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CT Pixie, BSN, RN 23,808 Views

Joined Jan 21, '07 - from 'Southern New England'. CT Pixie is a RN. Posts: 4,309 (42% Liked) Likes: 4,823

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  • Jul 24

    I was a month from turning 38 when I started my LPN schooling.
    I was 42 when I started my pre-reqs and other courses for my LPN to RN program.
    I was 44 when I started my RN to BSN.

    I turned 47 a month before getting my BSN.

    You're going to be 30 anyway. Do you want to 30 with no degree and/or license OR you do you want to turn 30 with a degree and/or license. The choice is yours

  • Jul 23

    I was a month from turning 38 when I started my LPN schooling.
    I was 42 when I started my pre-reqs and other courses for my LPN to RN program.
    I was 44 when I started my RN to BSN.

    I turned 47 a month before getting my BSN.

    You're going to be 30 anyway. Do you want to 30 with no degree and/or license OR you do you want to turn 30 with a degree and/or license. The choice is yours

  • Jul 23

    I was a month from turning 38 when I started my LPN schooling.
    I was 42 when I started my pre-reqs and other courses for my LPN to RN program.
    I was 44 when I started my RN to BSN.

    I turned 47 a month before getting my BSN.

    You're going to be 30 anyway. Do you want to 30 with no degree and/or license OR you do you want to turn 30 with a degree and/or license. The choice is yours

  • Jul 21

    I went to LPN school when one daughter had just turned 15 and the other had just turned 6. I worked full time from home and had a very supportive husband

    It can be done but you have to learn organization and learn what takes priority and when. And don't ignore the family!

    My husband picked up more of the household chores than he usually did which really helped. Both my daughters were very excited that their Mom was going to school.

    In order to help my little one with reading (at the age of 6 she was reading at a 4th grade level!) she would sit on my lap as I read chapters. She would read to me from my book and I'd read to her. That kid learned the pathway of the blood through the heart before I got it down pat . She liked being with me and felt like a big girl helping momma with her homework. The older one would quiz me before tests etc. The hubby did everything he could to help me study.

    Don't leave things for last minute. If I had spare time, I always tried to read ahead or do homework that wasn't due then but was coming up. That way I was always ahead of schedule. I think it was easier to do things because I knew I had this day and time to get this or that done and if it didn't get done, I was up a creek b/c there was no other time frame. I had a way I organized things on certain days I did certain things. If you will be the one cooking, take a good chunk of time to cook for the week and freeze it. I used doing laundry as a 'timer' for studying. I'd throw a load of wash in and begin reading, when the washer chimed it was done I'd stop reading/studying and go put it in the dryer..get a drink, stretch and go back. When it was time to take the clothes out I'd fold them somewhere I could lay my book out and read as I folded clothes. Washing dishes I'd put my notes up on the window sill in front of the sink and study/read as I washed dishes. Multitasking while doing 'mindless' things such as folding clothes or washing.

    Find ways to include your children in your education. You will be a great roll model to them showing the that education is important.

    I graduated w/high honors and my husband and daughers sat beaming in the audience.

    I worked as an LPN for 3 yrs and then went to my LPN to RN program. Because I never really stopped taking classes my family was use to the whole routine and it made it much easier when I went into the RN program. Again, kids and hubby did all they could to help me and they earned that dipolma as much as i did.

    Best of luck

  • Jul 17

    A month before I turned 38 I started my LPN schooling. Graduated a couple months after turning 39.

    At 42 I started the years worth of pre-reqs for the LPN to RN bridge, and at 44 I graduated with my ADN.

    In a couple of weeks my first classes for the ADN to BSN begin at 44 1/2 years old to the day.

  • Jul 15

    Just re-read my orig reply to this post from 4/22/12...at the time I was in the LPN to RN program.

    Fast forward..graduted the RN program and continued on for my RN to BSN. Still worked full time job (40hrs/wk) and a part time job (24hrs/wk) and graduated cum laude with my BSN this past May.

  • Jul 14

    Just re-read my orig reply to this post from 4/22/12...at the time I was in the LPN to RN program.

    Fast forward..graduted the RN program and continued on for my RN to BSN. Still worked full time job (40hrs/wk) and a part time job (24hrs/wk) and graduated cum laude with my BSN this past May.

  • Jul 14

    I entered LPN school a month before I turned 38, marrie,d 2 kids, full time job, school was also full time M-F 7a-330p (none of the traditional college 'breaks' or vacations, we went straight through from Mar 2007 thru June 2008). Hubby was 100% behind me and supported me the entire time, as did my daughters. Everyone pitched in to help ease the burdon of the house chores, laundry, dinner etc.

    I graduated 15 months later with high honors. Passed my NCLEX on the first attempt and had landed my 1st job even before scheduling my NCLEX.

    Now I am 43 (my birthday was last week), I'm in my LPN to RN bridge, still working full time, in school just a credit shy of whats considered 'full time'. My lowest grades are in the high B+ range and my highest are A+. Husband is still my biggest cheerleader and support system.

    I think a lot of being successful in working full time and going to school is having tip-top organizational skills. And you need to be self-disciplined enough to do what you have to do, when you have to do it. You need to know what has to be done and by when and know how to prioritize accordingly.

    While working full time and going to school full time (with or without children) is difficult, its not impossible.

  • Jul 6

    Can't remember what show it was (Grey's perhaps) and the person had an IV. Except it was the drip chamber taped to the arm and it was pointing in the wrong direction.

    Before I could say anything, my youngest daughter grabbed the remote, backed it up to the scene again, paused it and screams...'what FOOL inserted the iv spike into the person and in the wrong direction?!?! Maaaa! Can you believe how stupid these people think we are!"

  • Jul 1

    Quote from PinayUSA
    FYI - I do not work in the HealthCare profession. I was reading Texas Forum and all it about is getting into a Community college for a 2 year nursing degrees.

    A 2 year Community College is like going to High School but just a tad bit harder, It not like going to a average 4 year college where the course are tougher.
    Did you REALLY just say this?! I don't know where you were educated nor will I assume. However, you are completely off base with the statement I have placed in bold. Community College courses are not 'just a tad bit harder' than high school. If they were, the 4 year colleges would NOT take any community college credits as transfer credits. My community college courses were taught by professors who also taught at the 4 years colleges. The curriculum for their community college courses were just as intense as the ones taught at the 4 year colleges. The differenes between the ADN (2 year) and BSN (4 year) is only of amount of courses.

    Do you really think a community college professor (many of which also teach at 4 year colleges) are told not to teach the students X, Y and Z because they are only at the community college and not at the 4 year college and that it would be to tough for the students?? You get the same information in a community college course (English Comp, A&P, Micro, Nursing 101 etc as you do in a 4 year college..just for WAY less money.

  • Jun 28

    [QUOTE=ixchel;9099086]Aerosmith - Back in the Saddle - YouTube

    I don't know how to make my pool water clear.

    /QUOTE]
    We were having a big problem trying to get our pool clear one year. If it was clear it was an 'off' color, it it were the right color it had a foggy look to the water.

    Finally went to the local pool supply store and they told us to bring a sample of the water. Which we did. They ran an analysis on the water and were able to tell what was off about it. Threw the needed chemicals in it and the pool was nice and clear.

  • Jun 25

    There are only 4 hospitals in the state that are magnet (see the box below. It give the name and when they got magnet status). There are many hospitals that hire ADNs. My hospital is part of Yale. We still hire ADN nurses however, an ADN nurse will only be considered if they have proof currently enrolled in a BSN or higher program at the time of the application. Other hospitals don't have that requirement but do require that you will enroll in a BSN or higher within a certain period of time after being hired and will complete the degree within a certain amount of years after hire. St Vincen'ts is a magnet hospital, but even they do not only hire BSN. They have the stipulation that you will enroll and complete your BSN within a certain time frame.

    ADNs are still hired pretty much everywhere. However my best suggestion to all entering nursing..just do the BSN. If you can't for whatever reason, do the ADN and be prepared to go back for the BSN.

    BRISTOL HOSPITAL BRISTOL CT [FONT=Arial]2015[/FONT]
    Middlesex Hospital Middletown CT [FONT=Arial]2001[/FONT]
    St. Vincent's Medical Center Bridgeport CT [FONT=Arial]2012[/FONT]
    Yale-New Haven Hospital New Haven CT [FONT=Arial]2011[/FONT]

  • Jun 24

    If your ultimate goal is to become an RN then of the 3 you only have 1 choice.

    #2 won't work because all the RT schools around here require a certain GPA and while its shows a low min GPA, its also competitive and that low min GPA won't cut it in order to get into the programs. Most colleges/uni show a lower min GPA as a requirement however, they tend to take from higher GPAs than the minimum.

    #3 won't work because becoming a CNA won't do anything to change your GPA. If your GPA didn't cut it for this time when you applied, becoming a CNA and reapplying at a later date doesn't change the fact that your GPA is too low.

    If you really want to become a nurse you have to get your GPA up. That means going back and redoing classes you did poorly in.

  • Jun 23

    If your ultimate goal is to become an RN then of the 3 you only have 1 choice.

    #2 won't work because all the RT schools around here require a certain GPA and while its shows a low min GPA, its also competitive and that low min GPA won't cut it in order to get into the programs. Most colleges/uni show a lower min GPA as a requirement however, they tend to take from higher GPAs than the minimum.

    #3 won't work because becoming a CNA won't do anything to change your GPA. If your GPA didn't cut it for this time when you applied, becoming a CNA and reapplying at a later date doesn't change the fact that your GPA is too low.

    If you really want to become a nurse you have to get your GPA up. That means going back and redoing classes you did poorly in.

  • Jun 20

    Quote from darobow
    Hi I hear nursing students talk about the NCLEX test quite a bit would anyone care to shed some light on it?
    Is it similar to the NREMT exam? In terms of grading or what...?
    Do you know your results right away?
    Is it the test that you take at the end for your license?
    What does NCLEX stand for?
    I'm just an outsider looking in.
    1. Is it similar to the NREMT exam? In terms of grading or what...?
    I've taken the NREMT and the NCLEX. They are similar in the sense that they are both testing to see your competency. They are both multiple choice. I took the NREMT back in 2001 and back then it was paper and pencil. Not sure how its done now. But the NCLEX is a computer test. If I remember correctly the NREMT was a pass or fail test. The NCLEX is also pass or fail. There is no number or letter grade given.

    2 Do you know your results right away?

    NCLEX does give the option of getting 'quick results'. That is where you are able to access your pass/fail results in 48 hours of taking the test. This is only the case if the State in which you took the exam participates. If not, then you have to wait until the BON posts your license number online or wait for the official results via snail mail.

    3. Is it the test that you take at the end for your license?
    Yes. You take the NCLEX-PN after you complete Practical Nursing schooling and the NCLEX-RN after you complete a registered nursing program.

    4. What does NCLEX stand for?
    NCLEX
    (National Council Licensure Examination)

    Here is the website for official NCLEX information -->NCLEX & Other Exams | NCSBN


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