Do you feel that the LPN program should be more than one year? - page 3

this is soooo not meant to spark an lpn vs rn battle, but to help lpns cope with our respective programs. no one is better or worse than the other, and if you feel argumentative, i kindly ask you to... Read More

  1. by   momedsurglpn
    Quote from DYatesRN
    If you have those pre-req's why not move on to much more money if you feel you are doing near the same job. Yes. there are nurses of all types that sit around...I am not disputing that one! I am just saying that an LPN certificate/degree is not equal to the RN degree...most boards justify this. My point is I tire of LPN's saying it is almost equal--and 9 times out of 10 we do carry the same jobs--so move on, get that last little "6 months" and get the pay YOU deserve for your hard work. There is always going to be the butt sitting BSN, LPN, CNA...we know this BUT there are some EXCELLENT bedside BSN, ADN, LPN, and CNA's. It is quite unfair to bash one. One of my best friends is a bedside BSN--one of the best nurses I know. I started at the bottom CNA-5 years, LPN 10 years, RN-less than a year, BSN in the works...we all start somewhere. I say move on LPN's if you are doing the same thing and know more than the BSN--get the degree for the extra pay if nothing else!
    If you can show me a program where I could get my RN in "6 little months" I will jump on it!!! The accelerated LPN program here is one year after you get your prereq's, no breaks, a full year. I work nights 7p-7a fri, sat and mon. I have talked to my supervisors and I would still have to work those nights, so as you can see I would have to stay up all night and go to class and clinicals with no sleep. Don't think I would do very well. This is the point. Make it so those like me could accomplish it! Also, why would I want to? I will make less money at this point as a new RN and all my experience will not count for anything as a LPN!!!!! So 20 years down the drain.Where's the incentive?
  2. by   DYatesRN
    Quote from momedsurglpn
    If you can show me a program where I could get my RN in "6 little months" I will jump on it!!! The accelerated LPN program here is one year after you get your prereq's, no breaks, a full year. I work nights 7p-7a fri, sat and mon. I have talked to my supervisors and I would still have to work those nights, so as you can see I would have to stay up all night and go to class and clinicals with no sleep. Don't think I would do very well. This is the point. Make it so those like me could accomplish it! Also, why would I want to? I will make less money at this point as a new RN and all my experience will not count for anything as a LPN!!!!! So 20 years down the drain.Where's the incentive?
    I was qouting someone else saying in this thread that the RN program was "only six months more." I know it takes more time than that. Yes, I wish there were more programs that would fast track experienced LPN's like yourself...it is unfortunate. I still think RN opens more doors and pays better in general. I was given credit for my previous LPN experience, so not all places deny you credit for LPN experience....
  3. by   MereSanity
    Wow...DYatesRN you sound like you have some issues with LPN's. ALL are necessary and needed...LPN's ADN's, and even BSN's. It's just too bad that not all nurses are able to see this.

    -signed...way tired of all this fighting...move on.
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from DYatesRN
    If you have those pre-req's why not move on to much more money if you feel you are doing near the same job. Yes. there are nurses of all types that sit around...I am not disputing that one! I am just saying that an LPN certificate/degree is not equal to the RN degree...most boards justify this. My point is I tire of LPN's saying it is almost equal--and 9 times out of 10 we do carry the same jobs--so move on, get that last little "6 months" and get the pay YOU deserve for your hard work. There is always going to be the butt sitting BSN, LPN, CNA...we know this BUT there are some EXCELLENT bedside BSN, ADN, LPN, and CNA's. It is quite unfair to bash one. One of my best friends is a bedside BSN--one of the best nurses I know. I started at the bottom CNA-5 years, LPN 10 years, RN-less than a year, BSN in the works...we all start somewhere. I say move on LPN's if you are doing the same thing and know more than the BSN--get the degree for the extra pay if nothing else!

    It is NOT always about the money for some people!

    RN may open more doors (depending on what the individual wants for their career) but that belong on another thread entirely. The question was "do you think the LPN program should be more than one year?"
  5. by   Chicklet2
    In Alberta, Canada they have now starting this september have made the LPN program 2 yrs with normal breaks. I took the 13yr program where u only get 2 weeks off at summer. The 2yr program will also have psychology and an english class. I dont know if the 2yrs will be better than the 13 months or not, but I enjoyed the 13months. the first semester with patho and anatomy was by far the hardest. After that it just sorta breezed bye.
  6. by   DutchgirlRN
    I went to a 13 month LPN program and I felt like it was sufficent. When you throw out English, History, Algebra and concentrate on nursing you can do it in a year. I am now an RN. It's the best thing I've ever done for myself. I enjoyed studying as an adult and graduated at the age of 46. I'm now 50.
  7. by   Purple Princess
    I started in an RN program at the community college, ended up working as a CNA for awhile, and am now in an LPN program. I have an associate degree in liberal arts. As for the RN program I had almost everything completed when I was told to withdrawl. But it was a 3 year program and considered full time. My LPN program now is two years part time yet it seems like we're covering a heck of alot of material!!! We have three levels each one is about 8 months long. We get maybe a week off here and there, very sparingly. We have clinical, pharmacology, nursing, and we took finals on nutrition and anatomy. What is interesting is that RN's are suppose to know so much more than LPN's and are paid more. But I feel I've learned more in 6 months of this program than I did in over a year of the RN program. We have been taught vitals, assessment, basic care, transferring, precautions, medications, and just a whole bunch of stuff. The teachers also show us how to operate different medical equipment so we don't get alarmed when something starts beeping and don't know what to do. I feel I will be just as good of a nurse if not better based on my experiences than any nurse that comes out of the RN program.
  8. by   N.S.46
    Quote from Sirena922
    I live in Michigan also. Do you mind if I ask you what school your attending? Right now I'm taking my prereq's at Davenport, trying to get into their LPN program. I should have my # this fall.


    Hello Sirena922,
    I also live in MI & taking pre-req's at Davenport for LPN. Which campus are you at if you mind my asking. I'm at the Warren Campus.
  9. by   Rozaloca
    Quote from DYatesRN
    RN's have more than just 6 months extra schooling...most have a year of pre-req's that include intense sciences classes with labs (I had micro, Anatomy, physiology). I tire quite easily of bashing each other's degree. LPN's serve their place as well as all levels of RN's. So a BSN may not have put a foley in (this is basic and can be learned on the job) but an LPN is not qualified to carry the supervisory responsiblity of the BSN--nor are they licensed to do so.......
    When I went to the hospital program...1985...the RN program was at that time 6 months longer....including their psyche, math, labs, and all their things they needed for the COMPLETE program. The RN students went from Sept- May for 2 years. Summers off. 18 months total. We, too had psyche, labs, A&P...no micro, though...I do know some people who have attended LPN programs that included micro, and actually needed college pre-req.'s. And, yes, we can function in the supervisory capacity. In Maryland, I was a unit manager, and knew Quality Assurance nurses that were LPN's. There are also LPN's that are DON's in the LTC facilities. It depends which state you practice in as to what you are allowed to do, and this also varies from facility to facility. My point about the foley was, yes, many things can be learned on the job, but to understand the complications, be skilled and smooth when you are taking care of a real patient and be comfortable, which comes with practice is key in GOOD PATIENT CARE
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    As it's been stated on numerous threads, it's not the quantity of education, it's the QUALITY.
  11. by   Mandylpn
    Mine was four full semesters, including the pre-reqs, plus a CNA course before you could even apply for the program.

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