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Been there,done that 36,550 Views

Joined Aug 4, '09. Posts: 5,126 (73% Liked) Likes: 19,360

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  • Jan 19

    Quote from Ben_D_Over
    Right... show her the equation Rose_Queen! haha
    Are you suggesting that we should just provide the answer ro the OP?

  • Jan 17

    Welcome to Nursing KY...

    Don't take this the wrong way... You are incompetent!!!
    However... we all started out that way.
    School gave you a very rudementery idea of nursing.
    It set you up to be a sponge... jam all this knowledge into our brains, absorb most of it, and be able to function. (just like a sponge)
    Reality is different than school and you will learn so much once you are on the job. There are going to be so many people that are going to help you become competent.
    Over time you will be competent.

    Embrace the sponge!!!

    lol

    -Matt-

  • Jan 16

    You are incompetent! You are a student with no experience! It will be OK!!!!! You will gain competence and confidence in your first year or two. I had an internship on a med-surg-tele floor when I was in nursing school so felt very prepared when I started. But even if your experience is limited, just don't stress yourself out about it. If you read through the allnurses board you will find hundreds of posts by stressed out nursing students. Just relax, finish school, and be open to your future. You will have no end to the possibilities for experience, learning, and employment. Stay cool and be professional!

  • Jan 16

    I'll just be bluntly honest: in both the situations I've personally worked where there was dangerous short staffing, nothing changed it. Absolutely nothing. Not doctors complaining, not sentinel events, not nurses leaving in droves, nothing. Nothing, nothing, nothing. The administration couldn't see the forest for the trees (translation: the almighty dollar) and absolutely would not listen to anything anybody said. I walked away, both times, and never looked back. Both places are still unmitigated disasters. One of them I left 16 years ago and it is STILL an understaffed nightmare.

  • Jan 12

    I've never heard of this -- though I've seen various units employ different tactics to keep noise level down. It's a worthwhile effort. In the ICUs I've worked in everything seems so close and the patients are pretty exposed (by necessity). That's even more true in a NICU. I agree there are a number of noises that could set something like that off (and those should be addressed too). I also know it's easy for me to lose track of the decibel of my own voice -- I don't mind reminders.

  • Jan 12

    I would hope that somebody is paying attention to what sets it off and is making steps to fix THOSE noises. The light does no good if its just ignored. But if alarms and call bells are setting it off....then maybe somebody needs to be looking at a way to lower those ambient noises. (Which, again, research shows are a problem not only because of too much noise but also alarm fatigue.)

  • Jan 12

    I'm okay with these. They way I've seen them used is to create an awareness of the noise level, not to be punitive. The amount of noise in a hospital contributes to the difficulty patients have in getting any rest, and we know that rest is important to healing - research shows that. I'd venture to say that being aware of noise levels in a NICU is even more important - premature babies are incredibly sensitive to over-stimulation, and noise is a part of that. We could all probably stand to be a little more aware of the volume level in patient care areas - and I dont just mean nurses, I mean everybody.

  • Jan 12

    Well, how often does it go red?

  • Jan 12

    Quote from NurseCard
    Wow, this is supposed to be used in classrooms, not in a workplace of adults!
    Just wow.
    I don't think they're worried about the volume of the work place of adults. I think they're worried about the volume of the healing place of patients.

  • Jan 12

    We don't use that particular brand, but in general I'm glad that these are around. I don't mind being reminded when I'm using my 'midnight-at-the-bar' voice instead of my midnight-in-the-hospital voice, and helping visitors be aware of their noise level is also pretty important. Is there a belief that we shouldn't try and limit excessive noise in the hospital environment?

  • Jan 11

    I will agree with the other posters and also add this: Get used to answering once in a while and saying "No, I cannot come in today." It's a skill you'll need to develop. Trust me.

  • Jan 11

    You're not obligated to answer any calls from work when you aren't on the clock. Regardless of why you don't answer or don't want to pick up time, it's the facility's job to make sure the unit is fully staffed, not yours.

    If people talk about it, let them. That kind of pettiness will be present in any job you happen to take in the future. You'll do well to learn to ignore it now.

  • Jan 11

    I don't answer the phone on my day off. I let it go to voicemail and I'll call back if warranted. It is not my responsibility to staff my unit and it's not yours either. I pick up shifts only when it works for me and I decide I want to. Do not feel bad for knowing your limits and setting them.

  • Jan 11

    No, not answering the phone is your right. I wouldn't let that make you feel bad. If they have staffing issues, you are not the answer to them all.

    Focus on studying and work as much as you need to and let the rest roll off your back.

    I regularly screen my calls. And don't answer.

  • Jan 11

    Quote from Sour Lemon
    Don't answer if you don't want to work. And if you happen to answer accidentally, tell them you've had a few drinks and you're about to have a few more. The "studying" thing makes you sound boring.
    Don't answer if you don't want to work, and if you do happen to answer, just say no. The "few drinks" comment given a few times makes you sound as though you have a drinking issue.


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