Latest Likes For klone

Latest Likes For klone

klone, MSN, RN 61,315 Views

Joined Apr 2, '03 - from 'Denver, CO, US'. klone is a L&D. She has '10+' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Women's health, research, lactation'. Posts: 10,867 (54% Liked) Likes: 25,662

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  • 9:57 am

    Quote from HeartsOpenWide
    a new grad cost about $60,000 to train
    I've heard that number bandied about before. Do you have an article or study on the subject?

  • Sep 23

    Thanks guys, appreciate it! It will be my last legacy to my clinic (my last day is Friday) - that the next supervisor never have to go hunting throughout the hospital for one of our G.D. ultrasound machines that got borrowed overnight and not returned.

  • Sep 22

    Thanks. I'm looking at them to attach to our portable ultrasound machines, which often get "borrowed," not for our nurses.

    It's not a Vocera.

    So, for those of you who use them, I'm just looking for brands for my research, not editorial opinions on the devices themselves. Hill-Rom is helpful. I just don't know what they're called.

  • Sep 21

    Thanks guys, appreciate it! It will be my last legacy to my clinic (my last day is Friday) - that the next supervisor never have to go hunting throughout the hospital for one of our G.D. ultrasound machines that got borrowed overnight and not returned.

  • Sep 21

    Thanks guys, appreciate it! It will be my last legacy to my clinic (my last day is Friday) - that the next supervisor never have to go hunting throughout the hospital for one of our G.D. ultrasound machines that got borrowed overnight and not returned.

  • Sep 21

    Did they know you were going to be in school when they offered you the LPN position? How are they working with you to accommodate your school hours?

  • Sep 20

    Very normal. It will take at least 6 months before you're comfortable and not feeling like your stomach is in a knot before each shift. Tough it out, every nursing position will have this type of learning curve. I would advise against going PRN until you've been in the role for at least a year and are no longer a novice. The best way to feel comfortable is to do it MORE, not less.

  • Sep 20

    Quote from dudette10
    There are a lot of holes in this story: Did she ingest peanuts? What were her presenting signs and symptoms? What was the medical assessment of the girl once she arrived at the hospital? Did anyone confirm that the pesto's pine nuts had been substituted with peanuts?
    I think that the nurse screwed up. As someone with a lifelong anaphylactic allergy to tree nuts, I side wholly with the student. It doesn't matter if she has NO presenting s/sx. If she believes she has ingested peanuts (and trust me, when your whole life you've been trained to detect a nut in a piece of food, you get pretty good at being able to discern if there are nuts in something or if you just ate a tiny bit of nut), then per her allergy plan, she should get the Epipen immediately. A delay could kill her. And it's not like we're dealing with a 6-year-old here. She's 14 or 15 years old, far old enough to take personal responsibility for her allergy and should be taken seriously about it.

    Even if the pesto did not have peanuts in it (and yes, I too have had false alarms), I believe it's still recommended that the Epipen be administered if you have strong belief there was an exposure, even if there aren't yet any sx.

  • Sep 20

    Quote from roser13
    The point is that you are most definitely NOT going to an online school named ATP. ATP has nothing to do with your classes.
    Or at least, classes that will earn you a degree.

  • Sep 20

    Quote from Mrsprice0507
    Okkkkkkk??????
    Okay. Have a good day.

    I have to say, your appearance here at this time, stating that it was the posts at THIS SITE that convinced you *TO* enroll in this program, seems a bit...curious.

  • Sep 20

    Quote from dudette10
    There are a lot of holes in this story: Did she ingest peanuts? What were her presenting signs and symptoms? What was the medical assessment of the girl once she arrived at the hospital? Did anyone confirm that the pesto's pine nuts had been substituted with peanuts?
    I think that the nurse screwed up. As someone with a lifelong anaphylactic allergy to tree nuts, I side wholly with the student. It doesn't matter if she has NO presenting s/sx. If she believes she has ingested peanuts (and trust me, when your whole life you've been trained to detect a nut in a piece of food, you get pretty good at being able to discern if there are nuts in something or if you just ate a tiny bit of nut), then per her allergy plan, she should get the Epipen immediately. A delay could kill her. And it's not like we're dealing with a 6-year-old here. She's 14 or 15 years old, far old enough to take personal responsibility for her allergy and should be taken seriously about it.

    Even if the pesto did not have peanuts in it (and yes, I too have had false alarms), I believe it's still recommended that the Epipen be administered if you have strong belief there was an exposure, even if there aren't yet any sx.

  • Sep 20

    I would just tell them that as soon as you realized it wasn't a good fit, you quit in an effort to save them additional time and resources to continue to orient you.

  • Sep 19

    Quote from Mrsprice0507
    Yes I know technically it's not but I go online for class and listen to a teacher for hours and take a test for a grade so to me it's school
    But to the rest of the world, and more importantly, to your state Board of Nursing that gives you the authority to sit for the NCLEX, it is not a school.

  • Sep 19

    I would just tell them that as soon as you realized it wasn't a good fit, you quit in an effort to save them additional time and resources to continue to orient you.

  • Sep 18

    At this time, the answer is no. Our info on it is constantly changing.


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