Content That Been there,done that Likes

Content That Been there,done that Likes

Been there,done that 25,933 Views

Joined Aug 4, '09. Posts: 4,305 (71% Liked) Likes: 14,867

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  • May 26

    Quote from missourinurse2b
    Not that much physical effort as a CNA??? Have you worked as a CNA, because I have and it certainly isn't easy!
    I know! Maybe if you're a CNA in the Twilight Zone or something like that...

  • May 26

    Quote from KatieMI
    Tele tech, phlebotomist or unit clerk, to begin with. Not that much physical effort as CNA, sometimes can be trained on the job and pays not much but still more than minimal wage.
    Then - see how things are going. Where I live, community college ASN costs less than 6-months university refresher.
    Not that much physical effort as a CNA??? Have you worked as a CNA, because I have and it certainly isn't easy!

  • May 26

    Hospitals designed by people who don't work in hospitals.

    Our rooms are a ridiculous shape because the building is not rectangular. The soap is not within arm's reach of the sinks. The call light on the wall is between the bed and the computer, behind the ortho chair. But there's this weird stretch of room that the pt can't use because none of the alarms or the call light will reach. If the patient puts their call light on while they're up in the ortho chair, you're going to get VERY friendly in the attempt to turn it back off.

    I worked at a place that was a converted office building: 45 rooms in one long hallway.

    I could go on.

  • May 26

    Quote from RNdynamic
    To everyone saying that not enough sleep is an excuse, or that the OP is hurting her coworkers by calling out, or whatever else: It's none of her coworkers business why she is calling out. She could be calling out because she's having a bad hair day and it's still none of their business. Her PTO, her privilege. If she's still in compliant with the attendance policy, then it isn't any of her coworkers concern if she calls out for lack of sleep.

    Truth.
    Wait. Hold up.

    (Rubbing eyes in confusion)

    I actually AGREE with something RNdynamic said???

    The world is spinning off its axis.

  • May 26

    To everyone saying that not enough sleep is an excuse, or that the OP is hurting her coworkers by calling out, or whatever else: It's none of her coworkers business why she is calling out. She could be calling out because she's having a bad hair day and it's still none of their business. Her PTO, her privilege. If she's still in compliant with the attendance policy, then it isn't any of her coworkers concern if she calls out for lack of sleep.

    Truth.

  • May 26

    Quote from zombieghoast
    I would suggest maybe looking part time babysitting or pet sitting job. That's what I am gonna do for the summer.
    this suggestion is for the husband, right?

  • May 26

    1. Google up some hospitals in the city you're considering moving
    2. Find their websites, specifically the jobs, employment, or careers section
    3. See if they require a BSN to work there

    Based on the above, consider this:
    1. Get an associate degree in nursing (ASN/ADN)
    2. Pass the NCLEX
    3. Get employed, depending on the above
    4. Do BSN online for less money, maybe even get a discount or reimbursement through work
    5. Never worry about whether you need a BSN again

  • May 26

    Drink cheap beer like Busch or Natural Light.

  • May 26

    This topic, is literally over four decades old.....not meaning to be rude, but this June, I will have been a RN, for 44 years....

    depends on market demographics

  • May 26

    I'm "just" an ASN and I have no student loans at all. BSNs make the same as ASN nurses in my city.

  • May 26

    Pretty sure that nurses are ethically required to be fit for duty,
    when they present to provide cares, & must be cognizant of this.

    If your functional capacity is compromised, even by fatigue,
    it is best to call in, rather than risk a real bad outcome.

  • May 26

    Quote from Horseshoe
    According to this employment law attorney, not true.



    This caveat into how much detail they can require:



    What’s Your Boss Allowed to Ask When You Call In Sick? | On Careers | US News

    That said, I don't think that most employers care why you're calling in unless it's a habit that is causing problems. And I don't think that they are actually going to press people for exact details either if the employee doesn't want to give them, whether or not it is legal for them to do so.

    You can quote as many questionable "sources" as you want.
    Fact is that it is easy to make a mistake as a supervisor or manager when asking why somebody calls out. If you "request" information and it turns out that the employee calls out due to something that is related to the ADA you are already "in trouble".
    There are situations when you have to ask for information but you have to be very specific. For example - if you have noro virus going around and somebody calls out you can ask if the person has a temp above 100F, diarrhea ,vomiting - usually there is a policy covering those events.
    Or you can ask about flu symptoms if the flu is going around so you can advice the employee to stay at home according to policy and have them follow up with occupational health.
    But other than that you have to be careful. I was always advised by HR not to poke around when people call out. Instead track absences, start corrective action if they exceed the max amount of unplanned absences according to policy and in some cases that leads to termination.
    I did not notice people calling out more because I did not try the Spanish Inquisition.

  • May 25

    wow - I just saw all the comments about "rn", and "good hospitals only take bsn's" and all that . Why do nurses with BSN's still believe that they are superior? It's nice to have a BSN, sure. If you did it all at once up front - great for you. BUT as many have TRIED to call attention to - and it seems to keep being ignored - most accredited ASN programs have VERY LITTLE DIFFERENCE IN CURRICULUM vs the BSN programs. THE ONLY difference usually is what someone else said here - about a year - maybe less actually - of ELECTIVE/non clinical courses - such as "nursing today", and "health trends in America" and "leadership and staffing in the 21st century" -those types of courses. EVERYTHING ELSE - med-surg, psych 1, psych 2, abnormal psych, psych nursing, nutrition, labor and delivery, pediatrics, microbiology, anatomy, physiology, advanced physiology, pharmacology 1, pharmacology 2, geriatrics, 3 levels of math, fundamentals, sociology, ethics, cultural awareness, burn rotations, cardiac rotations, labor and delivery clinical, psych unit rotations, surgery rotations, etc etc etc - ASNs' have to do ALL of that - and we had SIM labs, and extensive paper writing. . . .

    The ONLY stuff BSNs' really have are the foo foo courses I mentioned above - the only reason why the RN to BSN takes as long as it does is because in effort to make more money off each student the universities come up with some cockamamie excuse to force us to take un-necessary courses along with any genuinely needed nursing courses.

    AND - here in the Midwest MOST hospitals WILL hire ASN's with an agreement to complete their BSN within 5 years.

    The ONLY reason why they are doing that is because of this magnet status thing - and nurses I talked to who worked in hospitals with magnet status described it as only being "more paperwork" for nurses. "Magnet status" is nothing more than a marketing tool for hospitals to use in their advertising/brochures, etc. Also helps them seek other status changes -but is relatively meaningless on the bottom line.

  • May 25

    Quote from summerly
    Most hospitals require a BSN degree upon hire now. Especially magnet hospitals. It's becoming a baseline necessity for RN's. Would be smart to acquire one. I started out with my ADN then did ADN to BSN. Now doing BSN to MSN.

    Agree the smart thing to do is to go ahead and get the degree. I do see the irony of Magnet hospitals supposedly requiring BSNs (not in my area). The worst work environments for nurses and employers of last resort are typically Magnet hospitals.
    In my area there are "BSN preferred" on a lot of jobs, but I haven't seen any "BSN required" on staff nursing jobs yet.

  • May 25

    This is such a geographically linked topic that it is almost impossible to debate.

    Where I live, an ASN/ADN has no problem finding employment and LPN's while not hired as much in the hospital setting are still very much in demand in LTC, home health, school nursing and clinics. Just about any non-acute health care setting really.

    But I understand that is not the case for many other areas. It all really comes down to where you live or maybe more importantly where you are able to live. Not everybody is capable of packing up and moving across the country to find a job, if you find yourself in that position you need to get the degree that will give you the best chance of finding employment where you live.


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