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Been there,done that 42,147 Views

Joined Aug 4, '09. Posts: 5,328 (73% Liked) Likes: 20,464

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  • 2:24 pm

    Quote from DeeAngel
    If you are still so unhappy then hire a lawyer and sue for hostile work environment. Do that or let it go.
    Exactly. OP made an emotional decision. She still has plenty of recourse. The right attorney CAN get her damages and get that corporate machine thinking.

  • 12:47 am

    My manager's age is not an issue, as long as they respect ME and take into consideration my depth of knowledge and my years of experience.

  • May 26

    You would need to consult an attorney for that leg to stand on.

    You don't need our permission to help your friend. I would make sure I had another job before I took on that very large corporation.

  • May 25

    Quote from nursel56
    I would say the question is more, is it acceptable to your employer. One thing I've learned from reading people's experiences here is sometimes employers treat nurses with a great work ethic in a deplorable way, sometimes demanding the nurse find her own replacement, drag themselves into the workplace while sick under threat of termination, etc. It's just ugly sometimes.

    I don't know if you are switching from nights to days permanently, it's no fun at first, but neither does anybody totally adjust to a changed sleep schedule in one night. I hate to work on 1-2 hours of sleep, but I find that once I am at work and busy, I feel much better than I thought I would.

    Everyone is different I know, but it does get better progressively if you can manage the initial rough days. If you do call off, I would in your case say probably best to describe your physical symptoms without being specific about the "why". Hope things get better for you soon.
    We are professionals. It is NOT required to "describe your symptoms". That is protected health information. "I will not be in today" is ALL that is required when calling off.

  • May 24

    "being spoken down to, lied to and yelled at." Is this management or patients?

    Seriously.. this is the manipulative drug seeker's behavior. Managing and treating this behavior is part of the treatment protocol. Your facility should have a plan in place to deal with it.
    Being spoken down to is a subjective experience.. just remember, YOU are the one with the keys.
    Unclear on what you mean by being lied to.
    As far as being yelled AT... h*ll to the no, turn and walk away. They'll stop yelling when they realize it will only take that much longer to get their meds.What is the facilities protocol for managing that behavior?

  • May 24

    Quote from tsm007
    This could be a fun topic. I floated to our sister hospital last night and it's got a total different culture there and honest the pt population is completely different and new to me. I was totally thrown off by this question. I called about my pt who is stage 4 breast cancer pt. The pts PTA meds included 4mg dilaudid I think it was q4hrs PO PRN. Not 100% on that. She had dilaudid 1mg q 3 hours IV which she said was not touching her pain.

    All I got from the on call doc was "does she look like she's in pain?". She never did put any new orders in. This is bugging the heck out of me. Not so much that there were no new orders put in. I get it if you think the pt's a drug seeker and you don't want to prescribe, but since when are med orders determined by whether the nurse thinks the pt looks like they are in pain? This goes against everything that is taught on pain management. I have no problems with someone not giving more pain meds just because someone rates their pain at a 10 every single time you assess them if you the provider don't think it's appropriate or necessary for their condition, but it just bugs me that I'm expected to determine whether a pt is in pain or not by whether they look like they are in pain. Anyway, I guess this is a common question they ask over there if you call about pain meds and just thought I'd throw it out on the table for interesting nursing conversation. What's your thoughts on this question folks?
    No fun involved here. The patient is complaining of pain, regardless if YOU have "experience" with their culture.
    The doctor's question was inappropriate. Report the pain scale.. get an order to relieve their pain. Many patients are stoic and require advanced nursing assessment and intervention, in order to get them comfortable. There is NO ceiling to narcotic administration in Stage 4 cancer patients. I have administered 80 mgs of morphine to relieve pain.

    This is NOT about you or the doctors interpretation. GET THEM COMFORTABLE.. whatever it takes.

  • May 23

    Quote from tsm007
    This could be a fun topic. I floated to our sister hospital last night and it's got a total different culture there and honest the pt population is completely different and new to me. I was totally thrown off by this question. I called about my pt who is stage 4 breast cancer pt. The pts PTA meds included 4mg dilaudid I think it was q4hrs PO PRN. Not 100% on that. She had dilaudid 1mg q 3 hours IV which she said was not touching her pain.

    All I got from the on call doc was "does she look like she's in pain?". She never did put any new orders in. This is bugging the heck out of me. Not so much that there were no new orders put in. I get it if you think the pt's a drug seeker and you don't want to prescribe, but since when are med orders determined by whether the nurse thinks the pt looks like they are in pain? This goes against everything that is taught on pain management. I have no problems with someone not giving more pain meds just because someone rates their pain at a 10 every single time you assess them if you the provider don't think it's appropriate or necessary for their condition, but it just bugs me that I'm expected to determine whether a pt is in pain or not by whether they look like they are in pain. Anyway, I guess this is a common question they ask over there if you call about pain meds and just thought I'd throw it out on the table for interesting nursing conversation. What's your thoughts on this question folks?
    No fun involved here. The patient is complaining of pain, regardless if YOU have "experience" with their culture.
    The doctor's question was inappropriate. Report the pain scale.. get an order to relieve their pain. Many patients are stoic and require advanced nursing assessment and intervention, in order to get them comfortable. There is NO ceiling to narcotic administration in Stage 4 cancer patients. I have administered 80 mgs of morphine to relieve pain.

    This is NOT about you or the doctors interpretation. GET THEM COMFORTABLE.. whatever it takes.

  • May 22

    You would need to consult an attorney for that leg to stand on.

    You don't need our permission to help your friend. I would make sure I had another job before I took on that very large corporation.

  • May 22

    Certainly ask the supervisor if you are not clear on the action. CPAP is a respiratory intervention that requires a doctor's order, that RT would need to provide.

    Now you know the process. Educate yourself on CPAP/ BI-PAP respiratory therapy. It is the same as providing previously prescribed home medications. If the prescribed therapy is not continued... the patient could get in big trouble.. fast.

  • May 22

    Quote from tsm007
    This could be a fun topic. I floated to our sister hospital last night and it's got a total different culture there and honest the pt population is completely different and new to me. I was totally thrown off by this question. I called about my pt who is stage 4 breast cancer pt. The pts PTA meds included 4mg dilaudid I think it was q4hrs PO PRN. Not 100% on that. She had dilaudid 1mg q 3 hours IV which she said was not touching her pain.

    All I got from the on call doc was "does she look like she's in pain?". She never did put any new orders in. This is bugging the heck out of me. Not so much that there were no new orders put in. I get it if you think the pt's a drug seeker and you don't want to prescribe, but since when are med orders determined by whether the nurse thinks the pt looks like they are in pain? This goes against everything that is taught on pain management. I have no problems with someone not giving more pain meds just because someone rates their pain at a 10 every single time you assess them if you the provider don't think it's appropriate or necessary for their condition, but it just bugs me that I'm expected to determine whether a pt is in pain or not by whether they look like they are in pain. Anyway, I guess this is a common question they ask over there if you call about pain meds and just thought I'd throw it out on the table for interesting nursing conversation. What's your thoughts on this question folks?
    No fun involved here. The patient is complaining of pain, regardless if YOU have "experience" with their culture.
    The doctor's question was inappropriate. Report the pain scale.. get an order to relieve their pain. Many patients are stoic and require advanced nursing assessment and intervention, in order to get them comfortable. There is NO ceiling to narcotic administration in Stage 4 cancer patients. I have administered 80 mgs of morphine to relieve pain.

    This is NOT about you or the doctors interpretation. GET THEM COMFORTABLE.. whatever it takes.

  • May 22

    Quote from tsm007
    This could be a fun topic. I floated to our sister hospital last night and it's got a total different culture there and honest the pt population is completely different and new to me. I was totally thrown off by this question. I called about my pt who is stage 4 breast cancer pt. The pts PTA meds included 4mg dilaudid I think it was q4hrs PO PRN. Not 100% on that. She had dilaudid 1mg q 3 hours IV which she said was not touching her pain.

    All I got from the on call doc was "does she look like she's in pain?". She never did put any new orders in. This is bugging the heck out of me. Not so much that there were no new orders put in. I get it if you think the pt's a drug seeker and you don't want to prescribe, but since when are med orders determined by whether the nurse thinks the pt looks like they are in pain? This goes against everything that is taught on pain management. I have no problems with someone not giving more pain meds just because someone rates their pain at a 10 every single time you assess them if you the provider don't think it's appropriate or necessary for their condition, but it just bugs me that I'm expected to determine whether a pt is in pain or not by whether they look like they are in pain. Anyway, I guess this is a common question they ask over there if you call about pain meds and just thought I'd throw it out on the table for interesting nursing conversation. What's your thoughts on this question folks?
    No fun involved here. The patient is complaining of pain, regardless if YOU have "experience" with their culture.
    The doctor's question was inappropriate. Report the pain scale.. get an order to relieve their pain. Many patients are stoic and require advanced nursing assessment and intervention, in order to get them comfortable. There is NO ceiling to narcotic administration in Stage 4 cancer patients. I have administered 80 mgs of morphine to relieve pain.

    This is NOT about you or the doctors interpretation. GET THEM COMFORTABLE.. whatever it takes.

  • May 22

    What hours will your husband be available for, and willing to provide childcare? Bear in mind, working nights means, you need childcare for your working hours, and your sleeping hours.

    Seems like you have many great options, that only you and your husband can arrange.

  • May 22

    You would need to consult an attorney for that leg to stand on.

    You don't need our permission to help your friend. I would make sure I had another job before I took on that very large corporation.

  • May 21

    PRN status is defined by the facility. Some facilities require 2 days per month. You should know their baseline requirement, Then you could work more as needed.

  • May 20

    PRN status is defined by the facility. Some facilities require 2 days per month. You should know their baseline requirement, Then you could work more as needed.


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