Content That Kooky Korky Likes

Content That Kooky Korky Likes

Kooky Korky 12,426 Views

Joined Feb 12, '10. Posts: 2,331 (51% Liked) Likes: 2,950

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  • May 29

    Document every little detail of what's happening in a personal notebook. You never know when detailed information about issues may come in handy. Nothing will get a bully to back off like someone whipping out a notebook and giving specific dates, times and details.

  • May 28

    They do that a lot at the psych hospital I work for. Psych seems to be a constant revolving door of employees. I've worked a lot as the med nurse (Lpn job) and behavior health aid depending on the cycle. Since we are strictly psych and not medical, these people can generally take care of themselves. So BHAs take turn watching monitors, doing 15 minute rounds, and just interacting with patients. I usual enjoy the time not being the one in charge. But some nurses I work for think it is beneath them. To me, I get paid the same regardless if I'm working as bha, med nurse, or RN.

  • May 28

    Yes, this can be done. I actually volunteer for it if I know we're short CNAs. Comparatively easy money, plus I find I do a MUCH more thorough assessment when I have my own total care patients. I do not see this venom you speak of.

  • May 28

    Quote from hillbillienurse
    I did not present my question as a complaint, but as a question. I wrote the question for a friend. Now that the bad attitude bunch has squealed and shaken a crooked finger, I will wait and be appreciative of answers that aren't laden with venom from elsewhere.
    What "venom"? You asked a question and a few different people have answered. I don't read anything negative or critical in the responses. Yes, an RN can be assigned to work as a CNA. Most of us have had that experience over the years at one time or another. I've never minded it particularly; I was getting paid my usual wages for what was usually a much easier shift.

  • May 27

    My honest feedback? Mind your own business on this one

  • May 27

    Sounds like you did everything you could. Nurse's like the one you described are nearly impossible to please. Nursing is 24/7. You did your job and Now Its time for her to do hers. Hang in there nursing can be tough.

  • May 26

    It is hard when you are the nurse and your LO is in the hospital.
    When my husband was in the hospital a couple of years ago I stayed out of most things but did speak up a couple of times. It was received as "so and so".
    When my son broke his arm after a bike accident I had to take him into the city and the hospital, while a huge reputation, was horrible in my opinion. I spoke up several times there and did not trust that dept at all. A new NP who had her first day tried to tell me some weird stuff and I insisted on talking to the MD.
    My daughter has chronic issues (which are much better now) but back then it was really rough. Not all providers appreciated my "expertise". I am usually laid back with my children's health but if there is something not ok or I doubt it I will speak up.

  • May 26

    When my dearly missed husband was in hospital, there was no hiding it as I worked in the same place. It got to the point of when I would bring him in, my doc would just hand me the order page (before EMRs) and have me write out the routine orders and meds since I did all his tube feeds, suction & meds at home most of the time; then they would add in whatever he needed for that particular visit.

  • May 26

    I'm in that situation now, literally. I try not to let on that I'm a nurse because the medical staff assume that I know more than I do. I ask a lot of questions, and let people do their jobs.

  • May 26

    Maybe be a hospital receptionist? Or activity director at a SNF? Or go back to school to become an LPN?

  • May 25

    You can still turn this around, but it is going to require an extreme makeover.

    You are now viewed as negative, so to change that opinion you have to be more positive, more cheerful, more helpful than anyone else. You have to be a ray of sunshine all the time.

    Never vent to anyone you work with. If you need to vent call EAP, talk to a counselor/minister/priest, post on AN. Tell everyone else how much you love your job.

    Smile ALL the time.

    No matter what your manager/another employee requests, answer "I'd be happy to."

    No matter how frustrated or stressed you are, do not let it show.

    Never ask not to have a certain unit or patient. You are "happy to do anything the organization needs."

    Smile at the patients. Talk kindly to them. Have time for them. Talk kindly about the patients to other nurses.

    I know this sounds extreme, but once you have a reputation, it takes extreme changes to turn that around.

    The facility exists to provide care to patients. If they think you might cause them to lose business, they are going to lose you instead.

    Organizations don't want negative employees, because negativity is contagious. A single negative employee can make all the employees unhappy.

    Even with all these changes, you probably should start job hunting. You can turn this around, but even 1 more complaint about you might be the last straw.

  • May 25

    She's done. They found out why they couldn't manage a closed reduction. When they opened it, her bone had poked through the periosteum and it was wrapped around the bone. Two pins in that they will remove in 4 weeks and she will stay overnight for 3 doses of IV ABT.

    They're doing a pain block now and then I'll get to see her.

    Thanks for all the good thoughts and love!! [emoji173]️[emoji173]️

  • May 25

    OW!!! praying for her. and for you. It's so hard to see our kids in pain, and just as hard to see them taken into surgery.

  • May 25

    Remind her that after she comes home from surgery, it is the perfect time to look real pitiful and ask for stuff she normally wouldn't get...from grandparents, aunts, uncles, Stud Muffin, etc.

  • May 25

    One thing to consider with clinics and some procedural areas... You don't necessarily clock out and leave at 5pm. These areas can run late some days, and the nurses leave after the last case is done or the last patient seen.
    A parent needs childcare, back up childcare and emergency backup childcare. And the childcare needs to have some flexibility for the days when things run late.
    You can apply for day positions, but most available shifts will be nights or rotating shifts.


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