Anyone else feel like they got "shafted" in clinicals? - page 3

by forgop 8,744 Views | 37 Comments

I'm in my 2nd semester in an accelerated program. I'm the only male in a group of 7 students for our summer rotation of Med/Surg II, Peds, and Maternity. I was literally the "odd man out" when it came to patient assignments the... Read More


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    I feel bad cause I kinda have that, "if you don't want me, I don't want you" mentality regarding OB. I had a pretty excluding experience myself in clinicals so it makes it hard when you feel excluding to even care about that side of the hospital. I'll be looking into ED, and ICU when I graduate.
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    I'll start off by saying that I am one of those young 20 something year old females terrified of childbirth... I realize that this "miracle" may be an inevitable avenue if I wish to have kids... but I involuntarily stutter when I even talk about it. I saw one vaginal birth and that was more than enough for me (while encouraging the mother to push I was looking over at my friend mouthing the word "never")... it was kind of like that scene from "Knocked Up."

    That being said I had a two guys in my OB clinical that weren't permitted to witness a birth as per the mothers' preference (my professor did her best though). I decided that when and if I decide to have children that I would specifically ask if there were any male students that day who wanted to come in. If I'm focused on pushing out an 8lb bowling ball I would venture to believe that I don't care who's looking at what as long as I'm getting my pain meds. As far as I'm concerned this is the most effective type of sex ed there is for both sexes... it's good to know what you could "accidentally," get yourself into if you're not careful.

    Hopefully more women will develop this perspective as well and in the future male nurses will be able to see more... but for some of you a YouTube video or two might cover it.
    MUUGUZI, MN-Nurse, and Tinman1017 like this.
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    My experience in being excluded in OB is similar to many already voiced. I'd like to add that the impression given to me by some of the nurses on the floor was less than warm as well. By that I mean I got the impression I was an 'unwanted observer' as a male student. I felt the attitude was that I would never be accepted nor work in OB, so I wasn't treated with the same level of cooperation as the female students were. I learned a fair amount, but I was on the outside looking in, and yes, I would never work in OB so I guess the attitude by the nurses is well founded.
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    Hey man.

    I was the only guy in a group with 9 other females. I saw 4 vaginal births and 2 C-Sections. Way more than I wanted too. Count yourself lucky and that OB is over. Haha. OB clinicals are seen as kind of a "joke" by most of the nursing faculty at my university. It's one of the "easier" classes in the cirriculum. Best of luck man! Don't dwell on one bad OB rotation! It's a very specialized area, sort of like oncology or critical care.
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    Quote from jad623
    If I'm focused on pushing out an 8lb bowling ball I would venture to believe that I don't care who's looking at what as long as I'm getting my pain meds.
    As someone who did push that 8 lb bowling ball out, once I got that epidural in place I felt so wonderful that a whole nursing school cohort could have been in there watching and cheering and I would not have cared less I finally understood why women in labor want to kiss their anesthesiologists.

    If I ever give birth again, I wouldn't mind a male student in there. Actually, one of my nurses in the delivery room was in fact male. That didn't bother me at all--he was there doing his job, and he did it well.

    I think its unfair that guys may get the short end of the stick in L&D clinicals...but I can accept it only if that is the patient's wish. Now, if the patient is OK with it and your instructor or the staff decides for no good reason that you can't watch a delivery because you're a guy, that's pretty messed up.
    Last edit by Meriwhen on Jan 31, '12
    lrobinson5 likes this.
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    Quote from Stcroix
    My experience in being excluded in OB is similar to many already voiced. I'd like to add that the impression given to me by some of the nurses on the floor was less than warm as well. By that I mean I got the impression I was an 'unwanted observer' as a male student. I felt the attitude was that I would never be accepted nor work in OB, so I wasn't treated with the same level of cooperation as the female students were. I learned a fair amount, but I was on the outside looking in, and yes, I would never work in OB so I guess the attitude by the nurses is well founded.
    Certainly,I will return the favor whenever I am the patient and tell the femalenurse to go find me a male nurse for my intimate care needs.
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    haha, I found the pregnant women didn't usually have a problem with the males it was their mother that had old fashioned views. What struck me as really funny is they had no problem letting the male doctor do his thing but wanted me out of the room when her female parts would be exposed. Honestly, I didn't mind because it meant I could study for exams instead of pretending to be interested in something I am not.

    I did however have good experience in the nursery.
    Meriwhen and Stcroix like this.
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    If I didn't have to do an OB rotation I wouldn't. Not gonna offend me one bit to be asked to leave.
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    I would be upset if I was missing out on something that everyone else was able to learn from and was reflected in a later test. That just sounds wrong. But, like many have said, it really depends on the patients, staff, instructors...I hope when my turn comes, it isn't even an issue.
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    Keep in mind that the girl nursing students often say that the guy nurses are the most patient and best teachers. You'll be one soon! Plus, a lot of the patient's think you're the doctors, this can be a good and bad thing.


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