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klone, MSN, RN 71,795 Views

Joined Apr 2, '03 - from 'Oregon'. klone is a L&D. She has '10+' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Women's Health/OB Leadership'. Posts: 11,247 (55% Liked) Likes: 27,208

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  • Mar 26

    When I came into a manager position of a unit with which I had no history, I treated everyone as having a clean slate. Everyone started at square one with regards to disciplinary stuff (although you better believe I read through people's HR files to get a feel for what other managers have dealt with). Become familiar with your facility's progressive discipline policies. Keep an anecdotal file. Document everything.

    One thing I learned in a class I recently took (Crucial Accountability - highly recommend reading the book) is that it's unfair to have coaching conversations based on hearsay or generalized "She has a bad attitude" feedback. In order for it to be fair as well as meaningful, you need to have specific examples of behavior, or you need to have witnessed it firsthand. Otherwise, you need to encourage staff to speak to the problem coworker directly about their behavior. The same goes for her - if she's pouncing on you to complain about others as soon as you walk in, a good response is "And when you talked to Jane about this behavior, how did she respond?" If she says that she didn't talk to Jane about it, let her know that you expect her to address issues with coworkers directly with them, and offer to assist in coaching on how to broach a conversation (I also recommend reading the book Crucial Conversations!).

  • Mar 26

    I'll bite:

    Fluffy.

    E.g. It's hard to keep baby on the monitor because the patient is fluffy.

    Obese. The technical term is OBESE.

  • Mar 25

    When I had a discectomy/laminectomy done, the physician asked me to state what side. I just kind of said "Uh...leftish?"

  • Mar 25

    Quote from calivianya
    I've seen that happen a lot on my unit. I can name at least five people off the top of my head that I know have been forced out because they weren't liked. It's usually new grads who had the unfortunate combination of not being the quickest learners and having a preceptor that wasn't in the "in crowd" at my job.
    If they were still in their probationary period, then often time that is the ONLY time someone can be let go without out significant documentation. If there is an inkling that a nurse is not going to work out, it's often the best choice to let them go.

    And I think social issues is nearly as valid a reason as performance issues. If a nurse doesn't fit with the culture of a unit, it's going to interfere with teamwork and unit morale.

  • Mar 25

    This is a systemic problem. EDs everywhere are incredibly understaffed, both nurses and providers. It's a national issue that has reached crisis levels.

  • Mar 25

    This is a systemic problem. EDs everywhere are incredibly understaffed, both nurses and providers. It's a national issue that has reached crisis levels.

  • Mar 24

    This is a systemic problem. EDs everywhere are incredibly understaffed, both nurses and providers. It's a national issue that has reached crisis levels.

  • Mar 24

    This is a systemic problem. EDs everywhere are incredibly understaffed, both nurses and providers. It's a national issue that has reached crisis levels.

  • Mar 24

    I understood you weren't talking about an NP program. The non-clinical DNPs I've seen have had specializations - usually it's organizational leadership. Off the top of my head I can't really think of other specializations that aren't clinical-based.

  • Mar 23

    I don't understand what you mean by "regular DNP" - all DNPs have a focus.

  • Mar 22

    Quote from twinsmom788
    I absolutely cannot wrap my head around this comment. "Injuring or killing" a patient happens when a nurse diverts medications from a patient. I have seen this first hand. Call the police, contact the BON, contact the Board of Health Care Facilities, or what ever it is in your state.
    Not all diversion is a result of taking from a patient. And I'm sorry, but giving a patient one Percocet and keeping one for yourself is not on the same league as what Ruby Vee described.

  • Mar 22

    Do you have the hiring manager's contact information from your last interview? I would email her and inquire.

  • Mar 22

    When I did the RN-BSN program, I had 37 CUs. I took my time and did the minimum 12 CUs per semester, and finished in 18 months. I could easily have done it in 6-12 months, but chose not to. At 12 CUs per term, I was doing school work for about 5 hours/week on average when I was actively working on classes, and there were months at a time when I did nothing. If I had consistently did 5 hours/week, EVERY week, I would have been able to finish in less than 12 months.

  • Mar 22

    Quote from amzyRN
    They push us to give pain meds out like it's an emergency to boost their survey scores .
    They've told you this?

  • Mar 22

    Quote from meanmaryjean
    STABLE requires the demonstration of hands-on skills. In person.
    No it doesn't. You might be confusing it with NRP, that does have a "mega code" component that students are required to perform.


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