Latest Likes For Kooky Korky

Latest Likes For Kooky Korky

Kooky Korky 14,350 Views

Joined Feb 12, '10. Posts: 2,531 (51% Liked) Likes: 3,208

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  • Aug 27

    People "that" do whatever, instead of people "who" do whatever.

  • Aug 27

    Quote from SunnyPupRN

    This is criminal. And I mean the judge. What do you think?

    Article Credit: Huffington Post

    An Arkansas Judge Sent A Cancer Patient To ‘Debtors’ Prison’ Over A Few Bounced Checks

    The court system in the town of Sherwood is destroying the lives of poor people, a new federal lawsuit alleges.


    08/24/2016 05:52 pm ET
    Ryan J. Reilly



    An Arkansas Judge Sent A Cancer Patient To 'Debtors' Prison' Over A Few Bounced Checks
    I hope the bailiffs get locked up along with the judge and whoever else is responsible for forcing people to waive their rights and for "closing" this public court. This has go to be completely unconstitutional.

  • Aug 26

    Quote from Jedrnurse
    And what are your thoughts about "all y'all"?
    I love it.

    Him and me did whatever. No. He and I did whatever.

    Or she and he did but her and him did not.

  • Aug 26

    Quote from Jedrnurse
    And what are your thoughts about "all y'all"?
    I love it.

    Him and me did whatever. No. He and I did whatever.

    Or she and he did but her and him did not.

  • Aug 26

    OP's apparent irritation with early arrivals is understandable if they get in the way of her finishing her shift. Like if they tie up a computer and she can't get her work done because of that.

    It used to irk me when the oncoming nurse would arrive about 15 minutes early and start crowding me off of the med cart. She would actually complain if the cups hadn't been restocked or trash hadn't been emptied yet. I had to let her know that I would be taking care of these things before I left. She would slam drawers and complain and run to the Supervisor, who sometimes came to talk to me.

    I would point out that this nurse had arrived early and needed to let me finish my work. Supervisor sometimes admonished me, which shows how screwed up the situation was. When I would remind her that my shift wasn't over, she would be, I think, so rattled by this other nurse that she took her side just to calm her down and get her to hush her mouth. It was aggravating and demoralizing to me. And this was before HIPAA and computerized everything, so that wasn't the issue. I started to intentionally not leave a clean, restocked cart intentionally, since my good intentions and actions didn't make any difference. How did this end? I became a Supervisor.

    In another situation, we were ordered to not work OT. If we were going to be late getting off, we were to get permission from the House Supervisor. Sometimes Sup would gladly approve, sometimes she'd complain. I got tired of it, so learned to leave things undone if it meant I'd be late getting off. For instance, I figured the aides could answer lights because they could not do my meds and charting or Charge duties.

    This largely comes down to proper workloads and staffing.

    ER used to demand that we stop getting Report when we first arrived and take Report from them instead, so they could clear out the ER at shift change. Our boss backed them up and we were caught in the middle. Fortunately, we went to taping Report, so we could get it any time. None of the nurses I worked with on my shift were militant, only me. I soon learned to chill, as caring a whole lot did no good. These types of things tend to take the steam out of your sails and turn enthusiastic nurses into sadder but wiser, mediocre nurses. You can't swim upstream forever. Much easier to float.

    Working off of the clock carries liability, like not being covered by Workers' Comp or maybe even by your private insurer; maybe other issues involved, too.

    As for promoting the profession, I applaud you, OP.

  • Aug 26

    Quote from Lev <3
    What a great discussion! The things everyone mentioned is what I feared, that nurses are just too busy to fill out another checklist and we just need to hire more staff. Unfortunately, hiring more staff is less likely to happen than more things for us to document. Some people have mentioned that the nurses assessment is more important than vital signs and even the vital signs alone don't mean something is wrong. For example, with baseline bradycardia or hypotension. The tool incorporates that. I made up the tool sort of like an algorithm. It is pretty complex but could take 10 minutes to fill out once someone is used to filling it out. However, some other form of "petty" documentation would have to removed before another form of documentation is added. I will post the tool when I am not typing on the phone.

    Not being rude, but you are on the Council, not the Counsel. Just sayin'.

    Sounds like you are sold on this new form/task.

  • Aug 26

    OP's apparent irritation with early arrivals is understandable if they get in the way of her finishing her shift. Like if they tie up a computer and she can't get her work done because of that.

    It used to irk me when the oncoming nurse would arrive about 15 minutes early and start crowding me off of the med cart. She would actually complain if the cups hadn't been restocked or trash hadn't been emptied yet. I had to let her know that I would be taking care of these things before I left. She would slam drawers and complain and run to the Supervisor, who sometimes came to talk to me.

    I would point out that this nurse had arrived early and needed to let me finish my work. Supervisor sometimes admonished me, which shows how screwed up the situation was. When I would remind her that my shift wasn't over, she would be, I think, so rattled by this other nurse that she took her side just to calm her down and get her to hush her mouth. It was aggravating and demoralizing to me. And this was before HIPAA and computerized everything, so that wasn't the issue. I started to intentionally not leave a clean, restocked cart intentionally, since my good intentions and actions didn't make any difference. How did this end? I became a Supervisor.

    In another situation, we were ordered to not work OT. If we were going to be late getting off, we were to get permission from the House Supervisor. Sometimes Sup would gladly approve, sometimes she'd complain. I got tired of it, so learned to leave things undone if it meant I'd be late getting off. For instance, I figured the aides could answer lights because they could not do my meds and charting or Charge duties.

    This largely comes down to proper workloads and staffing.

    ER used to demand that we stop getting Report when we first arrived and take Report from them instead, so they could clear out the ER at shift change. Our boss backed them up and we were caught in the middle. Fortunately, we went to taping Report, so we could get it any time. None of the nurses I worked with on my shift were militant, only me. I soon learned to chill, as caring a whole lot did no good. These types of things tend to take the steam out of your sails and turn enthusiastic nurses into sadder but wiser, mediocre nurses. You can't swim upstream forever. Much easier to float.

    Working off of the clock carries liability, like not being covered by Workers' Comp or maybe even by your private insurer; maybe other issues involved, too.

    As for promoting the profession, I applaud you, OP.

  • Aug 24

    Volunteer at the Humane Society. Believe me, I am so blessed by holding scared or lonely or restless dogs and cats. It is a true joy to be able to give them food and water and clean bedding and just make their world a little less scary or lonely.

    Give money to beggars.

    Help in Sunday School, donate funds to church, pray.

    Wish I could do more.

  • Aug 23

    Volunteer at the Humane Society. Believe me, I am so blessed by holding scared or lonely or restless dogs and cats. It is a true joy to be able to give them food and water and clean bedding and just make their world a little less scary or lonely.

    Give money to beggars.

    Help in Sunday School, donate funds to church, pray.

    Wish I could do more.

  • Aug 23

    Quote from Mountain Nurse
    Well, I am a CNA and I used to work in a LTC facility. We had a man, who was maybe sixty. He had had a quadruple bypass surgery, and had came in on my 3-11 shift. The other aide I was working with went in to check him, and came back out as wide eyed as an owl. She said that mr so and so had a, had a, and then whispered to me that he had an erection. She weighed about 265 lbs, at least, but was convinced that it was her and refused to go back in. Later, we found out that he had ED and his propriopism was permanant. Wasnt the aide after all!!
    Some gents like a good-sized gal. Something to hold onto.

  • Aug 23

    Quote from A2steele
    I indicated agency issue because had I been a staff nurse, my voiced concerns or complaints wouldn't have resulted in me being a DNR. I am expected to perform to the standards of any other professional nurse and I do so. I have a right just as any other nurse to voice my concerns and not be reprimanded. I care not to return to that hospital but that doesn't solve the problem.
    A staff nurse might still get canned. Most employers can make staff disappear with enough documentation, lies, exaggerations, misinterpretations, or even the truth - whatever it takes.

    This is a painful lesson, but a valuable one. Next time, no matter what, no complaining. Surely you could get one of the staff to get you into the Pyxis so you could give pain meds.

    And never mind what the staff are doing, like sitting and talking about personal stuff. It really is not your concern. Not saying it's right or that it isn't galling - only that there is no good that can come from you focusing on it.

    Why do you work agency?

  • Aug 19

    Quote from Been there,done that
    HRC has no respect for ANYTHING other than herself and her goal to be the first vagina to be POTUS. She views nurses as a dime a dozen.

    She will most likely change her tune.. when one of us stand between her .. and life and death.
    I doubt she will, BTDT, because it will be just that nurse's luck that HRC''s loved one will die or get sicker.

    I remember she said it, too. I think her MIL was a CRNA, wasn't she?

  • Aug 15

    Quote from Elvish
    I think this is the classic case of a family that argues over each other before realizing that everyone essentially agrees.

    OF COURSE monitors can be good. But if I started bagging every newborn baby whose pulse was 74 via pulse ox I would a) be wasting a lot of equipment and b) hurting a lot of babies. Because the baby's pulse is actually 148 (perfectly fine for a newborn) but because the pulse oximeter is a machine that picks up a certain wave amplitude as a pulse, and newborn radial pulses (where we measure preductal sats) aren't always at an amplitude that the oximeter can read unless your placement is perfect all the time. A newborn who's pink, alert, and has excellent tone is unlikely to actually have a pulse of 74.

    If we freaked out and sectioned every patient whose FHR apparently drops to the 70s on the EFM (continuous EFM being another discussion altogther), we'd be wasting a lot of money and cutting a lot of people for no reason. Because a lot of times that pulse in the 70s is mom's pulse, not baby's.

    I'd say I treat the patient and not the monitor way more often than the other way around.

    I worked with a cardiologist in Central America who could listen to a heart and diagnose the patient exactly. The echo was essentially to confirm what he already knew. He's been a cardiologist for 50+ years and spent 30+ years working in the developing world, so he has seen plenty of stuff. He manages and treats people who should not be walking around alive, and he does it mostly without monitors. He is from that old breed of clinicians who rely on their five senses to do the majority of diagnosing. I would trust him with my life or any of my kids' lives every day of the week.
    There is way too little physical exam these days.

  • Aug 14

    Show your enthusiasm at school as you have shown her, but don't gush.

    Be nice but not overly nice.

    Study and learn what you are supposed to learn.

    Be courteous but not a pushover.

    Don't gossip or make fun of anyone.

    Silence can be golden.

    Use basic good judgment.

    Here's wishing you great success and lots of joy in your new endeavor.

  • Aug 14

    Show your enthusiasm at school as you have shown her, but don't gush.

    Be nice but not overly nice.

    Study and learn what you are supposed to learn.

    Be courteous but not a pushover.

    Don't gossip or make fun of anyone.

    Silence can be golden.

    Use basic good judgment.

    Here's wishing you great success and lots of joy in your new endeavor.


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