I want to be an lpn..

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    But my fiancé is trying to talk me into going for the rn... Agh sorry its just a vent
  2. 14 Comments so far...

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    Well just wondering, why don't you want to go for RN? And what are his reasons for wanting you to go for RN?
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    Quote from Kdrenee
    Well just wondering, why don't you want to go for RN? And what are his reasons for wanting you to go for RN?
    His reason I believe is that they make more money. My reason is that the school is faster, and we live with his grandmother right now. I want to get my foot in the door somewhere so that we can move sooner. We are running out of space here, but can't afford to buy a house right now. I'm a school bus driver and lost a lot of routes, so I'm not making enough money. We live in Massachusetts and LPN's are still doing well here, too. When my mom was sick with diverticulitis the LPN did everything and the RN came in once for the paperwork. I'd rather care for patients more than paperwork.
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    Are you doing it for the money or because you think you'll really enjoy nursing as a career?

    My opinion is that you should go for RN, take CNA/STNA classes and work in a nursing home or hospital while in school. BUT it does take time and determination. Yes, LPN is quicker and just as fulfilling but then you become limited in your choice of jobs when you get done with school. I am an LPN and I did it for the quickness--in hindsight I wish I would have just went for RN right away instead of trying to do it while working and with 2 kids like I am now.
    Juryizout likes this.
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    But I also don't agree with doing something purely because your boyfriend tells you to. Make a list of pros and cons and decide for yourself. Good luck!
    Juryizout likes this.
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    I agree with keepcalm.

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    I can relate. My husband wants me to do the RN since we only have a certain amount of months left on his GI Bill. I'd like to do the LPN or at least get my CNA license so that I am not completely blow away when nursing school starts. Also I hear that it is hard to get a job as a new grad RN if you have no prior experience in the medical field. Where I am, the LPN classes are just as long as an RN class (2 years) I think what I am going to do is pre-reqs for both programs and then apply to both. Good luck with whatever you chose!
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    Quote from Keep_Calm
    Are you doing it for the money or because you think you'll really enjoy nursing as a career?

    My opinion is that you should go for RN, take CNA/STNA classes and work in a nursing home or hospital while in school. BUT it does take time and determination. Yes, LPN is quicker and just as fulfilling but then you become limited in your choice of jobs when you get done with school. I am an LPN and I did it for the quickness--in hindsight I wish I would have just went for RN right away instead of trying to do it while working and with 2 kids like I am now.
    I see the money as a pro. But honestly, I've been researching medical field jobs for a while now. I feel that I have the right personality to be a nurse. I have a child and I'd get my foot in the door sooner as an LPN. My living situation isn't good and we will run out of space if I do the RN program. I'm not picky with jobs, I'd be happy and appreciate working wherever I can find a job. All I know is that I want to do this.
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    I think it depends on your situation and what is best for you. For example, I currently work as a pct at a hospital here. In order to do my RN, it would take three more years for me of school, including the cores. For LPN, I should start in May and be through with it next August. So I am taking the quickest way to become a nurse, then work on my RN after. However, if you have the time, you might as well go straight for the RN. I have heard pros and cons of both from the LPN's and RN's that work on the floor....I have also seen things myself. One thing that stands out to me here is that the LPN classes come through alot more for clinicals vs. the RN classes. I think I might want the one with more clinical time. I will take all the practice/experience I can get!
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    Quote from Lb321
    His reason I believe is that they make more money. My reason is that the school is faster, and we live with his grandmother right now. I want to get my foot in the door somewhere so that we can move sooner. We are running out of space here, but can't afford to buy a house right now. I'm a school bus driver and lost a lot of routes, so I'm not making enough money. We live in Massachusetts and LPN's are still doing well here, too. When my mom was sick with diverticulitis the LPN did everything and the RN came in once for the paperwork. I'd rather care for patients more than paperwork.
    Getting out and earning a paycheck sooner by going the LPN route only makes sense if you are absolutely positive your local job market has a need and willingness to hire LPNs. Otherwise you may end up wasting months of time job hunting that you could've spent working towards getting your RN, which gives you multiple paths of possible employment. The present oversupply of nurses means that in most areas your options as an LPN are narrowing.

    You should look carefully at how much time your LPN program actually takes compared to the RN programs in your area. Sometimes, especially if you go through a community college program with pre-requisites the time difference isn't all that much. Private, for-profit programs will get you through more quickly, but are very expensive, and your loan payments will be due beginning less than a year after you graduate, whether you have a job or not.

    Those are just a few things to think about. Best wishes to you!


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