Latest Likes For Been there,done that

Latest Likes For Been there,done that

Been there,done that 27,283 Views

Joined Aug 4, '09. Posts: 4,432 (71% Liked) Likes: 15,579

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  • Jun 28

    Taking a year off ...would equal throwing away all the work you put into your education.
    Seek treatment for your anxiety disorder. In the meantime , start applying for anything and everything. You might find a position that does not require hands-on, but that will only delay the fact you need to deal.

    With treatment, you CAN get through this.

    How did you get through your clinical rotations? Did not any of your instructors pick up on this?

  • Jun 28

    Many nurses deal with personal issues and the stress of nursing. Nursing is rarely a "joy".

    You need to separate work and outside issues. If you cannot, seek professional advice.

  • Jun 28

    Nurses have responsibilities, not duties. Everything we do requires observational and judgement skills. Sometimes, it is contraindicated to brush a patient's teeth. Consider the amount of expertise it takes to make THAT judgement.
    I found my time as a psych nurse was invaluable. I learned how to observe human behavior and had to use all my skills to properly treat the psych patient. Nothing like hands on!

    Best of luck with your journey.

  • Jun 28

    Many nurses deal with personal issues and the stress of nursing. Nursing is rarely a "joy".

    You need to separate work and outside issues. If you cannot, seek professional advice.

  • Jun 28

    Quote from NotAllWhoWandeRN
    To rub a little salt into the uncertainty, my employer sent me a letter today saying that as a new employee, my job is not protected by Worker's Compensation. *It is possible that your position may no longer be available at the time you return to work.* I am not eligible for FMLA because I have not been with the employer for a year.

    In other words, I am disposable. It makes me wonder if I should start looking for that doctor's office position... Or any position, really. On the other hand, the unit (and the other med/surg units in the hospital) is still consistently understaffed. I get regular pages from the central staffing system that they need nurses... so I don't THINK they would dump me and go through the cost of training someone new?

    This. This is me coming unglued.
    Each and everyone of is disposable. You do not have the option of being broken or unglued.

    Re -read your latest communication. All staff nurses will have their position held for 12 weeks. Any extension, is then up to management. How much do you think your employer owes you?

    Yes the unit needs you, but you are not physically able to fill the needs. This is a moot point.
    You need to take responsibility for yourself now. Find a position you can physically perform , while you heal.

    Best of luck to you... but you really need to move on. It's now up to you.

  • Jun 28

    "they always ask me what the medications are, which can become annoying ".
    The family is seeking emotional support. The reason you can't sleep is because you made the issue all about YOU.
    Instead of forcing something on the patient that he hates, advocate for him and discuss alternatives with the physician.

  • Jun 28

    Quote from ArrowRN
    I don't think someone's ambition should be called reprehensible because they know what they want to do in life. Fact is CRNA has an ICU requirement, how else is this person to meet those requirements? Many nurses start in med-surg and dont give a ratspooty about that either, after year 1 new med-surg nurses flock to other fields. It's attitudes like this that always makes me suggest to others, never let your nurse managers know your true ambitions, especially not at interviews, not even when you on the floors don't tell your coworkers either...no matter how friendly they are...in other words OP don't go to an ICU interview telling them how much you want to be a CRNA, they'll figure you won't be around long and you'll never get the job.
    It's rat's patooty. Fact is leadership in ICU has an experience requirement.

    I admire OP's career goals. Fact is.. they come in second to the needs of any staff and patients in an ICU.

    I have worked in ICU. I expect the charge nurse to know as much.. and more than I do.
    Charge nurse needs to be on top of the chaos. Able to jump in and assist in any ICU procedure, able to tell the ICU resident that their orders are incorrect. NOT sitting in an office, making out the schedule and planning their career moves.

  • Jun 28

    You have the golden one year of experience. What "skills" are dwindling? Starting IV's and inserting Foleys are tasks.
    You have licensure to teach, monitor and observe patients. Think outside the box.

  • Jun 28

    Nurses have responsibilities, not duties. Everything we do requires observational and judgement skills. Sometimes, it is contraindicated to brush a patient's teeth. Consider the amount of expertise it takes to make THAT judgement.
    I found my time as a psych nurse was invaluable. I learned how to observe human behavior and had to use all my skills to properly treat the psych patient. Nothing like hands on!

    Best of luck with your journey.

  • Jun 28

    Quote from RNperdiem
    You would have felt worse if you had lied to them and given the patient and family false reassurance.
    Denial is something that does not vanish overnight; it has a protective function. It is chipped away bit by bit by taking in the truth a little at a time. It sounds like you gave the news tactfully and truthfully.
    It is not OP's job to give the "news". It is OP's job to provide emotional support.

  • Jun 28

    Following parameters will always include nursing judgment. Consider the baseline patient vitals when holding anything. Heart rate of 62 and giving a beta blocker is not a concern, unless the patient has OTHER issues.
    As long as you notify promptly when you decide not to give a prescribed medication, you will ( and the patient will )be okay.
    Too bad if the provider is "bothered" ..better safe than sorry.

    Carry on.. good job.

  • Jun 28

    Following parameters will always include nursing judgment. Consider the baseline patient vitals when holding anything. Heart rate of 62 and giving a beta blocker is not a concern, unless the patient has OTHER issues.
    As long as you notify promptly when you decide not to give a prescribed medication, you will ( and the patient will )be okay.
    Too bad if the provider is "bothered" ..better safe than sorry.

    Carry on.. good job.

  • Jun 28

    "they always ask me what the medications are, which can become annoying ".
    The family is seeking emotional support. The reason you can't sleep is because you made the issue all about YOU.
    Instead of forcing something on the patient that he hates, advocate for him and discuss alternatives with the physician.

  • Jun 28

    Right.. blame it on the nurses.

    For future reference, any rash/crusted rash is NOT a normal condition. Review your facility's policy on PPE and make YOURSELF accountable.

  • Jun 28

    "they always ask me what the medications are, which can become annoying ".
    The family is seeking emotional support. The reason you can't sleep is because you made the issue all about YOU.
    Instead of forcing something on the patient that he hates, advocate for him and discuss alternatives with the physician.


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