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CT Pixie, BSN, RN 24,960 Views

Joined Jan 21, '07 - from 'Southern New England'. CT Pixie is a RN. Posts: 4,312 (42% Liked) Likes: 4,843

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  • Sep 28

    Quote from Pinkmegan
    Love it!!
    Interesting to read that you can have shared rooms in LTC. These a very much frowned upon in the UK.
    All the LTC facilities I've worked in have 95% shared rooms. I did clinicals in one that had 4 patients to a room . Hated those places. The facilities I've worked in have 2 people to a room. Of my 17 rooms on my hall, 15 of those are double beds, only 2 private rooms.

  • Sep 19

    Many of my Alzheimer's and dementia pts 'pick' as if they are picking lint off something. I've also seen it in pts who's health declined and they were heading for the "Celestial Discharge" and right before some of my patients started actively dying.

  • Sep 9

    I work with a person who was born with disfigured fingers. On one hand he has 2 fingers (2 fingers fused together and the other 2 w/the thumb fused making two abnormally large/wide fingers and the don't bend very well, if at all). The other hand has 5 fingers but they aren't shaped in the 'normal' way and are on the smaller side.

    He's a floor nurse and does quite well. So he was able to go through school and obtain employment as a floor nurse. He is capable of doing everything that we nurses with 5 fingers on each hand are able to do. Our patients are elderly and most have lost the 'filter' on their mouths...meaning they say what they feel/see regardless of whether or not it maybe insensitive. I've only heard of one resident who made a nasty comment..something along the lines of "I didn't order seafood, why is a lobster here'. He's made very nasty comments to basically everyone he comes into contact with. One little 'flaw' on a person and he's all over it. So to me he's (the resident) not really treating the nurse any differently than the others, he just saw that nurses flaw and zoned in.

    None of his co-workers feel he is a liability. If there is something he can't do for whatever reason he will seek out assistance and receives it without anyone feeling put out about it.

    Until you try, you will never know if you can or cannot manage some skills. Will patients all be fine with your hand/fingers, probably not but those are the same people who find fault with anyone.

    I wish you the best!

  • Sep 6

    Oh, I did say something to her..it was during graduation AFTER they sent my paperwork to the State for clearence to take the NCLEX and I had my NCLEX test date...

    After I had accepted my diploma, I stopped right in front of her leaned in and I hissed in a hushed tone ..she had better hope and pray I never ran into her in the community because I could not promise her I would not lay her out. Her face was priceless. This was a woman of close to my age (I was 39 and she was only a couple years older than I). I did see her out in the community (we lived in the same general area) looked her dead in the eye. She saw me, spun on her heels and went in the other direction.

    Of course, now thinking about it I really should have reported it. Why I didn't, I'm not sure.

  • Sep 6

    Quote from A&OxNone
    Was anybody on this forum working as a nurse that day? In NY or Washington? Or, even if you weren't there, what did that day mean for the hospital, anywhere in America? It's hard to imagine the world didn't just stand still.

    Stories, anybody?
    I wasn't a nurse at time. But I was a 6 months pregnant EMT for our local volunteer ambulance. We are about 1 hrs drive to NYC (I'm in CT). We (the ambulance) had offered our vehicles and staffing to help with rescue and recovery. We were on standby. Sadly, as we all no, there were only a very few who were rescued. At the time of the actual plane hits, I was working in an office (scheduled to work an EMT shift at 5pm). The owners of the company let all the staff go home as the schools were doing emergency dismissals for kids..and honestly no one at the office could concentrate after watching what happened.

    It was an odd and very errie day. You don't notice how many planes fly overhead until there are NO planes overhead at all. Most schools were closed down, many companies shut down, many people (Including me) worried about those we know who live and work in the area..etc. It was strangely quiet. No matter where you went, people seemed to be talking in hushed tones..even in places you normally wouldn't talk quietly..almost as if everywhere you went you were attending a wake or funeral.


    The world might not have stood still..but in a sense the USA did. We did our jobs but did so in a bit of a fog, maddened and confused by what happened. Scared to death another plane would hit somewhere else, or have some other form of terrorism happen. My town is very close to a several places in CT that could be major targets (places that supply the military with aircraft), we also have the place that makes submarines for the military.

    I pray nothing like that ever happens on our soil again. And MANY MANY MANY thanks to all the soldiers and their families who protect this great Country. I, for one, appreciate all your sacrafices you give so that me and my family and loved ones stay safe!

  • Sep 6

    Oh, I did say something to her..it was during graduation AFTER they sent my paperwork to the State for clearence to take the NCLEX and I had my NCLEX test date...

    After I had accepted my diploma, I stopped right in front of her leaned in and I hissed in a hushed tone ..she had better hope and pray I never ran into her in the community because I could not promise her I would not lay her out. Her face was priceless. This was a woman of close to my age (I was 39 and she was only a couple years older than I). I did see her out in the community (we lived in the same general area) looked her dead in the eye. She saw me, spun on her heels and went in the other direction.

    Of course, now thinking about it I really should have reported it. Why I didn't, I'm not sure.

  • Sep 6

    Quote from Everline
    I'd love to hear the other side of this story. Not that I doubt the OPs interpretation of events. It's just that I sometimes read about people being bullied by clinical instructors and the description of the behavior is just out of this world unacceptable with seemingly little to no reason. I find it very odd and wonder what the instructor would have to say.
    Everline, I used to think somewhat like this. I would always hear fellow students complaining about this CI or that one. Nine times out of ten, I know it was complete hogwash and that the CI was 'all over them' for legit reasons. The students who would complain (it seemed like it was the same ones every clinical) were ones who thought rules didn't apply to them and that they could do whatever they wanted. That is until....it happened to me. Once in LPN school and once in RN school. I was an A student both in lecture and clinical for both programs. I always got raving evaluations and was always told how well I performed in clinicals. It was just these two who for whateve reason decided to put a target on my back.

    what it comes down to is...there ARE CI's who, for whatever reason do go on the attack of some students for no reason at all.

  • Aug 30

    Just re-read my orig reply to this post from 4/22/12...at the time I was in the LPN to RN program.

    Fast forward..graduted the RN program and continued on for my RN to BSN. Still worked full time job (40hrs/wk) and a part time job (24hrs/wk) and graduated cum laude with my BSN this past May.

  • Aug 26

    Just re-read my orig reply to this post from 4/22/12...at the time I was in the LPN to RN program.

    Fast forward..graduted the RN program and continued on for my RN to BSN. Still worked full time job (40hrs/wk) and a part time job (24hrs/wk) and graduated cum laude with my BSN this past May.

  • Aug 24

    I've carried malpractice insurance since I was an LPN student (yes students can be sued for things done during clinicals). Once licensed as an LPN, I kept it. I'm currently set to graduate with my ADN in May and once I take and pass the NCLEX I'll change my insurance from LPN coverage to RN.

    Why? No one is going to get my back other than me when the dookey hits the fan.

  • Aug 17

    Just re-read my orig reply to this post from 4/22/12...at the time I was in the LPN to RN program.

    Fast forward..graduted the RN program and continued on for my RN to BSN. Still worked full time job (40hrs/wk) and a part time job (24hrs/wk) and graduated cum laude with my BSN this past May.

  • Aug 16

    Working LTC I've seen this often. One patient and her family stand out. The husband would not leave her side for a couple of days. His children, grandchildren and I all pleaded with him to go with them to their house (literally 2 minutes away) if to do nothing else but to shower, change and brush his teeth.

    Thankfully, he agreed to do just that. He came back and she was still with us which made him realize that his leaving would not cause or stop her from going. The family all gathered around again and then later left. The husband stayed behind. He told me he was running down to the vending machine downstairs and that he'd be right back while the CNA's tended to the patient. It was no sooner than the elevator doors closed that the CNA came to me and said the patient had passed. I know she was waiting for him to leave.

    And then there were those (my own grandmother included) who hung on until every one of their loved ones that they held close and dear were 'home' with them. My grandmother was 'waiting' for her son. Calling for him frequently. (her grandchildren had all come to the house, some of us flew into be there, her daughters and husband was there). My uncle was a long distance trucker and was on the road when my gram declined and was close to death. We did not want to call him and have him drive like a maniac trying to get home before she passed, knowing that could lead to more tragedy. Gram hung on....we all prayed she'd let go. Then it dawned on me, she was waiting for her son. I told my grampa, the next time she calls for him, you go in and just tell her 'you' are there (acting as the son). She was in and out of consciousness and when she finally called her her son my grandfather went in and said, its ok mom, i'm here. You could actually see a change in her, it was as if she relaxed and were at peace. Five minutes after my grandfather did that, she took her last breath. I don't care what anyone says, I 100% believe she was waiting to pass until her family was ALL there.

  • Aug 15

    A cool way we were taught to convert from units of say grams to milligrams etc was this:

    First you have to know bigger to smaller measurements for example:
    Kilos, grams, milligrams, micrograms.

    Then are you converting from larger to smaller? Think of the L in Larger..the bottom part of the L is pointing you in the direction the decimal place must move. For each measurement you are moving you move the decimal point 3 places. Going from kilograms to milligrams..you are going from a Larger measurement to a smaller one so the L is pointing you in the correct direction (to the right). Ok, so now you know which way the decimal is going..now you need to know how many times you must move it. Kilos to grams (3 places) grams to milligrams (3 places) now you know you are moving the decimal in the kilo measurement 6 places to the right.

    The same can be done for converting smaller measurement to larger ones. The S in smaller also points you in the direction you are to move the decimal point..to the Left (see where the bottom part of the s is going..to the left). Then again, you figure how many spots to move it. Volia' your done.

    You do have to memorize the basic measurements from Larger to smaller k, g, mg, mcg..and so on.

    To remember grains to milligrams think of a clock. 15mg is 1/4 grain, 30 mg is 1/2grain, 45mg is 3/4grains and 60mg is 1 grain. 15 minutes after is quarter after, 30 minutes is 1/2 hour, 45 minutes is 3/4' of an hour and 60 minutes is 1 hour.

    When ever I have conversion tests I always put the L and S at the top of the page, write down the order the measurements go larger to smaller and I put a clock on the paper marked with the 1/4hr, 1/2hr, 3/4hr and 1hr and inside put the corresponding conversion...

    Hope all that babbling helped some.

  • Aug 12

    A month before I turned 38 I started my LPN schooling. Graduated a couple months after turning 39.

    At 42 I started the years worth of pre-reqs for the LPN to RN bridge, and at 44 I graduated with my ADN.

    In a couple of weeks my first classes for the ADN to BSN begin at 44 1/2 years old to the day.

  • Aug 12

    A month before I turned 38 I started my LPN schooling. Graduated a couple months after turning 39.

    At 42 I started the years worth of pre-reqs for the LPN to RN bridge, and at 44 I graduated with my ADN.

    In a couple of weeks my first classes for the ADN to BSN begin at 44 1/2 years old to the day.


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