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klone, MSN, RN 78,984 Views

Joined Apr 2, '03 - from 'Oregon'. klone is a L&D. She has '10+' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Women's Health/OB Leadership'. Posts: 11,457 (55% Liked) Likes: 27,912

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  • 10:45 am

    Quote from calivianya
    Have you thought about moving?

    Plenty of areas of the country where they'd love to have nurses with experience, even older ones.
    THIS THIS THIS!

    Our facility is in DESPERATE need for experienced nurses! We live a fairly remote community in the Pacific Northwest, so unless you have family locally, most people have never heard of our town.

    We are slated to hire every single one of the new grads who just graduated, and that still won't fill all of our nursing positions.

    Because we're union, the pay is really good (seriously, WAY more than comparable jobs in Denver, from which I moved).

    So if you'd consider relocating to the PNW (or one of the other hundreds of small rural communities that have a nursing shortage), I can practically guarantee you'd have a job!

  • Jun 24

    Quote from NurseA1987
    I guess I found it most offensive because I felt as though those years of experience were overlooked because I was an LPN.
    Even if you *hadn't* had several years of LPN experience, calling someone a "baby nurse" is insulting and inappropriate.

  • Jun 24

    Quote from NurseA1987
    Just wondering, what do you all think constitutes someone being a "baby nurse"?
    The only nurse I call a "baby nurse" is a nurse who takes care of babies. I think it's an offensive term and contributes to the culture of lateral violence that many hospital units still struggle with.

    I prefer to support our new nurses, appreciate the unique life experiences and fresh knowledge they bring to the table, rather than insult and patronize them.

  • Jun 24

    And a suggestion...I would really recommend you do an RN-BSN program online somewhere else, then apply to the MSN program at Frontier once you have your BSN. With Frontier, the bridge coursework takes a year, $10K, and a LOT of hard work, and you do not have a degree to show for it when you complete it. In the same amount of time and for less money, you can get a BSN degree online through another school, and nobody can take that BSN away from you.

    Anyway, that's my suggestion from someone who did part of Frontier's bridge program and then decided to transfer out to get my BSN. Feel free to PM me if you want to discuss it further.

  • Jun 24

    The last two nurses I hired into our L&D unit actually took the time to seek me out in my office, introduce themselves, and tell me that they were interested in working in my unit. Both times I didn't have any openings at the time, but I remembered their names, and when openings came up, I encouraged them to apply.

    I like people who take the initiative and show that they're truly interested in the unit.

  • Jun 24

    I did my RN-BSN program through WGU. I then went back 6 months later and did my MSN in Leadership. I can't say enough good things about WGU.

    It's very common for math and science courses to "age out" after 5 years. For statistics, the material really needs to be fairly fresh in your brain in order to do well in the courses that heavily involve research.

  • Jun 23

    I agree, I don't think "almost every mom" should be getting one. When I started managing my current OB unit (after 4 years out of inpatient OB), I was a bit taken aback at how often nipple shields were given out (maybe 2-3 out of every 10 moms). Then I actually started reading the more recent research (and yes, I'm ashamed to admit that even as an IBCLC, I'm not up to date on the literature) and was surprised to read that the opinion on nipple shields has shifted, and that it doesn't decrease milk supply as I was always led to believe (which was based on old research on old shields that were much thicker).

  • Jun 23

    I became an IBCLC in the era of "nipple shields are bad!" However, newer research shows that the ultra-thin silicone shields do not interfere with lactogenesis II and infant weight gain, and for mothers who do use them, there is a high degree of maternal satisfaction. I have found that if you're spending 5-10+ minutes at every feeding trying to get an infant latched on, then it might be a good idea to try a shield. It can cut WAY down on maternal (and infant) frustration, which leads to lower attrition rates.

  • Jun 23

    The last two nurses I hired into our L&D unit actually took the time to seek me out in my office, introduce themselves, and tell me that they were interested in working in my unit. Both times I didn't have any openings at the time, but I remembered their names, and when openings came up, I encouraged them to apply.

    I like people who take the initiative and show that they're truly interested in the unit.

  • Jun 22

    The last two nurses I hired into our L&D unit actually took the time to seek me out in my office, introduce themselves, and tell me that they were interested in working in my unit. Both times I didn't have any openings at the time, but I remembered their names, and when openings came up, I encouraged them to apply.

    I like people who take the initiative and show that they're truly interested in the unit.

  • Jun 22

    The last two nurses I hired into our L&D unit actually took the time to seek me out in my office, introduce themselves, and tell me that they were interested in working in my unit. Both times I didn't have any openings at the time, but I remembered their names, and when openings came up, I encouraged them to apply.

    I like people who take the initiative and show that they're truly interested in the unit.

  • Jun 22

    As a hiring manager, I would agree with Caliotter.

  • Jun 21

    Quote from That Guy
    Does anything not offend people these days?
    Nope. You'll always find someone who is offended by something.

  • Jun 21

    Quote from NurseA1987
    I guess I found it most offensive because I felt as though those years of experience were overlooked because I was an LPN.
    Even if you *hadn't* had several years of LPN experience, calling someone a "baby nurse" is insulting and inappropriate.

  • Jun 21

    Quote from NurseA1987
    Just wondering, what do you all think constitutes someone being a "baby nurse"?
    The only nurse I call a "baby nurse" is a nurse who takes care of babies. I think it's an offensive term and contributes to the culture of lateral violence that many hospital units still struggle with.

    I prefer to support our new nurses, appreciate the unique life experiences and fresh knowledge they bring to the table, rather than insult and patronize them.


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