Is Med/Surg attracting new grads? - page 3

Hello All, I am about to start my clinical consolidation with a preceptor on a med/surg floor. This is my main interest in nursing and why I chose to do my entire consolidation there. My fellow... Read More

  1. by   TinyNurse
    As a new grad, most of the students I graduated with are accpting positions elsewhere. We did the majority of our clinicals on med-surg and nothing in ICU or elsewhere. I myself got hired in an ER, although the skills I got in med-surge will live forever!!
    xo
    Jenni
  2. by   iluvsnoopy
    I graduated in May with my BScN. Out of my class of 28, approximately 5 are doing Surgery nursing and I am the only one on a Medical unit. I was petrified to go there because I had heard so many bad things about Medical from the nurses I worked with on Surgery during my final clinical rotation, plus all my classmates decided they would never ste foot on a medical floor. I kept an open mind when I was "forced" to go to Medical. Although I have acquired a part time permanent on Surgery (where I thought I wanted to be) as well as a temporary full time, I have applied for two full time permanent medical jobs and I can truly say I want to work on Medical. It is hard work (harder than I ever anticipated), but my days fly, and I feel I have found where I fit.
  3. by   agent
    If no one else in my class goes med/surg i probably will.
  4. by   whydidibother?
    I am currently an LPN, I had to take medical leave w/ 2 semesters left for my RN degree. I would LOVE to work Med-Surg. I enjoyed it during clinicals and have applied alot of hospitals in my area for a position. Problem is: the hospitals don't need anymore LPNs, they need RNs. :angryfire It annoys the crap out of me when I see the ad in the paper for a RN/LPN and when I apply they tell me they were just wanting to get as many nursing apps as possible but are really looking for RNs, OR I'm told I need more experience. . . uh. . . how can I get experience if I'm not going to be hired??? Thanks for letting me vent. My plan is to work Med-Surg when I get my RN(hopefully by May 05). Its a great place for learning!
  5. by   J Lynn
    As a new LPN grad, i'm not very marketable unless I start off in Med/Surg. I don't know very many units that will hire new grads without that experience first, especially LPNs. I'm thinking about starting off on Med/Surg in a large teaching hospital in New Orleans. After a year there, hopefully I can work anywhere, maybe I might even feel confident to go on for my RN.
  6. by   JuliaR
    Hi everyone!

    as i was reading ur posts, i don't know if i feel excitement or fear.

    I graduated BSN last 1997 from the Philippines and since then, I didn't have a nursing work-related experience. Recently, I passed NCLEX-RN and i just had my first interview with a hospital and i think i'll be hired as a Medical/Surgical nurse. DUring my first interview, i was briefly oriented to the unit and to the staff as well. I'm just waiting for them to call me and offer me the job.

    The nsg manager I spoke with told me that I will have a preceptor for 2 months with me as part of the orientation/training but really, i feel terrified because not being in practice for a while (more than 5 years) shakes up my confidence level (even passing the NCLEX-RN, can't help me to be confident now). I know med/surg is a very good training ground for nurses like me but i hope that everything will turn out good for me..do u have any tips for "coming back to the work force" nurses like me? thanks!!

    JuliaRN
  7. by   RN-PA
    Quote from JuliaR
    The nsg manager I spoke with told me that I will have a preceptor for 2 months with me as part of the orientation/training but really, i feel terrified because not being in practice for a while (more than 5 years) shakes up my confidence level (even passing the NCLEX-RN, can't help me to be confident now). I know med/surg is a very good training ground for nurses like me but i hope that everything will turn out good for me..do u have any tips for "coming back to the work force" nurses like me? thanks!!
    Passing the NCLEX-RN should help some because you've just recently spent a lot of time studying and refreshing your memory about many nursing concepts and critical thinking skills. If there's a "Refresher Course" offered in your area for nurses in a similar position, I'd recommend it. Also, on your own, spend more time re-reading your nursing fundamentals books. Re-read your med-surg textbook and when certain concepts or procedures seem fuzzy to you, research on the internet or in other books to help you feel more knowledgeable and confident. Get yourself a current reference book on medications and as you orient, you can find out the most regularly ordered meds on your unit and read up on them. There are also great little handbooks-- reference guides-- you can keep with you and study at home. I have two: "Nurse's Problem Solver" (Springhouse Corporation, Springhouse, PA, 1995) and "The Nurse's Survival Guide" (Brenda Goodner & Linda Skidmore-Roth, Skidmore-Roth Publishing, Inc., 1992). There are more out there that are more current, but these have been helpful.

    There's a new RN on our med-surg unit who grduated from nursing school and then went to work in her parents' business-- medical supplies or something similar-- for 8 years. I can't remember when she took the NCLEX-RN, but she didn't take a refresher course. It's been sort of rough for her, but most of my co-workers are supportive and helpful, and she had a good, long orientation. If you're working full-time, have some decent preceptors, and also learn on your own time, a 2-month orientation sounds pretty good. Most facilities will extend the orientation period if you're having trouble keeping up, and there are nurse educators who will spend time with you to help you get more comfortable with certain procedures.

    Try to think positively, and try to find a co-worker you feel comfortable with who won't mind you coming to them for questions or help once your orientation is over. I love helping new nurses because I had lousy orientations and am an extremely "late bloomer" as a med-surg nurse, and never had anyone to help me or be a mentor. So I'm extremely sensitive to the struggles and feelings of new nurses and enjoy helping them.
    Last edit by RN-PA on May 1, '04
  8. by   JuliaR
    Hi RN-PA,

    Thank you so much for your words of encouragement!

    I just hope that my preceptor will be someone just like you...it must be difficult for you to didn't have a mentor or a supportive preceptor while you were on your orientation. I bet you are a tough but very caring nurse


    Muchas Gracias!

    JuliaRN
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quite honestly, my home floor, the avarage ratio is one nurse for 7 patients, typically it's one nurse for every 6-8 patients. The acuity doesn't matter, according to corporate, and lately we've had a lot of ruptured appys and such. That's why this new grad changed her mind about med-surg.
  10. by   RN-PA
    Quote from JuliaR
    Hi RN-PA,

    Thank you so much for your words of encouragement!

    I just hope that my preceptor will be someone just like you...it must be difficult for you to didn't have a mentor or a supportive preceptor while you were on your orientation. I bet you are a tough but very caring nurse


    Muchas Gracias!

    JuliaRN
    You're very welcome, Julia! I sometimes think I'd give anything to do my early nursing years over with a decent orientation and foundation. (I wish I'd known to ask for a longer orientation and/or better preceptors.) It was painful but it makes the pain somewhat worthwhile if I can help others, and it's increased my compassion for new nurses. My experiences have made me tougher-- But in a good way. Believe me-- I needed toughening!

    I wish you all the best and feel free to pm me if I can help in the future!
  11. by   jaimealmostRN
    Quote from EmeraldNYL
    Actually one of the hospitals I'm considering has like a 6 mo. ICU orientation program, they start new grads on stepdown/telemetry first. I don't see how doing med/surg will help me in ICU.
    The only place I have ever ever ever ever ever ever (you get the point) wanted to work is in the emergency dept. In my area though they do not offer ED externships (except for 1 hosp that requires a BSN program). Since the ICU extern. were full, I choose Telemetry. I dislike Med-Surg also only b/c of the patient #s, visitors,etc. But Tele is great b/c it uses most of the gtts that are in ICU/ED settings, has a pretty high accuity level (Renal failure,a-fib, post MIs, a lot of possible codes). Trust me, I'm not excited about being "away from the action" of critical care, but I am excited about being able to reinforce/learn a great deal of basic skills along with working with all of the things I mentioned above. Only bad thing....I'm not sure how to break it to the manager at the end of the summer that I don't want to work there after graduation! Oh and can she give me a recomendation to the eD???
  12. by   Nutmeg5575
    I know this is an old thread but I did a search to see if any of my questions were answered. It did answer a lot of my questions but I still have some more.

    I plan on starting out med/surg and getting my bsn part time after I finish nursing school. I want to work either in ED or in the OR (that is how I feel now anyways).

    I read on this thread that someone started working in med/surg as a stepping stone and they got "stuck" in it for 15 years! What do I need to do to make sure I don't get stuck in med/surg?

    It will take me 2 1/2 years to get my BSN so that is how long I want to work in med/surg.

    Is it stupid to get certified in Med/surg if I plan to work in a different specialty? I figure if I know it I might as well have a paper that says I know it. Can you have certifications in different specialties? Like med/surg and OR.

    Is it advisable to let your boss know that you are just using med/surg as a stepping stone in the beginning? Or will that make them mad? When you decide to leave for a different specialty what are the procedures for that and how do you inform your boss?

    I'm not trying to "diss" med/surg, and who knows I may end up loving it once I start it. Thanks in advance for your advice.
  13. by   Thunderwolf
    Many folks will say, Med Surg is a great stepping stone....I am one of them. Many will say that this is not necessary and just go into your specialty after school....Med Surg not even necessary. Med Surg will give you much to learn...especially learning and improving on your organizational skills. In Med Surg, you will see and work with everything....not so typically when you become more specialized. Also, no....you do not need to be certified in Med Surg, especially if you plan to leave it anyway. I would suggest saving yourself the worry, the time, and the expense for the area that you truly wish to specialize in. Wish you the best!

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