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ThePrincessBride, BSN, RN 38,993 Views

Joined Jun 13, '10 - from 'Somewhere'. She has '1 RN, 3 tech' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Med-Surg, NICU'. Posts: 2,001 (60% Liked) Likes: 5,290

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  • 1:12 pm

    Well what does the N in LPN stand for?

    Of course LPNs are nurses. Anyone who says any differently doesn't know any better.

  • 12:40 pm

    Well what does the N in LPN stand for?

    Of course LPNs are nurses. Anyone who says any differently doesn't know any better.

  • 1:33 am

    Well what does the N in LPN stand for?

    Of course LPNs are nurses. Anyone who says any differently doesn't know any better.

  • 12:25 am

    Well what does the N in LPN stand for?

    Of course LPNs are nurses. Anyone who says any differently doesn't know any better.

  • Dec 8

    Imagine our press ganey scores if this was more widespread.

    There are times I just want to give a patient a shot of whiskey.

  • Dec 8

    Imagine our press ganey scores if this was more widespread.

    There are times I just want to give a patient a shot of whiskey.

  • Dec 7

    Imagine our press ganey scores if this was more widespread.

    There are times I just want to give a patient a shot of whiskey.

  • Dec 7

    Imagine our press ganey scores if this was more widespread.

    There are times I just want to give a patient a shot of whiskey.

  • Dec 7

    Imagine our press ganey scores if this was more widespread.

    There are times I just want to give a patient a shot of whiskey.

  • Dec 7

    Well what does the N in LPN stand for?

    Of course LPNs are nurses. Anyone who says any differently doesn't know any better.

  • Dec 7

    Imagine our press ganey scores if this was more widespread.

    There are times I just want to give a patient a shot of whiskey.

  • Dec 7

    Imagine our press ganey scores if this was more widespread.

    There are times I just want to give a patient a shot of whiskey.

  • Dec 6

    Quote from seraphimid
    Thanks so much for bringing this topic up! I feel the same way, and have been at the receiving end of what feels like animosity from other nurses other professionals in the field when I mention that I plan on specializing in midwifery even though I just started nursing school. Not just on forums but in real life volunteering at hospitals and at school. I would never have applied to nursing school if it wasn't the prerequisite for midwifery. It's seem like in every other profession, this focus on a goal is welcomed and encouraged, whereas in nursing it is interpreted as a lack of commitment or simply carelessness. For instance I doubt students with aspirations to study law get slack for studying philosophy or anthropology.
    I'm not sure about NNP but I know for CNM degrees a lot of schools have changed the requirement for L&D expierence and allow all sorts of nursing experience, even as a doula or CLC. good luck to you and I hope you maintain your aspirations to follow what it is you love and want to do despite discouragement from others.
    In order to become an NNP, one usually needs two full years of neonatal ICU experience in a Level 3 or Level 4 NNP.

    To be honest, I am reaching the one year mark and feel that two years is very lean, depending on the unit. Midwives, in my opinion, SHOULD have a minimum of two years of L/D experience before taking their boards.

  • Dec 5

    OP,

    If you truly wanted to work in the NICU, you would do ANYTHING to get into one, including spending time working with "dreadful" adults/pediatric patients in order to make yourself more desirable to NICU managers.

    Med/surg may not have translated well into my NICU job, but it has certainly made me tougher, more organized and more APPRECIATIVE of the NICU job I have. I work with quite a few nurses who have done nothing but NICU who have a very "princessy" attitude and look their noses down on other specialties, including PP/well-baby RNs. The nurses who have worked in med/surg and other more hardcore areas seem to have a deeper appreciation for the NICU and other specialties in general. Plus they have a broader knowledge base.

    I already gave you advice in your last thread, but you clearly just want to rant and stomp your feet and not pay attention to the BTDT crowd. I was very passionate about getting into NICU and wanted ONLY the NICU. Didn't get it. Cried for about a week. Picked myself back up and applied for other specialties, volunteered for March of Dimes, joined NANN, etc in the meantime to make myself more competitive.

    Eight months into my med/surg job, I accepted a NICU position with another hospital. I will be celebrating my one year anniversary next month.

    While you will be stewing about not getting that dream job out of the gate, other new grads will be getting valuable experience and landing their dream gigs their second or third time around. You, on the other hand, will end up a stale new grad. And there is nothing worse than an old new grad without any experience.

  • Dec 5

    I've talked to a lot of seasoned nurses and they've told me that nursing isn't what it used to be. Once upon a time, nurses were treated with respect, not as waiters/customer service workers. Charting wasn't so onerous and while the work load was heavy, it was doable.

    Now? Many feel that nursing, as a profession, has declined. RN now stands for Refreshments and Narcotics. Reimbursement is heavily tied into patient satisfaction (when it should be tied to OUTCOMES). Wages have remained stagnant, and the proliferation of so many for-profit schools has devalued the nursing degree.

    I have been a nurse for 1.5 years and I see so many people already rushing back to school. Many had no intention of ever working as a floor nurse while others have and decidedly hated it.

    It is scary to see so many incompetent RNs trying to pursue an advanced degree with more liability. Many have very little respect for bedside experience.

    At one point I wanted to go straight through but now that I am getting that experience, I am realizing just how crazy it is to become an NP with little to no experience. However, nights and every other weekends are getting harder and harder and expectations and workloads for nurses are becoming more extreme...I can't see myself working the schedule that I work forever.


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