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Been there,done that 36,369 Views

Joined Aug 4, '09. Posts: 5,116 (73% Liked) Likes: 19,296

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  • 3:05 am

    Been there, done that. I have been threatened for writing up CNA's for lousy work ethic and insubordination. Their threats did not scare me, management supported me and dealt. However, if management is not going to respond to your write-ups and start the disciplinary process, your hands are tied.

    There are many other places to work, where you have management support.

  • Jan 15

    Quote from RNdynamic
    Do not report him. If you do, you are likely not a good person.

    I have a history of diverting IV narcotics. I was eventually caught because of a pharmacy audit. There was an investigation taking place while I was in a rehab facility and I didn't even know it. Almost all nurses who divert drugs are eventually caught and when they are caught, it is through a paper trail. For example, where I worked if a nurse pulling narcotics at a rate of three standard deviations above what is average for their unit, they get flagged and a critical eye is put on them. Eventually their addiction catches up to them.


    If I were you, I would leave it alone. You could really be sabotaging him by demonstrating that you know about his diversion. When a nurse is diverting drugs, management will often try to rehabilitate that nurse as long as the nurses' peers have no knowledge about it. The moment that you demonstrate that you are aware of what the nurse is doing, management will assume everyone else knows and they will be much less likely to give that nurse a probably well-deserved second chance because they will be afraid of drama and rumor and so forth. It becomes a bigger issue at that point.

    If you take the initiative by reporting, you are really doing some unnecessary harm.
    Nurses have a DUTY to report. Not protect. OP is is legally bound to do so and needs to report ASAP. OP is smart.. be like OP.

  • Jan 15

    Are you saying you are signing for a narcotic waste, when you do not know what is in the syringe?

    What is the frequency of habitually?

    IF he is watching for you to give a narc, then pull this trick... he is using you and deserves anything he gets.

  • Jan 15

    Quote from RNdynamic
    Do not report him. If you do, you are likely not a good person.

    I have a history of diverting IV narcotics. I was eventually caught because of a pharmacy audit. There was an investigation taking place while I was in a rehab facility and I didn't even know it. Almost all nurses who divert drugs are eventually caught and when they are caught, it is through a paper trail. For example, where I worked if a nurse pulling narcotics at a rate of three standard deviations above what is average for their unit, they get flagged and a critical eye is put on them. Eventually their addiction catches up to them.


    If I were you, I would leave it alone. You could really be sabotaging him by demonstrating that you know about his diversion. When a nurse is diverting drugs, management will often try to rehabilitate that nurse as long as the nurses' peers have no knowledge about it. The moment that you demonstrate that you are aware of what the nurse is doing, management will assume everyone else knows and they will be much less likely to give that nurse a probably well-deserved second chance because they will be afraid of drama and rumor and so forth. It becomes a bigger issue at that point.

    If you take the initiative by reporting, you are really doing some unnecessary harm.
    Nurses have a DUTY to report. Not protect. OP is is legally bound to do so and needs to report ASAP. OP is smart.. be like OP.

  • Jan 15

    We are not academic advisors. Discuss this with her school counselors.
    It appears she could complete her pre-requisites in either an ASN or BSN program. But then she would still need to be accepted to nursing school. GPA is only a part of that process.
    Plenty of bright people have tried to get into nursing school and didn't make the cut.

  • Jan 14

    Being placed on the abuse registry is as serious as it gets. You would not be able to work in a facility that accepts Medicare, which is just about all of them.
    I don't know if the nurse aide abuse sanction would follow you to professional licensure. You need to consult a lawyer, before you go forward with your studies.
    " For years I've let the fear of even trying cripple me. ". You must face your fears head on.
    I wish I had a BS in computer science, nursing sucks.

  • Jan 13

    Your CMA certification has no bearing towards a LPN or RN program.
    Any reputable school will not accept you into the spring program.

    We are not academic advisors. Consult with counselors at accredited colleges. Agree that 30K is outrageous for LPN, stay away from for profit schools. You will not get your ADN in 24 months. ADN requires 2 years of study, after acceptance to a nursing program.. following successful (or concurrent) nursing pre-requisites.

  • Jan 13

    I have worked on 2 units with these stoplights. I was skeptical at first, but found myself paying attention when it turned red. It's only a visual cue that the noise level is getting out of hand.
    Don't take it personally. Anything that may keep the noise level down, so patients can rest.. is a good thing.

  • Jan 13

    Quote from NewRN'16
    Nursing is not a walk in the park. I was a PCT in nursing school, and I've never encountered in real life so many whining snowflakes as I have here.
    Not all nurses handle the first year in the same way. Your PCT experience gave you insight into the reality of nursing.
    Instead of patting yourself on the back, extend that hand to your fellow nurses that need it.

    Get back to us in a year. After you have handled that patient load on your own for awhile.

  • Jan 13

    Been there, done that. I have been threatened for writing up CNA's for lousy work ethic and insubordination. Their threats did not scare me, management supported me and dealt. However, if management is not going to respond to your write-ups and start the disciplinary process, your hands are tied.

    There are many other places to work, where you have management support.

  • Jan 13

    Quote from NewRN'16
    Nursing is not a walk in the park. I was a PCT in nursing school, and I've never encountered in real life so many whining snowflakes as I have here.
    Not all nurses handle the first year in the same way. Your PCT experience gave you insight into the reality of nursing.
    Instead of patting yourself on the back, extend that hand to your fellow nurses that need it.

    Get back to us in a year. After you have handled that patient load on your own for awhile.

  • Jan 13

    Been there, done that. I have been threatened for writing up CNA's for lousy work ethic and insubordination. Their threats did not scare me, management supported me and dealt. However, if management is not going to respond to your write-ups and start the disciplinary process, your hands are tied.

    There are many other places to work, where you have management support.

  • Jan 13

    We have ALL made med errors. If everybody quit nursing over them, there would be nobody left.

    This was surely multidisciplinary failure. You lost the pharmacy check, they should have questioned it. What was the time the for administration entered by the physician?
    Hind sight is 20/20, but doubling up on combo insulin , should never happen.
    Refresh yourself on peak times for insulin.

  • Jan 13

    Been there, done that. I have been threatened for writing up CNA's for lousy work ethic and insubordination. Their threats did not scare me, management supported me and dealt. However, if management is not going to respond to your write-ups and start the disciplinary process, your hands are tied.

    There are many other places to work, where you have management support.

  • Jan 13

    I don't know what school you were accepted to. I doubt that your orientation focused on the negatives. They were trying to tell you that nursing school is a tough gig.
    If you are crying at the thought.. you may not have what it takes.
    It takes heart and soul, blood ,sweat and tears.

    I liked the paycheck, saving lives, and challenging myself.

    Best of luck to you, let us know how it's going.


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