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EricJRN 19,230 Views

Joined Nov 25, '05 - from 'Texas'. EricJRN is a Nurse Educator. He has '10' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'NICU'. Posts: 8,733 (11% Liked) Likes: 1,663

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  • Apr 25

    I'll echo what the others have said: More listening, less talking is the way to go. You might say something like, "Looks like you're having a pretty rough time (rough day, etc)." Usually they'll take it from there and talk to you if they're ready.

  • Apr 18

    Quote from shhnay80
    Well.. all my nursing instructors told me that your computer shutting off at 85 is usually a good sign.. you need at least 75 questions right and the other 10 are usually free. My and my 2 of my friends computer shut off at 85 and we all passed.
    A lot of nursing instructors have a surprisingly poor understanding of how the NCLEX works. This is a good example of it.

    On the NCLEX, both passers and failers tend to score around 50%. What determines pass/fail is the difficulty level of those questions where you're hitting that 50% mark. Do they have to give you really hard ones or really easy ones? That's the determining factor.

    Jcarro, 'select all that apply' questions are generally considered to be harder, which is good news for you. Good luck on your results. Let us know how it turns out.

  • Apr 17

    I'm sure a lot of us get nervous around adult emergencies, but just about any nurse is going to be a little out of their element during a community emergency. Other than basics like calling for help, keeping an airway open, direct pressure for bleeding, compressions and maybe an AED, you're not likely to have the equipment to do anything else. In most situations, additional equipment is going to arrive at the same time as the personnel who are trained to operate it.

  • Apr 17

    I'm sure a lot of us get nervous around adult emergencies, but just about any nurse is going to be a little out of their element during a community emergency. Other than basics like calling for help, keeping an airway open, direct pressure for bleeding, compressions and maybe an AED, you're not likely to have the equipment to do anything else. In most situations, additional equipment is going to arrive at the same time as the personnel who are trained to operate it.

  • Apr 17

    I'm sure a lot of us get nervous around adult emergencies, but just about any nurse is going to be a little out of their element during a community emergency. Other than basics like calling for help, keeping an airway open, direct pressure for bleeding, compressions and maybe an AED, you're not likely to have the equipment to do anything else. In most situations, additional equipment is going to arrive at the same time as the personnel who are trained to operate it.

  • Apr 17

    I'm sure a lot of us get nervous around adult emergencies, but just about any nurse is going to be a little out of their element during a community emergency. Other than basics like calling for help, keeping an airway open, direct pressure for bleeding, compressions and maybe an AED, you're not likely to have the equipment to do anything else. In most situations, additional equipment is going to arrive at the same time as the personnel who are trained to operate it.

  • Apr 16

    Yep - most people don't really want to know the details.

    "So you work in the happy place with all the babies?"
    "Uh huh, sure. That's me."

  • Mar 17

    Welcome, Maicor! Enjoy the discussions. Feel free to ask questions!

  • Mar 13

    Out of curiosity, what is the pharmacology behind using Narcan to reduce fever?

  • Feb 12

    EC grads,

    Post your year of graduation and your specialty/specialties. I'll go first:

    I've been a Level II/III Neonatal ICU nurse since graduation in January '06.


    Update 10/2015: I've worked for a large Level IV NICU since 2009, where I've had both bedside and staff development educator roles. Although I just finished a master's degree in nursing education (from EC), I am currently enjoying a role as a bedside nurse. I'm considering more school - trying to decide between the nurse practitioner route or the Ph.D./tenure-track faculty route.

  • Jan 3

    I haven't worked with intubated adults in some time, but I don't think that my employer or my insurance carrier would be too stoked about a staff nurse reintroducing an displaced ET tube. I'd go with option A - bag and call for help.

  • Nov 24 '15

    It's not outdated, but I think one confusing thing is that it has been deemphasized in NRP for many years. (Bicarb was a standard code drug for a long time, but now it's known that in coding neonates, there is usually respiratory acidosis, and bicarb will just raise the pCO2 and lower the pH in that situation.)

    In metabolic acidosis, bicarb is still often indicated, but it's also important to look at correctable causes of metabolic acidosis, like whether the baby is cold, fluid-depleted or perfusing poorly.

  • Nov 12 '15

    It's not outdated, but I think one confusing thing is that it has been deemphasized in NRP for many years. (Bicarb was a standard code drug for a long time, but now it's known that in coding neonates, there is usually respiratory acidosis, and bicarb will just raise the pCO2 and lower the pH in that situation.)

    In metabolic acidosis, bicarb is still often indicated, but it's also important to look at correctable causes of metabolic acidosis, like whether the baby is cold, fluid-depleted or perfusing poorly.

  • Nov 2 '15

    Congrats, jewls67. The most popular NICU reference book is Merenstein and Gardner's Handbook of Neonatal Intensive Care.

    Others to consider:

    Gomella's Neonatology - focused on medical dx and tx; less of the practical stuff like developmental care

    Assisted Ventilation of the Neonate by Goldsmith and Karotkin - complex in parts, but thorough; an understanding of ventilator modes can be a weakness for many NICU nurses

    Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation - peek at a copy of it - one of your docs should have it; cool pics and short descriptions of the most common syndromes, associations and sequences

    You may want to verify that my links lead to the current editions of these books. Good luck to ya!

  • Oct 19 '15

    Have to agree with the previous posters that staying calm and relaxing is the best thing to do. In my experience though, this should be the most common response:

    'I came to Allnurses.com and posted to everyone how nervous I was!'


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