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ThePrincessBride, BSN, RN 52,302 Views

Joined: Jun 13, '10; Posts: 2,228 (62% Liked) ; Likes: 6,368
Specialty: 3 year(s) of experience in Med-Surg, NICU

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  • Apr 18

    Quote from Nurse Beth
    I completely agree. The proposed legislation calls for 1:3 Tele, 1:4 MedSurg!
    I strongly believe that quality of patient care (in med-surg) declines when a nurse has more than four patients. There is something about having that fifth patient that just throws things off balance. Six is hard, and seven is ridiculously unsafe.

  • Apr 18

    Quote from ICUman
    With all the expenses lost in replacing burnt out nurses, fines for hospital acquired pressure ulcers, medication errors, and everything else listed above, etc., how come hospitals haven't realized reducing nurse to patient ratios will actually *save* the hospital money?

    Is it more expensive really just to hire a few extra nurses? All the hospital scores and safety numbers would rise, including HCAHPS.

    It would be a win-win for everyone. What am I missing?
    You would think so, but these hospitals are too short-sighted.

    And let's be honest, the nurses are not really breaking any budget for what they pay us versus what they charge and receive from the insurance companies.

  • Apr 18

    Amen.

    I work med-surg contingent and one of the reasons I left full-time was because of the unsafe staffing. One night, we had a full house (26 patients), one sitter case, four nurses and one tech (the other had to leave mid-shift). I was left stranded watching a patient while I had seven other patients who needed me. I had to call the house supervisor. I was LIVID.

    Another nurse (who has since left) told me one time (and this was the worst night ever), she had a full house, was charge and there was only one other nurse and aid. You bet that she went to management the next day.

    And then there was the time that one nurse refused to take on a seventh patient and the charge nurse, who already had seven patients himself, had to take an eighth one.

    Needless to say, our patient approval ratings are in the toilet and the turnover is ridiculous. The only reason I bother staying is to keep my skills up, the $$$ and pension and the people. If it weren't for the retirement and coworkers, I would've left already.

  • Apr 13

    Quote from CT Pixie
    I have a good friend who is a new ADN grad (no experience as an RN and none in any aspect of health care) who was hired at $30/hr. 40 hrs a week x 30/hr is $1200/month ($62,400/yr).In order for her to get close to $100,000 she'd have to work 56 hrs a week every week and be getting time and a half for those additional 16 hours. We live in an area of the Country that pays more than most areas for RNs (actually for pretty much any profession) BUT our cost of living is out of control.

    Is it possible? Yes. In certain areas of the country, with overtime. Do you HAVE to have a BSN or higher..no but it would be much easier to get to that $100K mark with it. Do you HAVE to have experience, nope but its tough out there for new grads with no experience to even find a job.
    I think you mean 1200/week, not per month.

    To the OP, yes, it is very possible for a nurse to make that kind of money, but it is difficult if you don't live in a high cost state like California that pays nurses upwards to forty dollars/hr for the norm.

  • Apr 11

    Quote from Nurse Beth
    I completely agree. The proposed legislation calls for 1:3 Tele, 1:4 MedSurg!
    I strongly believe that quality of patient care (in med-surg) declines when a nurse has more than four patients. There is something about having that fifth patient that just throws things off balance. Six is hard, and seven is ridiculously unsafe.

  • Apr 11

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Whoa! Hostile much?

    Racism (and sexism) exist in our society, and I'm sure that they exist in nursing, also. But (strangely like bullying) they don't exist to the extent that many claim they do. In fact, the complaints of racism I've seen are almost exclusively from folks who are trying to get special priveleges that NO ONE else gets. ("They told me I couldn't take an hour for lunch right at noon; they're being racist." "They wouldn't let me take every Sunday off; they're being racist.") Or from folks trying to get out of work.

    I've seen blatant racism from PATIENTS -- but not from my colleagues. North, south, east or west, I've never seen it. And here's a thing -- those folks who are complaining about racism in assignments, breaks, schedules, etc.? Their colleagues of the same race will say that they're "just playing the race card when there's nothing racist about it." It could very well be that there have been a few incidents of racism and I've been totally oblivious.
    I'm sure that is the case. It is hard to see racism when you (general) are not the target. Like I haven't seen anti-Semitism but then again, I'm not Jewish. Doesn't mean it isn't there. I also haven't experienced homophobia or Islamophobia, but I am not gay or Muslim. Doesn't mean such discrimination doesn't exist.

    I get tired of having to defend my experiences against so-called colored-blind people who live in some surreal kumbaya state where racism and every other ism doesn't exist. It does.

    As for wanting special treatment, I don't want that nor would I be comfortable receiving it. I just want to be treated like everyone else and not feel like an island of a person.

  • Apr 9

    I'm rolling my eyes so hard at this post, it hurts.

    My mom had her first at 29 (me), her second at 33 and her last at 36. She could have had more if she wanted.

  • Mar 25

    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Oh, I don't know, New grad RNs make close to $30 here in the Midwest. And I've always been under the impression that the Midwest is smack dab in the middle of what average wages and COL is in the US.
    Huh?

    I live in the mid west. New grads are making close to 23-25/hr. I am a registered nurse with over two years experience and I make less than 26/hr.

  • Mar 21

    Obviously, it is worth it financially and career-wise as RNs have more options than a CNA. After working as a patient sitter, I began working as a nursing assistant making less than 10/hr base. From the jobs I had as a nursing assistant, I never made more than 14-15/hr (including differentials).

    As an RN, between my contingent and FT jobs, I make anywhere from $24.50ish to $45/hr (and that isn't including overtime pay, holiday pay and any bonus/incentive pay that is sometimes offered). I work with newborns in my FT job and find the job isn't that physical, though my feet sometimes get tired from standing up and doing cares all day. My med/surg job, the contingent one, is different, but I don't work there often. It is physical, and I do everything that a tech does. Sometimes, I find myself "missing" a nursing assistant and end up doing most of the work anyway. :/

    With a BSN, I have found that I have more doors open to me and could easily leave bedside nursing in another couple years for something like school nursing, case management, or even pursue an advanced education. I couldn't work as a CNA for life as the wages are absolute garbage and there are some nurses who think they are above doing any "dirty" work.

  • Mar 16

    I'm rolling my eyes so hard at this post, it hurts.

    My mom had her first at 29 (me), her second at 33 and her last at 36. She could have had more if she wanted.

  • Mar 15

    I got stressful just reading your post.

    Unfortunately this isn't uncommon and one of the reasons I won't ever work step foot in ltc/snf again.

    Start looking for a new job...STAT.

  • Mar 14

    Quote from Pixie.RN
    I get it, though — if you live in a place where people have babies much younger, it can feel like time is slipping away at 28. I realize I am also a bit of an oddball, being almost 37 weeks pregnant at 45. But seriously, even though 35+ earns the "advanced maternal age" label, it's just that — a label.

    OP, go see the world! But do it when you have enough nursing experience to walk into a hospital and be functional with computers and patient care with about a day of training under your belt.
    I get it to a certain extent as I live in an area where it isn't uncommon for people to having babies in their early twenties.

    However, if you are hanging around a more educated and career-focused ground, people from that group typically are waiting until their very late twenties to early thirties to have their first baby.

    I am going to be 26 soon and while I still get the sense of urgency to hurry up and get an advanced education before motherhood, I realize that, biologically speaking, I have a minimum of ten good childbearing years left before I need to start "worrying."

    And congrats to your new one! I used to work as a tech in L/D and High risk OB and took care of a 50-year old pregnant with twins. So 45 isn't the oldest yet.

  • Mar 10

    I am looking for another job because the pay and raises at my current employer are so pathetic, it is embarrassing. We are the lowest paying facility, and I doubt it will change anytime soon.

  • Mar 10

    I got stressful just reading your post.

    Unfortunately this isn't uncommon and one of the reasons I won't ever work step foot in ltc/snf again.

    Start looking for a new job...STAT.

  • Mar 4

    In an ideal world where nurses aren't overloaded and management stood behind their nurses instead of playing the blame game, sure. However, rarely do nurses work in ideal environments and management is quick to point the finger at stressed out heavily burdened nurses instead of finding solutions to prevent errors in the first place. I have a feeling if nurses were given more reasonable work loads, there would be less med errors. But we know management won't lower nurse to patient ratios because of the almighty dollar.As for your little bit about integrity...what was so great about firing a nurse for being honest? If a nurse is going to be fired for "acting with integrity" then don't be surprised if he or she doesn't self report. Go ahead and be the high and mighty nurse but don't judge those of us who have mouths to feed and can't afford to lose a job.As long as the nurse intervenes, ensures the patient is safe and unharmed nd learns from the mistake, I see no reason for you to bestow your righteousness on him or her.

    Quote from Davey Do
    One of the questions that goes through my mind when I am considering not self-reporting is "What if somebody else finds my error and I have to justify my inaction?" If I am aware that I made an error, and the error is confronted, I'd have to tell an untruth in order to CMA.I would rather be known as a bumbling Nurse than a Professional without Integrity.Because: "Once you give up integrity, everything else is a piece of cake".


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