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ThePrincessBride, BSN, RN 45,919 Views

Joined Jun 13, '10 - from 'Somewhere'. She has '2 RN, 3 tech' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Med-Surg, NICU'. Posts: 2,150 (61% Liked) Likes: 5,931

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  • Sep 21

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Ageism is alive and thriving on allnurses.com!

    Seniority is a fair way to decide who gets to go to day shift, have preference in holiday scheduling, float, take mandatory overtime or get that vacation slot that four people have requested. Seniority used in hiring decisions or advancement . . . maybe not so much. However if someone has worked in the system for 20 years, their time of service ought to be worth something, and entitled young ones who want want they want right now and don't want to wait their turn frost me.
    I agree with this up to a certain point. I don't believe seniority should allow people to choose whichever holidays they'll work, or you will have nurses working every major holiday after every major holiday. And the same people shouldn't be constantly mandated. That isn't safe.

    Where I work, the holidays are rotated on a three-year cycle. No exceptions. After a certain number of years, Monday and Fridays are no longer a requirement, as is floating. Mandatory overtime isn't a thing (thank you, baby Jesus!). Everyone has set weekends. Vacation is a first come, first serve. If I ask for PTO months in advance, a more senior person who waits until the last minute should not be allowed to bump me off once my PTO has been approved. That is a recipe for resentment. Now, if a more senior person and I both requested PTO at the same time, then yes, the more senior person should get the vacation approved over me.

    It doesn't have to be an "all or nothing." There needs to be a give and take on BOTH sides.

  • Sep 21

    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    But with my varied and long experience, I likely AM! And therefore, yes, my seniority SHOULD be considered as important. And fortunately, it did when I got my recent promotion. Yes, even if I say so myself, I did deserve it. I worked long and hard for it. I have seen with my own eyes when inexperienced people get promoted too soon, and it's not pretty for anyone, them or their staff. I would take an experienced person over someone without, hands-down, unless they are incompetent, which does happen at times.

    I don't fathom people wanting immediate gratification and not waiting their turn. The longer you are at it, the more likely you will succeed as you climb the corporate ladder. It's just a fact.
    Depends on the type of the experience. If there is an ICU manager position opened, who should get the job...the ICU RN with five years of ICU experience or the more senior nurse with 2 years of ICU experience and 10 years of med-surg? What about the RN who has been at the place less but has been more involved than someone who just has clocked in and out, year after year without taking an active leadership role?

    While I agree that it *usually* the more senior person is the most qualified, it isn't black and white and the Peter principle shouldn't apply in nursing.

  • Sep 21

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Ageism is alive and thriving on allnurses.com!

    Seniority is a fair way to decide who gets to go to day shift, have preference in holiday scheduling, float, take mandatory overtime or get that vacation slot that four people have requested. Seniority used in hiring decisions or advancement . . . maybe not so much. However if someone has worked in the system for 20 years, their time of service ought to be worth something, and entitled young ones who want want they want right now and don't want to wait their turn frost me.
    I agree with this up to a certain point. I don't believe seniority should allow people to choose whichever holidays they'll work, or you will have nurses working every major holiday after every major holiday. And the same people shouldn't be constantly mandated. That isn't safe.

    Where I work, the holidays are rotated on a three-year cycle. No exceptions. After a certain number of years, Monday and Fridays are no longer a requirement, as is floating. Mandatory overtime isn't a thing (thank you, baby Jesus!). Everyone has set weekends. Vacation is a first come, first serve. If I ask for PTO months in advance, a more senior person who waits until the last minute should not be allowed to bump me off once my PTO has been approved. That is a recipe for resentment. Now, if a more senior person and I both requested PTO at the same time, then yes, the more senior person should get the vacation approved over me.

    It doesn't have to be an "all or nothing." There needs to be a give and take on BOTH sides.

  • Sep 19

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Yes, I've been through it, but in reverse. My parents wanted my high school boyfriend to give me an engagement ring for graduation because, in the words of my father as he was driving me to graduation practice, "You'll never make it through college. You might as well just get married and Rob can support you."

    So I moved out of the house the day after high school graduation (and in with my best friend's family), worked hard all summer at two jobs, saved as much as I could and put myself through college. It took me five years to get my BSN, but *I* did it without a dime from my parents. It was difficult, but I did it.

    I got my danged Master's, too!
    Wow...your dad sounds like a winner.

    Who does that?!?

  • Sep 19

    Well what does the N in LPN stand for?

    Of course LPNs are nurses. Anyone who says any differently doesn't know any better.

  • Sep 16

    A billionaire heiress.

    Or a worldwide best-selling author.

    Or Christian Bale's baby mama

  • Sep 11

    Well what does the N in LPN stand for?

    Of course LPNs are nurses. Anyone who says any differently doesn't know any better.

  • Sep 11

    Quote from Tetra
    No, I'm saying people should get service, they just should also be billed for it. I've already stated there are exceptions within the OP.

    Technically for me to be a hypocrite, I'd have to not pay into the system I'm in. If you read the thread, you'll see I have said several times that I do. As to your comment though, I've been fortunate to have had zero health issues.
    And what happens if they cannot pay?

    And no, you still would be considered a hypocrite as you didn't pay 100% for you and yours, even though you've "paid into the system."

  • Sep 11

    So what you are saying is that we should let poor people, children/babies, disabled people and elderly people die on the streets because they weren't born with a silver spoon in their mouths? Am I am hearing this correctly?

    My boyfriend (a Libertarian) and I (liberal) have gotten into arguments over this. I think that healthcare IS a human right. No one should be denied access to healthcare because they are of a lower SES.

    I sure hope that YOU have paid for EVERY bit of healthcare for you and yours, OP. Anything else would make you an ugly hypocrite.

  • Sep 10

    A billionaire heiress.

    Or a worldwide best-selling author.

    Or Christian Bale's baby mama

  • Sep 9

    No. It isn't.

    NPs were expected to have years and years of bedside experience prior to moving on to advance practice. RN knowledge AND experience are the foundations of NP practice. You cannot "divorce" NURSE practitioners/advanced practicing REGISTERED NURSES from the field of nursing. That is asinine.

    Lowering the standards just because it is trendy for pre-pre-nursing students to declare their goal of being NPs without ever setting foot on the floor as a nurse is just asking for trouble. LIVES are at stake. NPs are responsible for diagnosing, prescribing and formulating treatment plans. One small error can KILL someone.

    If anything, we need to demand more. We should expect advanced RNs to, you know, have the basics down before trying to become providers.

    But, in the end, it is all about the almighty dollar. Those schools don't give a crap about producing sharp, knowledgeable, safe and competent providers who can hold their own against the better prepared MDs and PAs. They care about getting money. The best way to do this is to lower the standards and let even the student with a 2.3, zero RN experience who flunk the NCLEX six times matriculate.

  • Sep 9

    No. It isn't.

    NPs were expected to have years and years of bedside experience prior to moving on to advance practice. RN knowledge AND experience are the foundations of NP practice. You cannot "divorce" NURSE practitioners/advanced practicing REGISTERED NURSES from the field of nursing. That is asinine.

    Lowering the standards just because it is trendy for pre-pre-nursing students to declare their goal of being NPs without ever setting foot on the floor as a nurse is just asking for trouble. LIVES are at stake. NPs are responsible for diagnosing, prescribing and formulating treatment plans. One small error can KILL someone.

    If anything, we need to demand more. We should expect advanced RNs to, you know, have the basics down before trying to become providers.

    But, in the end, it is all about the almighty dollar. Those schools don't give a crap about producing sharp, knowledgeable, safe and competent providers who can hold their own against the better prepared MDs and PAs. They care about getting money. The best way to do this is to lower the standards and let even the student with a 2.3, zero RN experience who flunk the NCLEX six times matriculate.

  • Sep 8

    Job hopping in itself isn't that big of deal if it isn't done repeatedly. I started off at a SNF left after a couple weeks and only three days on orientation. Did not even receive a paycheck, so I didn't count it and it isn't on my resume.

    Then I got a job on a med/surg unit. Stayed there for eight months before cutting down to PRN in order to start my dream job in NICU. I have been at it for almost eighteen months and plan to stay another year before finding another job with better benefits.

    I am getting bored and find myself unchallenged. I love my babies, but it is very repetitive. I dream of other specialties, particularly cardiac step-down/ICU or going back to school for NP.

    But job-hopping really isn't good for career development long term. You never did get pass the new grad phase as a RN and you seem all over the place. Eventually, you will be blackballed out of your current market and be forced to stay put for awhile.

    Ask yourself what it is you want in a job and what you are willing to put up with in order to get it.

  • Sep 8

    You know...I have come to the conclusion that there are nasty little turds in every profession. Nursing is no different.

    I am now starting a new job and when I went to the unit the first time, I did get a clique vibe among the nurses. I am hoping my first impressions are wrong, but if they aren't, I am just going to focus on what I am there for: to make money and to care for the babies (and their families).

    To hell with the mean, catty co-workers. Allow yourself to vent in private to your husband for a couple minutes but then let it go. I know it is easier said than done.

  • Sep 8

    No. It isn't.

    NPs were expected to have years and years of bedside experience prior to moving on to advance practice. RN knowledge AND experience are the foundations of NP practice. You cannot "divorce" NURSE practitioners/advanced practicing REGISTERED NURSES from the field of nursing. That is asinine.

    Lowering the standards just because it is trendy for pre-pre-nursing students to declare their goal of being NPs without ever setting foot on the floor as a nurse is just asking for trouble. LIVES are at stake. NPs are responsible for diagnosing, prescribing and formulating treatment plans. One small error can KILL someone.

    If anything, we need to demand more. We should expect advanced RNs to, you know, have the basics down before trying to become providers.

    But, in the end, it is all about the almighty dollar. Those schools don't give a crap about producing sharp, knowledgeable, safe and competent providers who can hold their own against the better prepared MDs and PAs. They care about getting money. The best way to do this is to lower the standards and let even the student with a 2.3, zero RN experience who flunk the NCLEX six times matriculate.


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