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Been there,done that 35,044 Views

Joined Aug 4, '09. Posts: 5,035 (73% Liked) Likes: 18,881

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  • Dec 6

    I work from home as an RN case manager from an insurance company.

    Although I do not have children, my coworkers who do have kids must still utilize childcare at least 16 to 20 hours weekly. It would be unprofessional for you to be on the phone with clients and customers while kids are crying in the background.

    I earn in the mid-$70k range yearly.

  • Dec 6

    I agree with all of the above. I work from home, am fortunate in having adult children so no day care to worry about. I have quotas I must meet, and am on the phone with doctors and online call in meetings, so having children at home and trying to work wouldn't be feasible. It's a job like any other, except that I do it primarily from my house. When my DIL was expecting, she was talking about finding something from home and I told her...with few exceptions, I think you'll find that any job you get is still going to require that you find daycare or a sitter. Just because it's done from home doesn't mean the requirements are less stringent..in many cases, they're probably more so.

  • Dec 6

    First and foremost, I love having a marketable skill and being paid for it.

    Nursing is amusing. Some days it's a veritable freak show. The people you meet are so varied! People can really open up to their nurses, it's almost like being a priest in the confessional.

    I love the process of building trust with the patients. Then, the peek into their worlds is fascinating.

  • Dec 6

    In regard to having doors shut in your face, you need to realize that nurses are giving sensitive care to patients that you can't witness. I've had to reach over with one foot many times to shut the door when housekeeping attempts to enter the room during codes, suctioning, a bath and pericare, and, quite frequently, when the physician is examining the patient or talking with family. That's not rudeness aimed at you. Patient care always comes first above cleaning the room.

  • Dec 4

    Quote from elkpark
    In the hospitals in which I've worked over the years, liquor (whiskey, vodka) came in 30cc individual dose cups like MOM, dispensed by the pharmacy. Beer comes in the usual 12 oz cans (some inexpensive brand), sent up from the kitchen with meal trays. I've always been amused that, in hospitals (at least the ones I've known), ethanol as liquor is considered a drug and ethanol as beer is considered food.
    That's because, beer IS food, duh. Especially dark, craft beer.

  • Dec 4

    In the hospitals in which I've worked over the years, liquor (whiskey, vodka) came in 30cc individual dose cups like MOM, dispensed by the pharmacy. Beer comes in the usual 12 oz cans (some inexpensive brand), sent up from the kitchen with meal trays. I've always been amused that, in hospitals (at least the ones I've known), ethanol as liquor is considered a drug and ethanol as beer is considered food.

  • Dec 3

    I'll have to talk to my kids. If I end up in the rest home, make sure I get my before dinner glass of wine, or two...

  • Dec 3

    I would draw the line at cheap whiskey.

  • Dec 3

    This was more common back in more sensible times. The patient is obviously a daily drinker and needs his maintenance dose.

    My late husband got wine with meals in the hospital to help his appetite thanks to a very caring dietitian to whom I'm forever grateful.

    America is still puritanical regarding alcoholic beverages. But with 5% of the world's population we consume 70% of the world's prescribed pharmaceuticals. We are one of 2 nations allowing direct to consumer advertising of drugs. Yet we get nervous at a daily glass of wine or 2.

  • Dec 1

    I've heard two years to feel OK and seven years to feel pretty competent. That seems to be true for me, so far.

  • Nov 29

    Welcome to being an aide.

    Edit: for clarification. All these things that people are asking you to do are your job.

  • Nov 29

    So, your saying all the nurses do is sit there and play on their phones, while you run around doing everything? Who's assessing, passing meds, getting lab results, calling report, and discharging? Oh and let's not forget the massive amount of charting that has to be done on each patient.

    Yes, you are a paramedic, which applies outside the hospital walls. When you are employed inside the hospital walls, you re a tech. That is your scope of practice, which includes all of the job duties you just described.

    You are new. You are already complaining. I think you need to look at things from another perspective. I just think you don't understand what all a nurse does.

  • Nov 28

    I prefer to be recognized monetarily.

  • Nov 24

    You need to do more research. The two are world's apart

  • Nov 24

    If the RN program that you are considering only requires a HS diploma/GED and a passing entrance exam score, I conclude it is at an investor-owned school of poor repute.


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