Content That Kooky Korky Likes

Content That Kooky Korky Likes

Kooky Korky 13,036 Views

Joined Feb 12, '10. Posts: 2,435 (50% Liked) Likes: 3,031

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  • 4:28 am

    They need a boot camp for management. No breaks, unreasonable patients and family members, ridiculous mandatory charting, 5 call lights going off at once, monitor alarms and bed alarms screeching as well.

  • Jun 25

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    I disagree. Girls get pink, boys get blue. Generally speaking.
    Of course, you have yet to define "social construct".
    You do realize that there are many subsets of a society, don't you?
    And these subsets view and do things differently.
    So what's the biological tie to pink for girls and blue for boys? A social construct is an idea or notion that appears to be natural and obvious to people who accept it but may or may not represent reality, so it remains largely an invention or artifice of a given society. When talking about how people are socialized, it has nothing to do with the biology but the interpretation of the biology.

  • Jun 25

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    I disagree. Girls get pink, boys get blue. Generally speaking.
    Of course, you have yet to define "social construct".
    You do realize that there are many subsets of a society, don't you?
    And these subsets view and do things differently.
    This is a social construct. Boys are not genetically predisposed to like blue. Society dictates that boys = blue. And so it happens.

  • Jun 25

    Tea Consent - YouTube - again. It's 2 minutes and well worth the watch.

  • Jun 25

    Quote from lifelearningrn
    Okay, it was CLEARLY a poor analogy. A river is natural. A river flooding its banks is a natural force of nature. Comparing rape to a river is like saying rape is a natural reaction of man.
    you are stretching. please note that i am behind the stanford victim, not the perp. If you choose to be that purposefully misunderstanding there is nothing i can do for you.

  • Jun 24

    When my mom was in LTC, I visited her every day. I saw the situation you are describing. It was a large congregate care ALF. The nurses and CNAs there were very good, but constantly short handed. One day the A/C failed in the large dining room. This was in Tampa, FL in the summer and the temperature shot up quickly. The director of the facility gave orders NOT to move residents to their air conditioned rooms to finish their meals, so I personally moved my mom and her friends out of the sweltering dining room. The staff followed my lead and soon all the residents were moved to their rooms to finish dinner. The facility had NO ICE for drinks, so I ran to buy ice. I felt so bad for the nursing staff because they were so short handed and management either had no clue or did not care. After that, I moved my mom to a small 5 resident ALF in my neighborhood. The smaller ALF was clean, friendly, had wonderful food and a CNA to resident ratio of 1 to 5. I understand how hard it can be at the large facilities and am saying a prayer for you. Maybe having the time off during the week you'll have time to recharge and maybe look for a higher quality facility? Hugs and thank you for all you do - people such as myself appreciate your care and hard work. Good luck.

  • Jun 24

    I worked LTC for two years, 3-11 shift.
    1. Stop comparing yourself to other nurses and how fast they are. It is not a measure of how good a nurse that you are. I was never faster than other nurses, even after 2 years. I was always working right up until 11 pm, while they were sitting at the nurses station on Facebook. I took comfort that when i went home, I knew that I didn't fake VS and BS and yes I believe you when you say that is happening. I gave all meds that were scheduled and asked residents about their pain regarding prn meds.
    2. Try to get organized even if you are eager to start passing meds! Before you start your med pass, see what treatments you will be giving, who has Foleys that need to be monitored, who needs vitals and accucheks, etc. I liked to start at one end of the hallway and work my way down room by room, I would skip residents who weren't in the room and then try to catch them later.

    Good luck! You will get faster.

  • Jun 24

    Wow you meant to tell me that your debility has a designated admit Nurse and your having to do all this ? There's a problem right there. I'm an LTC Nurse/LPN and I can tell you that I've done at least 40 full admits when I worked evening shift.

    I've gotten admits from the local hospital, from there home, and in some circumstances such as yours, other nursing home facilities. It's just not gonna fly with me if a patient arrives with a sack full of medicine. No no. Very unprofessional and just down right lazy.

    I would have called the nursing home they came from and asked for a copy of there current MAR or POs (preferably updated MAR). If the patient was coming to the facility under the services of the same physician I would have transcribed all the orders to my facility according to policy because nothing is changing but scenery here. Same doc same orders. Just slap those puppies in and log the meds in Narcs included.

    Even if they were coming to the facility under a different physician our policy still tells us to copy orders from the previous facility and new MD will review and make changes on rounds. But personally I wouldn't just leave a new admit in the facility with no orders or anything like that. You can always call your DON/ADON nursing supervisor for advice in situations like these.

    Admits are very lengthy and require one heck of an effort by a floor nurse to complete. Good luck to you I feel your pain.

  • Jun 24

    Quote from Sagegrr
    Some nurses are very disrespectful to students, they see us as extra work. I would take this as a lesson to not be like them in the future. Granted I understand why they were mad at us, our clinical instructor sat in the break room the whole entire time.
    You are extra work, no matter what you think. Even if you assess the patient, pass meds, do treatment, I, as the primary nurse, still have to assess my patients (I don't have 1, I have 5 to 6), make sure all meds were given, reassess as necessary make sure treatment was done correctly, etc. I also have to go behind you and make sure charting is done properly. I have to make sure all this is done because I am ultimately responsible for that patient, not the student. If something happens to my patient, because of something that was missed by a student, it's not the student who gets to appear before risk, it's the nurse.

    I love teaching. I don't mind precepting, teaching, orienting, etc. I am going back to school to become a nursing instructor. No matter how much I love teaching though, it doesn't change the fact that students do increase the workload.
    None of this is said to be disrespectful, it's just a fact.

  • Jun 24

    Quote from ixchel
    I disagree with only one thing - the STUDENT is the most responsible for their own learning.
    I agree to a point. While it is the student that is the most responsible to ensure that they get what they need to succeed it is also the instructors responsibility to teach the students the necessary material.

    Students pay a lot of money for their education. They should be able to say to say with some confidence that they got their money's worth at the end.

  • Jun 23

    I'd have lost my job because if ANYONE, including doctors, called me or anyone I worked with "monkeys" I'd have gone ape-sh*t on his a$$. The last time a doctor was anywhere near that inappropriate I has his butt pulled into the Chief of Staff's office and his privileges were suspended for 10 days.

  • Jun 22

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    You are not calling to report a missing chair alarm. You know I didn't say to do that. You are calling to say you cannot get the pt up as ordered, as there are no chair alarms available, per Charge Nurse. Might you be in trouble for sharing the dirty little secret? Yeah. But I'll bet some alarms would magically appear - rapidito!

    I am so sick of nurses afraid to speak up, I am sick of nurses letting employers step all over them.
    The only thing she should have done differently is to have notified MD that no alarms were available.

    Actually that is exactly what you said, if I misunderstood then ok. To be clear any phone call to a doctor saying that I cannot follow your order because I cannot find the equipment would have the same result. They MIGHT call my charge nurse and go off on her which is no better for me. I don't get stepped on because as I said previously, I would never allow myself to be blamed for something that occured after report/narc count.

  • Jun 22

    I say get out of there! I quit working for a place many years ago because I gave report on a patient group, and as I was giving report on the last one, one of the others decided to climb over the bed rails. In view of the day nurse!

    The day nurse demanded that i: fill out the incident report, get the patient assessed and back in bed, and since during my assessment I noted sat of 60....I called the rapid response team. Suddenly I was staying over 4 hours documenting all that mess too. They ended up going to the ICU and guess who had to transport them?

    I got in trouble because I stayed over, because I filled out the incident report, and because I called the rapid response team. Oh, and because I had the NERVE to ask the house supervisor to get me help transporting the patient. Never mind that day shift refused to help saying it wasnt their patient, so they didnt need to help with the transport.

    Yep....I got out fast! That place had the talking out of both sides of their mouth going on....because we kept being told to utilize the rapid response team, but every time we did (always legitimate reasons), they found something to write us up about.

    My friend just got wrote up about a dead transfer from the ER. She went into the room as the ER attendant left and the patient was still sitting up in their wheelchair from home. Patient was stone cold dead. I don't know the whole story yet, but somehow she was supposed to have avoided calling a Code Blue. Not her fault they arrived dead already!

  • Jun 22

    I don't work in your specialty but I've had rough patches in my career. Hating my job was one... You need to adjust your attitude. I don't mean you have a bad attitude, but you need to look at your job in a different way. Since what you are doing isn't working for you, do something different. I started to focus on my own internal compass of what I felt was a good day, not what I was receiving from my dysfunctional workplace. My problem was management, not the patients, but it took me a long time to readjust so I could at least, not hate going to work. Every job has its ups and downs so this skill will serve you well over your career. Look for makes you feel good at work and focus on that. If there is truly nothing, ask yourself what would be different in a different environment. Sometimes leaving is the best choice, but not the only one. I hope that helps...

  • Jun 22

    I am an ally, and these events have made me heartsick. Praying for healing for the wounded and comfort for the families and friends of the dead.


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