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ThePrincessBride, BSN, RN 44,179 Views

Joined Jun 13, '10 - from 'Somewhere'. She has '2 RN, 3 tech' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Med-Surg, NICU'. Posts: 2,136 (61% Liked) Likes: 5,798

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  • Jul 15

    If you work in acute care, be prepared to pay your dues.

    I now work days, but I put in over a year on nights. Some of my coworkers worked less graveyard shifts before going to days. But our unit has high turnover and a lot of people are unhappy. The more desirable places will expect at least two full years of nights before having a chance of switching shifts.

    That being said, I loved nights. I miss the people and the money, and it is usually less crazy. However, I love not sleeping my off days away and having my schedule more conducive to having a relationship and a family.

  • Jul 14

    I judge (not my baby patients, but their parents and the patients on my adult med-surg floor).

    Why?

    Because I'm human.

    Nurses aren't robots. We have feelings and values. The key is to keep our judgments and attitudes to ourselves and to treat our patients with respect.

  • Jul 14

    The problem with many of these new grad nurses is that there are too many poorly-run nursing schools churning out these unprepared nurses who don't know basic skills/knowledge. This is why I am in favor of shutting down these school mills and raising the standards. I know of too many schools that accept any and everyone or have very low qualifications to get in. That is scary, considering how EASY it is for a nurse to accidentally kill a patient.

  • Jul 14

    The second one would be a hands down win if you could move closer to your job.

    Pain clinics sound like hell on earth to work at.

  • Jul 13

    It may not be abnormal or unexpected but it is inappropriate and unsafe.

    I went PRN for that reason. Seven patients...ridiculous.


    Quote from saskrn
    I've worked in various units, in a lot of different hospitals as permanent staff and a traveler, and patient ratios can vary a lot. It also depends what shift you're working.

    I like working nights, and on med/surg floors I've seen anywhere from 3 to 13 patients. But for the most part, an average assignment would be 6 to 8 patients.

    You mentioned that the nurses had 7 patients, and that it felt like too many. IMHO and experience, an assignment with 7 patients on med/surg is not abnormal or unexpected.

    Good luck!

  • Jul 12

    It may not be abnormal or unexpected but it is inappropriate and unsafe.

    I went PRN for that reason. Seven patients...ridiculous.


    Quote from saskrn
    I've worked in various units, in a lot of different hospitals as permanent staff and a traveler, and patient ratios can vary a lot. It also depends what shift you're working.

    I like working nights, and on med/surg floors I've seen anywhere from 3 to 13 patients. But for the most part, an average assignment would be 6 to 8 patients.

    You mentioned that the nurses had 7 patients, and that it felt like too many. IMHO and experience, an assignment with 7 patients on med/surg is not abnormal or unexpected.

    Good luck!

  • Jul 12

    Quote from jprn2018
    I currently work as a CNA in a Med-Surg unit. I am set to graduate as an RN next May. I am just not sure which path I want to take to become an APRN.
    You are putting the cart before horse. Worry about boards and getting your first job first.

  • Jul 12

    What kind of job are you working now?

    OR usually requires an extremely long orientation and no ICU in its right mind will hire a new grad in a part-time or contingent role. CRNA schools require a minimum of one year of full-time ICU experience...part time won't cut it.

    You need to pick and choose.

  • Jul 12

    Quote from jprn2018
    I currently work as a CNA in a Med-Surg unit. I am set to graduate as an RN next May. I am just not sure which path I want to take to become an APRN.
    You are putting the cart before horse. Worry about boards and getting your first job first.

  • Jul 11

    I'm rolling my eyes so hard at this post, it hurts.

    My mom had her first at 29 (me), her second at 33 and her last at 36. She could have had more if she wanted.

  • Jul 11

    No, there is no *law* stating BSNs are the standard of entry for RNs. However, there is a strong "recommendation" from the Institute of Medicine to have 80% of RNs have BSNs by 2020, especially for hospitals seeking magnet status.

    Magnet FAQ's | UC Davis Nursing

    As for LVNs, in my area, LVNs have already been pushed out of acute care for the most part, but that is because the area is saturated with so many RN schools and every hospital in my neck of the woods wants to go magnet. In other places where there is more of a need, LVNs remain strong. Unfortunately, that isn't the case everywhere.

  • Jul 10

    Quote from jprn2018
    I currently work as a CNA in a Med-Surg unit. I am set to graduate as an RN next May. I am just not sure which path I want to take to become an APRN.
    You are putting the cart before horse. Worry about boards and getting your first job first.

  • Jul 9

    I'm rolling my eyes so hard at this post, it hurts.

    My mom had her first at 29 (me), her second at 33 and her last at 36. She could have had more if she wanted.

  • Jul 9

    I'm rolling my eyes so hard at this post, it hurts.

    My mom had her first at 29 (me), her second at 33 and her last at 36. She could have had more if she wanted.

  • Jul 5

    22k is reasonable especially if you work a bit of OT to knock it out sooner. You could wipe out the debt in as little as a year if you wanted.


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