother had been working on it for days and finally resorted to cutting some of the mats out. She actually had very long hair so you couldnt tell where the cut parts were but she was sobbing and sobbing. Well I had brain surgery a few months prior and they had shaved a few inches off the front of my head, it's a fairly interesting look to say the least so I started showing her my hair, telling her about my surgery and how my hair was growing back but looked really silly for a few weeks. She shooed me away and said "but that is the style in america!" Haha oh I wish, but she made me laugh

  • Oct 1

    I was working in the peds cardiac ICU one day taking care of this kiddo 1 day post op who really wasn't doing to hot. He was acidotic, hypotensive, having respiratory distress, just in general looked bad. We all though he'd be reintubated before lunch. Well it turns out he was not draining from his chest tubes well because the fluid was so thick so the docs on rounds tell me to aggressively milk his chest tubes, which I did roughly every 20 minutes, getting a good amount out.

    After a while of this one of the attendings turns up to check on him, she is definitely one of those "I am holier than thou" types and asks me if she can take a turn milking his tubes which I gladly let her so I could get caught up on other stuff. Well when she realized how much was coming out she proceeded to milk the tubes for an hour and a half straight! Now, really if that is what she wanted, continuous tube milking, I could have done it, but he was obviously improving and the other nurses and I knew that she would keep at it just to be able to tell everyone how she "fixed" him.

    The best part of all this, as she is going on to her colleagues about how amazing her handiwork has been, the kiddos parents turn up, they talk for a few minutes but then, not actually knowing who she is (she was a new attending for them), ask her if she was the charge nurse that day! The look on her face was priceless! And most of us nurses had to walk away for a minute to not crack up at that comment and watch her stutter in shock to tell them who she was.

  • Sep 26

    I was working in the peds cardiac ICU one day taking care of this kiddo 1 day post op who really wasn't doing to hot. He was acidotic, hypotensive, having respiratory distress, just in general looked bad. We all though he'd be reintubated before lunch. Well it turns out he was not draining from his chest tubes well because the fluid was so thick so the docs on rounds tell me to aggressively milk his chest tubes, which I did roughly every 20 minutes, getting a good amount out.

    After a while of this one of the attendings turns up to check on him, she is definitely one of those "I am holier than thou" types and asks me if she can take a turn milking his tubes which I gladly let her so I could get caught up on other stuff. Well when she realized how much was coming out she proceeded to milk the tubes for an hour and a half straight! Now, really if that is what she wanted, continuous tube milking, I could have done it, but he was obviously improving and the other nurses and I knew that she would keep at it just to be able to tell everyone how she "fixed" him.

    The best part of all this, as she is going on to her colleagues about how amazing her handiwork has been, the kiddos parents turn up, they talk for a few minutes but then, not actually knowing who she is (she was a new attending for them), ask her if she was the charge nurse that day! The look on her face was priceless! And most of us nurses had to walk away for a minute to not crack up at that comment and watch her stutter in shock to tell them who she was.

  • Jul 16

    I am a 24 year old ICU nurse of almost three years. I was recently hospitalized for a brain tumor & crainiotomy to remove it. It was an enlightening experience for me to be the patient, especially for major surgery and an ICU stay. For the most part though nurses didn't treat me any differently, they still explained, comforted and were present for me. The only people who seemed to take my being a nurse for their advantage were the anesthesiologists. They explained things to me in "our" terms prior to surgery but since I seemed relatively calm they didn't give me any sedation prior to going to the OR, in fact I was being strapped down to the table before being given anything either! And no reassuring words or soothing voices from anyone as I was put under, just a mask placed over my face which I can remember fighting a little because I started feeling claustrophobic and unable to breathe, and I remember the anesthesiologist holding it on my face not even looking at me but communicating over me with someone at the foot of my bed. Ugh. That would have to be my only bad experience of my time there. The nurses and other doctors were wonderful and though I only had a 2 day stay after surgery I made sure to go back with a thank you card and goodies for all the nurses.

    I have actually been blogging recently about my experiences, mainly to keep friends and family in the loop. I have a new found interest in spreading awareness about brain tumors, especially because I work in a peds cardiac ICU and have had no experience with anyone with a brain tumor until now.

  • Apr 16

    This past week has been very, very hard for me. A primary patient of mine passed away very suddenly, from a cause no one saw coming. He had been on our unit 2 months but that was short considering the prior 16 months he had spent in three other hospitals. Never once making it home. This was the hospital he was supposed to go home from. On the same day that he died it was the 2nd birthday of my last primary patient who had died (as a baby, it took a long time for me to agree to being a primary again). Emotionally it has been an exhausting week. Couple that with the extreme acuity and high stress of my unit at the moment (daily ECMO cannulations, codes, open heart OR's etc) and we are all exhausted.

    Last night I received a text message though from the mother of my previous primary, the one who would have been two this week. She is having another baby. Hearing that made this week better for me. Knowing that this family, who went through so much and suffered so much, has finally gotten to a place where they can have another child makes me happy, and gives me hope for the family of the little boy I laid in the morgue on Wednesday, that one day they too will be able to heal.

    Sometimes this job s*cks! And it's hard and emotionally draining. But I wouldn't work anywhere else.

  • Apr 16

    This past week has been very, very hard for me. A primary patient of mine passed away very suddenly, from a cause no one saw coming. He had been on our unit 2 months but that was short considering the prior 16 months he had spent in three other hospitals. Never once making it home. This was the hospital he was supposed to go home from. On the same day that he died it was the 2nd birthday of my last primary patient who had died (as a baby, it took a long time for me to agree to being a primary again). Emotionally it has been an exhausting week. Couple that with the extreme acuity and high stress of my unit at the moment (daily ECMO cannulations, codes, open heart OR's etc) and we are all exhausted.

    Last night I received a text message though from the mother of my previous primary, the one who would have been two this week. She is having another baby. Hearing that made this week better for me. Knowing that this family, who went through so much and suffered so much, has finally gotten to a place where they can have another child makes me happy, and gives me hope for the family of the little boy I laid in the morgue on Wednesday, that one day they too will be able to heal.

    Sometimes this job s*cks! And it's hard and emotionally draining. But I wouldn't work anywhere else.

  • Apr 16

    hmm I would have to say we are all jaded.
    Last week I was taking care of my units miracle baby...one of the few I would truly call a miracle. He survived heart surgeries, two times on ecmo and multiple other procedures. He is 13 months old (was hospitalized from 6mos-12mos), he was in for a short visit post a trach change (he had a very special trach). Despite his trach, gtube and medical history he is probably one of the most appropriate 13 mo olds my unit has seen. I was playing with him, throwing him up in the air, parading him around in the wagon. Well the student I had with me seemed absolutely terrified of him! I had to do my other patients assessment and this one would bust out the crocodile tears any time he was left alone so I sent her in there to play with him while I was away and she basically just stood there and looked at him. We forget that most people are not used to these types of patients. To me he was like a day long, fun, babysitting shift but anyone outside our world would not see that.

    I work NICU/Peds CICU and when people outside my nursing friends ask me what I do I don't get into much detail. They can't understand and most don't want to know about the world we live in where children suffer and die.

  • Mar 28

    Loved Mary Anns book but maybe im biased because she was my professor and we went through her review book with her


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