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CT Pixie, BSN, RN 26,008 Views

Joined Jan 21, '07 - from 'Southern New England'. CT Pixie is a RN. Posts: 4,313 (42% Liked) Likes: 4,852

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  • Nov 19

    I went to LPN school when one daughter had just turned 15 and the other had just turned 6. I worked full time from home and had a very supportive husband

    It can be done but you have to learn organization and learn what takes priority and when. And don't ignore the family!

    My husband picked up more of the household chores than he usually did which really helped. Both my daughters were very excited that their Mom was going to school.

    In order to help my little one with reading (at the age of 6 she was reading at a 4th grade level!) she would sit on my lap as I read chapters. She would read to me from my book and I'd read to her. That kid learned the pathway of the blood through the heart before I got it down pat . She liked being with me and felt like a big girl helping momma with her homework. The older one would quiz me before tests etc. The hubby did everything he could to help me study.

    Don't leave things for last minute. If I had spare time, I always tried to read ahead or do homework that wasn't due then but was coming up. That way I was always ahead of schedule. I think it was easier to do things because I knew I had this day and time to get this or that done and if it didn't get done, I was up a creek b/c there was no other time frame. I had a way I organized things on certain days I did certain things. If you will be the one cooking, take a good chunk of time to cook for the week and freeze it. I used doing laundry as a 'timer' for studying. I'd throw a load of wash in and begin reading, when the washer chimed it was done I'd stop reading/studying and go put it in the dryer..get a drink, stretch and go back. When it was time to take the clothes out I'd fold them somewhere I could lay my book out and read as I folded clothes. Washing dishes I'd put my notes up on the window sill in front of the sink and study/read as I washed dishes. Multitasking while doing 'mindless' things such as folding clothes or washing.

    Find ways to include your children in your education. You will be a great roll model to them showing the that education is important.

    I graduated w/high honors and my husband and daughers sat beaming in the audience.

    I worked as an LPN for 3 yrs and then went to my LPN to RN program. Because I never really stopped taking classes my family was use to the whole routine and it made it much easier when I went into the RN program. Again, kids and hubby did all they could to help me and they earned that dipolma as much as i did.

    Best of luck

  • Nov 16

    Quote from morte
    what is the reason for waiting to have someone take your cell phone OUT of the bag?? for that matter, why put it in one , in the firstn place??
    That's the newest NCLEX RN/PN thing. They require all cell phones be placed in a sealed plastic type thing. (not see through). You hand your phone to the person as you are registered in, they place the phone in the bag and seal it. You then place it in the locker you are assigned to. Once your test is over and you go through the palm scan etc, you go back out to where the lobby area is (where the lockers are and where you first came in) and get your things out, you then have the pearsonvue employee unseal the bag and retrieve your phone.

    The reason? People come up with ingenuious ways to cheat. I'm sure more than one person had their cell phone and used it during a break/bathroom etc to either call someone just to have an innocent chit chat or to use the phone to do a really quick review of info.

    the reason to wait for the person to take the phone out of the sealed bag...because they tell you to. simple as that.

  • Nov 12

    I was a month from turning 38 when I started my LPN schooling.
    I was 42 when I started my pre-reqs and other courses for my LPN to RN program.
    I was 44 when I started my RN to BSN.

    I turned 47 a month before getting my BSN.

    You're going to be 30 anyway. Do you want to 30 with no degree and/or license OR you do you want to turn 30 with a degree and/or license. The choice is yours

  • Oct 20

    A month before I turned 38 I started my LPN schooling. Graduated a couple months after turning 39.

    At 42 I started the years worth of pre-reqs for the LPN to RN bridge, and at 44 I graduated with my ADN.

    In a couple of weeks my first classes for the ADN to BSN begin at 44 1/2 years old to the day.

  • Oct 17

    Quote from Pinkmegan
    Love it!!
    Interesting to read that you can have shared rooms in LTC. These a very much frowned upon in the UK.
    All the LTC facilities I've worked in have 95% shared rooms. I did clinicals in one that had 4 patients to a room . Hated those places. The facilities I've worked in have 2 people to a room. Of my 17 rooms on my hall, 15 of those are double beds, only 2 private rooms.

  • Oct 15

    I'm a LTAC/LTC LPN and damn proud of it. Yes, when I answer the standard question of "what hospital do you work at" when someone finds out I'm a nurse with "I don't work at the hospital, I work at a LTC facility" more often than not, I am met with the look of disgust and the 'ohh, ok'. Just once I'd love for those people to shadow me at work for a week, hell, I'll take a day.

    And maybe then they will see that I'm not 'wasting' my education or skills, I'm not JUST a boo-boo kisser and band-aid applier. My residents for the majority have very complex and sometimes more acute than chronic issues. My short-stay residents are those poor souls who have basically been kicked out of the hospital because the insurance company/TPTB or whomever decided that they can't stay any longer. Much too sick and unable to go home without 24/7 SKILLED nursing, they are shuttled off to me. Where I get to take care of the much too ill person with my limited resources and much too often to my own accord.

    I/we do what we can with what we have. We don't have this specialist and that one to consult with or have our questions answered like the nurses in the hospitals. And yet we are thought of by the 'hierarchy' of the nursing totem pole as brainless nurses who probably work in LTC because we can't cut 'real nursing'. That patient you just had on your floor that required a lot of your time and nursing know how, the one who was discharged earlier..well I have them..and around 30 others just like them. I challange YOU to do my job for a day

  • Oct 13

    Quote from Franemtnurse
    It makes me wonder how many were actually buried alive.
    and thats the EXACT reason we now have the old saying "saved by the bell" and "graveyard shift" . Way back when, many people were buried alive. In an attempt to "save" the people if they happened to come to when in the coffin in the ground, a string was put in their hand, the string was then threaded in some way to come out of the ground and attach to a bell. That way, if they weren't dead and came to, they could ring the bell to alert people they were alive (saved by the bell). The people who would watch and wait..."the graveyard shift"

  • Oct 9

    Can't remember what show it was (Grey's perhaps) and the person had an IV. Except it was the drip chamber taped to the arm and it was pointing in the wrong direction.

    Before I could say anything, my youngest daughter grabbed the remote, backed it up to the scene again, paused it and screams...'what FOOL inserted the iv spike into the person and in the wrong direction?!?! Maaaa! Can you believe how stupid these people think we are!"

  • Oct 2

    My mother and sister slaughter the English language! Both say:
    Mind-grain for migraine
    tide-n-all for tylenol

    they drive around the curb but they park at the curve (I and most people I know drive around the curve and park at the curb)

    My sister says supposaBly
    My mom is notorious for saying pacific for specific
    Both say die-ah-rear for diarrhea
    Prostrate for prostate

    What drives me insane reading posts here sometimes is the incorrect placement of an apostrophe. It's not did'nt, should'nt, could'nt or would'nt!

    One other that isn't a mispronunciation but still drives me batty (my best friend and her family tend to say this..maybe its a regional thing they are from Maine) "When I was pregnant for Jennifer I had terrible heartburn "(her daughter) ummm unless you were carrying Jennifer's baby you were pregnant WITH Jennifer!

  • Sep 28

    Quote from Pinkmegan
    Love it!!
    Interesting to read that you can have shared rooms in LTC. These a very much frowned upon in the UK.
    All the LTC facilities I've worked in have 95% shared rooms. I did clinicals in one that had 4 patients to a room . Hated those places. The facilities I've worked in have 2 people to a room. Of my 17 rooms on my hall, 15 of those are double beds, only 2 private rooms.

  • Sep 19

    Many of my Alzheimer's and dementia pts 'pick' as if they are picking lint off something. I've also seen it in pts who's health declined and they were heading for the "Celestial Discharge" and right before some of my patients started actively dying.

  • Sep 9

    I work with a person who was born with disfigured fingers. On one hand he has 2 fingers (2 fingers fused together and the other 2 w/the thumb fused making two abnormally large/wide fingers and the don't bend very well, if at all). The other hand has 5 fingers but they aren't shaped in the 'normal' way and are on the smaller side.

    He's a floor nurse and does quite well. So he was able to go through school and obtain employment as a floor nurse. He is capable of doing everything that we nurses with 5 fingers on each hand are able to do. Our patients are elderly and most have lost the 'filter' on their mouths...meaning they say what they feel/see regardless of whether or not it maybe insensitive. I've only heard of one resident who made a nasty comment..something along the lines of "I didn't order seafood, why is a lobster here'. He's made very nasty comments to basically everyone he comes into contact with. One little 'flaw' on a person and he's all over it. So to me he's (the resident) not really treating the nurse any differently than the others, he just saw that nurses flaw and zoned in.

    None of his co-workers feel he is a liability. If there is something he can't do for whatever reason he will seek out assistance and receives it without anyone feeling put out about it.

    Until you try, you will never know if you can or cannot manage some skills. Will patients all be fine with your hand/fingers, probably not but those are the same people who find fault with anyone.

    I wish you the best!

  • Sep 6

    Oh, I did say something to her..it was during graduation AFTER they sent my paperwork to the State for clearence to take the NCLEX and I had my NCLEX test date...

    After I had accepted my diploma, I stopped right in front of her leaned in and I hissed in a hushed tone ..she had better hope and pray I never ran into her in the community because I could not promise her I would not lay her out. Her face was priceless. This was a woman of close to my age (I was 39 and she was only a couple years older than I). I did see her out in the community (we lived in the same general area) looked her dead in the eye. She saw me, spun on her heels and went in the other direction.

    Of course, now thinking about it I really should have reported it. Why I didn't, I'm not sure.

  • Sep 6

    Quote from A&OxNone
    Was anybody on this forum working as a nurse that day? In NY or Washington? Or, even if you weren't there, what did that day mean for the hospital, anywhere in America? It's hard to imagine the world didn't just stand still.

    Stories, anybody?
    I wasn't a nurse at time. But I was a 6 months pregnant EMT for our local volunteer ambulance. We are about 1 hrs drive to NYC (I'm in CT). We (the ambulance) had offered our vehicles and staffing to help with rescue and recovery. We were on standby. Sadly, as we all no, there were only a very few who were rescued. At the time of the actual plane hits, I was working in an office (scheduled to work an EMT shift at 5pm). The owners of the company let all the staff go home as the schools were doing emergency dismissals for kids..and honestly no one at the office could concentrate after watching what happened.

    It was an odd and very errie day. You don't notice how many planes fly overhead until there are NO planes overhead at all. Most schools were closed down, many companies shut down, many people (Including me) worried about those we know who live and work in the area..etc. It was strangely quiet. No matter where you went, people seemed to be talking in hushed tones..even in places you normally wouldn't talk quietly..almost as if everywhere you went you were attending a wake or funeral.


    The world might not have stood still..but in a sense the USA did. We did our jobs but did so in a bit of a fog, maddened and confused by what happened. Scared to death another plane would hit somewhere else, or have some other form of terrorism happen. My town is very close to a several places in CT that could be major targets (places that supply the military with aircraft), we also have the place that makes submarines for the military.

    I pray nothing like that ever happens on our soil again. And MANY MANY MANY thanks to all the soldiers and their families who protect this great Country. I, for one, appreciate all your sacrafices you give so that me and my family and loved ones stay safe!

  • Sep 6

    Oh, I did say something to her..it was during graduation AFTER they sent my paperwork to the State for clearence to take the NCLEX and I had my NCLEX test date...

    After I had accepted my diploma, I stopped right in front of her leaned in and I hissed in a hushed tone ..she had better hope and pray I never ran into her in the community because I could not promise her I would not lay her out. Her face was priceless. This was a woman of close to my age (I was 39 and she was only a couple years older than I). I did see her out in the community (we lived in the same general area) looked her dead in the eye. She saw me, spun on her heels and went in the other direction.

    Of course, now thinking about it I really should have reported it. Why I didn't, I'm not sure.


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