Latest Likes For EricJRN

Latest Likes For EricJRN

EricJRN 19,514 Views

Joined Nov 25, '05 - from 'Texas'. EricJRN is a Nurse Educator. He has '10' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'NICU'. Posts: 8,734 (11% Liked) Likes: 1,665

Sorted By Last Like Received (Max 500)
  • Jul 19

    Quote from blessed02
    Everybody says its to prevent fluid overload but iam not satisfied with this answer.
    An inquisitive mind is an excellent quality! It may not seem to make a lot of sense to expect fluid volume excess with the volumes that you are administering. However, a patient receiving blood products is more likely to develop FVE because of the high osmotic load of the blood products.

    High osmotic load basically means that you have a high electrolyte concentration, in part due to normal constituents of human blood and partly due to additives like sodium-containing anticoagulants added to donated products. Since water follows salt, IV infusions of this type of product will draw fluid into the intravascular space and predispose them to fluid volume excess more quickly than we might expect.

  • Jul 15

    First of all, you will run across a few "recruiters" who are looking to wheel and deal you into going to their school.
    admissionsRep,

    Believe it or not, we even run into wheelers and dealers here on Allnurses. Sometimes we're skeptical when people come to the site representing a certain school or product, but it sounds like you're open to discussion of some doubts I have after reading this post.

    The school I work for offers the Medical Assitant Sciences program, which when completed, will certify you as a Medical Assistant.
    Nursing programs definitely cannot make similar claims, as RN or LPN/LVN licensure requires that the student pass a rigorous exam even after completing the degree. I thought that the same was true for CMA or RMA certification though.

    Schools such as the one I work for, offers you an Associates Degree in Specialized Business, which is always much higher than a diploma or certificate.
    I think this is a great stretch. In fact, when I worked as a medical assistant in multiple clinics prior to my nursing career, I found just the opposite to be true. Take two students who start MA training at the same time. Student A gets a diploma and goes into the workforce for several months while Student B is still in school working on the AAS. If both applied to our clinic, the experienced non-degreed student would get that job just about every time.

    Basically, you can earn your LPN licensing in about a year, and RN in a little over 2.
    This is some good information. Many students need to hear it, because most are currently finding that it takes at least a year to complete prerequisites, whether for LPN/LVN or RN. However, I can flip open the paper any day of the week and find MA programs graduating students in six to seven months.

    If you've heard of a CMA or LPN or RN, you've heard of obtaining your BSN then. Basically, that is the top of the line in Nursing today.
    Nurses are currently being educated up to the doctoral level. A minimum of an MSN is generally required for entry into advanced practice, one of the most common forms of advancement in nursing today.

    There is a prestigious private institution here in PA called Alvernia College that has a BSN program and accepts our MA students in at JUNIOR STATUS!
    There are eighty-four approved RN programs in PA, but less than 10% of those programs had lower NCLEX pass rates than Alvernia College did during the last reporting period (10/06 to 9/07). I understand that program quality can be a matter of opinion, but would prestigious be a little bit of a stretch?

    Please understand that our members appreciate unique viewpoints. We're just constantly on the lookout for potential misunderstandings or inaccuracies, as this information can literally change the course of a member's career.

  • Apr 25

    I'll echo what the others have said: More listening, less talking is the way to go. You might say something like, "Looks like you're having a pretty rough time (rough day, etc)." Usually they'll take it from there and talk to you if they're ready.

  • Apr 18

    Quote from shhnay80
    Well.. all my nursing instructors told me that your computer shutting off at 85 is usually a good sign.. you need at least 75 questions right and the other 10 are usually free. My and my 2 of my friends computer shut off at 85 and we all passed.
    A lot of nursing instructors have a surprisingly poor understanding of how the NCLEX works. This is a good example of it.

    On the NCLEX, both passers and failers tend to score around 50%. What determines pass/fail is the difficulty level of those questions where you're hitting that 50% mark. Do they have to give you really hard ones or really easy ones? That's the determining factor.

    Jcarro, 'select all that apply' questions are generally considered to be harder, which is good news for you. Good luck on your results. Let us know how it turns out.

  • Apr 17

    I'm sure a lot of us get nervous around adult emergencies, but just about any nurse is going to be a little out of their element during a community emergency. Other than basics like calling for help, keeping an airway open, direct pressure for bleeding, compressions and maybe an AED, you're not likely to have the equipment to do anything else. In most situations, additional equipment is going to arrive at the same time as the personnel who are trained to operate it.

  • Apr 17

    I'm sure a lot of us get nervous around adult emergencies, but just about any nurse is going to be a little out of their element during a community emergency. Other than basics like calling for help, keeping an airway open, direct pressure for bleeding, compressions and maybe an AED, you're not likely to have the equipment to do anything else. In most situations, additional equipment is going to arrive at the same time as the personnel who are trained to operate it.

  • Apr 17

    I'm sure a lot of us get nervous around adult emergencies, but just about any nurse is going to be a little out of their element during a community emergency. Other than basics like calling for help, keeping an airway open, direct pressure for bleeding, compressions and maybe an AED, you're not likely to have the equipment to do anything else. In most situations, additional equipment is going to arrive at the same time as the personnel who are trained to operate it.

  • Apr 17

    I'm sure a lot of us get nervous around adult emergencies, but just about any nurse is going to be a little out of their element during a community emergency. Other than basics like calling for help, keeping an airway open, direct pressure for bleeding, compressions and maybe an AED, you're not likely to have the equipment to do anything else. In most situations, additional equipment is going to arrive at the same time as the personnel who are trained to operate it.

  • Apr 16

    Yep - most people don't really want to know the details.

    "So you work in the happy place with all the babies?"
    "Uh huh, sure. That's me."

  • Mar 17

    Welcome, Maicor! Enjoy the discussions. Feel free to ask questions!

  • Mar 13

    Out of curiosity, what is the pharmacology behind using Narcan to reduce fever?

  • Feb 12

    EC grads,

    Post your year of graduation and your specialty/specialties. I'll go first:

    I've been a Level II/III Neonatal ICU nurse since graduation in January '06.


    Update 10/2015: I've worked for a large Level IV NICU since 2009, where I've had both bedside and staff development educator roles. Although I just finished a master's degree in nursing education (from EC), I am currently enjoying a role as a bedside nurse. I'm considering more school - trying to decide between the nurse practitioner route or the Ph.D./tenure-track faculty route.

  • Jan 3

    I haven't worked with intubated adults in some time, but I don't think that my employer or my insurance carrier would be too stoked about a staff nurse reintroducing an displaced ET tube. I'd go with option A - bag and call for help.

  • Nov 24 '15

    It's not outdated, but I think one confusing thing is that it has been deemphasized in NRP for many years. (Bicarb was a standard code drug for a long time, but now it's known that in coding neonates, there is usually respiratory acidosis, and bicarb will just raise the pCO2 and lower the pH in that situation.)

    In metabolic acidosis, bicarb is still often indicated, but it's also important to look at correctable causes of metabolic acidosis, like whether the baby is cold, fluid-depleted or perfusing poorly.

  • Nov 12 '15

    It's not outdated, but I think one confusing thing is that it has been deemphasized in NRP for many years. (Bicarb was a standard code drug for a long time, but now it's known that in coding neonates, there is usually respiratory acidosis, and bicarb will just raise the pCO2 and lower the pH in that situation.)

    In metabolic acidosis, bicarb is still often indicated, but it's also important to look at correctable causes of metabolic acidosis, like whether the baby is cold, fluid-depleted or perfusing poorly.


close
close